American Indian Studies (IS)

Four Year Plan - B.A. in American Indian Studies A (AIS as second major)
Four Year Plan - B.A. in American Indian Studies B (four years; even year freshman enrollment)
Four Year Plan - B.A. in American Indian Studies C (four years; uneven year freshman enrollment)

Four Year Plan - B.A. in American Indian Studies A (AIS as second major)

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman Year
FallCredits
Essential Studies/First Major/Electives 15
 Credits15
Spring
Essential Studies/First Major/Electives 15
 Credits15
Sophomore Year
Fall
First Major/Essential Studies/Electives 15
 Credits15
Spring
First Major/Essential Studies/Electives 15
 Credits15
Junior Year
Fall
IS 121
or IS 122
or IS 123
Introduction to American Indian Studies
or
or
3
IS 230 3
IS 360 Oral Traditions in American Indian Cultures 3
Elective/First Major/Essential Studies 6
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/First Major/Essential Studies 12
IS 348 3
 Credits15
Senior Year
Fall
Electives/First Major/Essential Studies 12
IS 240 Research and Writing in Indian Studies 3
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/First Major/Essential Studies/ 9
IS 395 3
IS 410 Indigenous Identities 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits120

This is an example of a course of study leading to a BA in American Indian Studies. Plans of courses differ between even and uneven years. Please visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member to determine a personalized plan. Students need to satisfy all published Essential Studies requirements. To determine how to best fulfill these requirements and the electives requirements in the American Indian Studies major, students should visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member.

You must complete enough electives to bring total credit hours up to the 125. Special Emphasis courses can fulfill an essential studies requirement (example-History 104, US History, will count toward the US Diversity as well as the Humanities area). Please Note: Every student must fulfill all University, Departmental, and Essential Studies requirements.

Four Year Plan - B.A. in American Indian Studies B (four years; even year freshman enrollment)

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman Year
FallCredits
IS 121
or IS 122
or IS 123
Introduction to American Indian Studies
or
or
3
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 15
 Credits15
Sophomore Year
Fall
IS 240 Research and Writing in Indian Studies 3
American Indian Studies elective 3
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 9
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
IS 395 3
 Credits15
Junior Year
Fall
IS 230 3
IS 360 Oral Traditions in American Indian Cultures 3
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 9
 Credits15
Spring
IS 348 3
Elective/Essential Studies/Second Major 15
 Credits18
Senior Year
Fall
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
 Credits12
Spring
IS 410 Indigenous Identities 3
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
 Credits15
 Total Credits120

This is an example of a course of study leading to a BA in American Indian Studies. Please visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member to determine a personalized plan. Students need to satisfy all published Essential Studies requirements. To determine how to best fulfill these requirements and the electives requirements in the American Indian Studies major, students should visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member.

You must complete enough electives to bring total credit hours up to the 125. Special Emphasis courses can fulfill an essential studies requirement (example-History 104, US History, will count toward the US Diversity as well as the Humanities area). Please Note: Every student must fulfill all University, Departmental, and Essential Studies requirements.


Four Year Plan - B.A.  American Indian Studies C (four years; uneven year freshman enrollment)

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman Year
FallCredits
IS 121
or IS 122
or IS 123
Introduction to American Indian Studies
or
or
3
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 15
 Credits15
Sophomore Year
Fall
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
IS 230 3
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
IS 348 3
 Credits15
Junior Year
Fall
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
IS 240 Research and Writing in Indian Studies 3
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 9
IS 395 3
IS 410 Indigenous Identities 3
 Credits15
Senior Year
Fall
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 12
IS 360 Oral Traditions in American Indian Cultures 3
 Credits15
Spring
Electives/Essential Studies/Second Major 15
 Credits15
 Total Credits120

This is an example of a course of study leading to a BA in American Indian Studies. Please visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member to determine a personalized plan. Students need to satisfy all published Essential Studies requirements. To determine how to best fulfill these requirements and the electives requirements in the American Indian Studies major, students should visit with an American Indian Studies faculty member.

You must complete enough electives to bring total credit hours up to the 125. Special Emphasis courses can fulfill an essential studies requirement (example-History 104, US History, will count toward the US Diversity as well as the Humanities area). Please Note: Every student must fulfill all University, Departmental, and Essential Studies requirements.

IS 121. Introduction to American Indian Studies. 3 Credits.

Introduction to main concepts, methods, and theories in American Indian Studies, designed to provide a background for further studies. This course approaches American Indian Studies from a perspective grounded in the humanities. F,S,SS.

IS 151. Popular Culture and American Indians. 3 Credits.

European settlers had firm notions of what tribal peoples on the American continent were like before even leaving Europe. This course will show how these stereotypes and ethnocentrisms were perpetuated in various genres and fields, e.g. captivity tales, fiction, film, advertisements, and social media. Finally, students will analyze some recent examples of these stereotypes and ethnocentrisms in print and film. SS.

IS 201. History of the Lakota. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the Siouan speakers, predominantly the Dakota and Lakota nations, from their origins to today. It focuses primarily on the last two hundred years. The course gives a timeline for this history, explores the context of events, and discusses appropriate methodologies. S.

IS 203. History of the Ojibwe. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the Anishinabe, predominantly the Chippewa or Ojibwe nations, from their origins to today. It focuses primarily on the last two hundred years. The course gives a timeline for this history, explores the context of events, and addresses some cultural issues. F.

IS 207. History of the Three Affiliated Tribes. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara nations, from their origins to today. It focuses primarily on the last two hundred years. The course gives a timeline for this history, explores the context of events, and discusses appropriate methodologies. S.

IS 225. Gender and Sexuality. 3 Credits.

This class will cover the diverse gender and sexuality systems of several Native American groups before and during settler colonialism, including Two-Spirit, or Indigenous LGBTQ, experiences. S, even years.

IS 232. Ojibwe Language I. 3 Credits.

Conversational Ojibwemowin, or Ojibwe language, with a focus on beginner-level grammar and vocabulary. This course includes discussions of culture and language revitalization. F, even years.

IS 235. Ojibwe Language II. 3 Credits.

Conversational Ojibwemowin, or Ojibwe language, with a focus on beginner- and intermediate-level grammar and vocabulary. This course includes discussions of culture and language revitalization. Prerequisite: IS 232. On demand.

IS 240. Research and Writing in Indian Studies. 1-4 Credits.

The course will introduce students to professional writing in Indian Studies. The final goal is for students to turn out a 20-25 page research paper in an area of interest to them. Repeatable to 4.00 credits. On demand.

IS 250. Lakota Language I. 3 Credits.

This is the first of two Lakota language classes for beginning speakers. On demand.

IS 251. Lakota Languages II. 3 Credits.

This is the second of two Lakota language classes for beginning speakers. Prerequisite: IS 250 or permission. On demand.

IS 252. Lakota Languages III. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of the principles established for LL1 and LL2 with focus on fluency and accuracy using complex inflection and sentence structure at the intermediate level, including the full range of Lakota clause types and long sentences with conjugations. The course offers a balanced approach to teaching fluency, accuracy and complexity at the intermediate level, using various learning styles and resources. Students will read more complex authentic texts and listen to recordings from native speakers, followed by reading and listening to comprehension exercises. They will also continue to develop their communicative skills by participating in a role play of daily situations and having scaffold conversational activities. Creative writing with focus on developing accuracy and complexity will be a strong component of the course. Prerequisite: IS 251 or permission. On demand.

IS 253. Lakota Languages IV. 3 Credits.

An upper-intermediate course focusing on language proficiency in a cultural context which builds on Lakota Language 3. It is designed to consolidate communicative language skills while beginning a more systematic study of Lakota literature with the goal of encountering complex sentence structure and grammar in authentic texts and narratives. The course also offers further practice of fluency mainly through free (i.e. unguided) learning activities, with additional focus on accuracy and complexity at the given level, using various learning styles and resources. Prerequisite: IS 252 and T&L 330, or permission. On demand.

IS 262. Indigenous Art. 3 Credits.

Examines Native American art and architectural history from ancient to modern contexts and discusses contemporary Native artists. Student coursework includes a creative element. F, even years.

IS 325. Federal Policy and Native Nations. 3 Credits.

This course discusses Native American nations' inherent sovereignty and their unique legal and political status in relation to the United States. F, odd years.

IS 333. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Credits.

This course addresses two major topics: how Native North Americans have influenced world history, and the experiences of Indigenous peoples around the globe. S, odd years.

IS 342. Native Environmental History. 3 Credits.

Examines the historical relationships between Native North Americans and the environment, with an emphasis on the history of the Northern Plains from the eighteenth-century fur trade to the Dakota Access Pipeline. S, odd years.

IS 344. Boarding Schools and Their Legacies. 3 Credits.

Throughout the centuries of American Indian and white contact, American Indian education advocated by the colonial and federal governments as well as by various denominations has reflected the changing attitudes, stereotypes, and ethnocentrisms of Europeans and Euroamericans toward American Indian peoples. This course will examine the changing policies of the federal government, the attitudes of the various denominations, and some of the contemporary changes in the educational system. S.

IS 356. Law, Culture, and Communities. 3 Credits.

This course explores in what ways laws impact indigenous communities, and how different communities use, construct, and perceive laws. It explores the cultural construction and meaning of law through its implementation in and on Native communities. F.

IS 358. American Indians and Sovereignty. 3 Credits.

This course is an historical inquiry into the colonial imposition of sovereignty onto Native America and the resulting American Indian tribal claims to sovereignty and the concomitant development of "Indian law" within the legal frameworks of modern North American nation states (Canada, United States, and Mexico). It will examine the initial colonial encounters between indigenous and imperial legal cultures, the 19th century United States policies and judicial findings that established precedents for continued Indian sovereignty, and the expansion of those precedents and how over the course of the 20th century Indian nations have used these to establish federally recognized tribal governments and established the place of "Indian common law" as the law in Indian country. We will also look at how issues of sovereignty impact issues such as gaming, natural resource management, and economic development. S, even years.

IS 360. Oral Traditions in American Indian Cultures. 3 Credits.

Despite all predictions that they would disappear, American Indian oral traditions are as strong today as ever before. This course will introduce students to the complexities, richness, and conventions of different oral traditions as well as to the collecting process. F.

IS 365. Public and Environmental Health. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the ways in which Indigenous communities have perceived and dealt with public and environmental health issues from the period before contact with Europeans to the present day. S, even years.

IS 368. Issues in Native Health. 3 Credits.

This course addresses one or more currently relevant topics in Native health or healthcare through the lens of the humanities. These topics may include mental health, reproductive health, health in law and policy, comparative study of Indigenous health in the United States and elsewhere, or others. S, odd years.

IS 370. Native Civil Rights. 3 Credits.

History of civil rights activism by Indigenous peoples in the United States, addressing the unique needs and goals of Native peoples within diverse political movements. S, even years.

IS 373. Native Health Workers. 3 Credits.

History and biography of Native health workers in the past and examination of issues that face Indigenous people in healthcare labor today. Coursework includes an oral history element. F, even years.

IS 375. Health and Food Sovereignty. 3 Credits.

This course addresses Native communities' self-determination over food as a matter of community and environmental health. It covers the history of food and colonialism and the modern struggles for food security, land sovereignty, and revitalization of food traditions. F, odd years.

IS 379. Special Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Topics and credits will vary with availability of staff, and with student interests. Repeatable when topics vary. Repeatable.

IS 410. Indigenous Identities. 3 Credits.

This course looks at issues of indigenous identity: how do people define themselves and others, and what criteria do they use to construct, invent, and imagine their identities? The course focuses on North America, but also looks at global indigenous identities. S.

IS 430. Internship in American Indian Studies. 3 Credits.

Internships provide the opportunity for students to have a meaningful experience related to their field of interest within Indian Studies. Internship placements are with Native American related public or private sector sponsors such as tribal programs, businesses including tribal businesses on a reservation, and various state or private agencies serving Indian populations and causes. Individual learning agreements approved by the Indian Studies faculty and sponsoring supervisors specify student goals, objectives, and methods of assessment. It is expected that students will be of service to the sponsor. Internships may be paid. Prerequisite: Upperclass standing and instructor permission. F,S,SS.

IS 492. Directed Readings in American Indian Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Under the direction of American Indian Studies faculty, students will select readings in subjects not covered in sufficient detail in other American Indian Studies classes. IS 492 and IS 494 combined may be taken for a maximum of 9 credits; must be taken from at least two different faculty if above 6 credits. Prerequisite: Upperclass standing and consent of instructor. Repeatable to 9.00 credits. F,S,SS.

IS 494. Independent Study in American Indian Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Under the direction of American Indian Studies faculty, students will engage in independent research projects in American Indian Studies subjects. IS 492 and IS 494 combined may be taken for a maximum of 9 credits; must be taken from at least two different faculty if above 6 credits. Prerequisite: Upperclass standing and instructor permission. Repeatable to 9.00 credits. F,S,SS.