Teaching and Leadership

EDL Courses

EDL 501. Leadership and Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with preparation in skills for providing purpose and direction for individuals and groups, shaping school culture and value, facilitating the development of shared strategic vision for the school, formulating goals and planning change efforts with staff, and setting priorities for one's school in the context of community and district priorities for student and staff needs.

EDL 502. Technology and Information Systems. 3 Credits.

This course provides an understanding of selected PK-12 computer applications for educational administrators. The focus of instruction is to have educational leaders use the computer for analyzing school improvement data, as a tool for decision-making and planning, and for carrying out communication functions of administration at the building and district levels. On demand.

EDL 511. Effective Administrative Communications. 3 Credits.

This course prepares aspiring school leaders to plan for their personal and professional development; understand and use the principles of interpersonal, oral, and written communication.

EDL 512. Leading K-12 Classroom Assessment and Grading. 3 Credits.

This course provides educators, school leaders, and instructional support staff with an understanding of how to design and use classroom assessments so they are an aligned part of the instructional process to inform both teachers' corrective action and student learning improvements. This course also explores how to implement effective classroom grading policies and practices so that reported grades are more fair, accurate, and meaningful for students. S,SS.

EDL 513. Leading K-12 Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders the ability to understand major curriculum design models, interpret school district curricula, initiate needs analyses, plan and implement with staff a framework for instruction, align curriculum with anticipated outcomes, monitor social and technological developments as they affect curriculum, and adjust instructional content as needs and conditions change. F.

EDL 514. Supervision and Professional Development. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with preparation in skills for instructional improvement, working with faculty and staff to identify professional needs. Classes are designed for in-depth study and practice planning, organizing, and facilitating programs that improve faculty and staff effectiveness and are consistent with institutional goals and needs; supervising individuals and groups; providing feedback on performance; arranging for remedial assistance; engaging faculty and others to plan and participate in recruitment and development activities; and initiating self-development. On demand.

EDL 515. Education Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course is designed as a beginning law course for school administrators. In addition to the acquisition of legal knowledge as it relates to P-12 education, students are introduced to ethical perspectives that frequently influence the legal decision-making process.

EDL 516. Education Finance and Policy. 3 Credits.

Includes such topics as the organization of and responsibility for education in the United States at the federal, state, and local levels; basic administrative theories, processes, and techniques; and major areas of concern in the operation of local schools. The course includes an experiential learning assignment in which students complete a budget project.

EDL 517. Social, Cultural, Political, and Community Dimensions of Schools. 4 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with an understanding of the historical, philosophical, ethical, social, and economic influences affecting education to the degree that they can apply their understandings to professional decisions. Students are expected to apply political concepts and strategies and approaches to collaboration in involving the community in decision making, building community support for integrating health and social services in support of students, and developing community support for school priorities. Throughout the course, students' work will be expected to manifest a sensitivity to issues of diversity in a pluralistic society.

EDL 519. Principalship. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with an understanding of the role of the building principal along with skills and techniques associated with the principalship. The course emphasizes the National Educational Leadership Prep (NELP) professional/accreditation standards including the principal's role in community and family relationships and collaboration, using community resources to support the academic and social needs of students and families, the development and application of policies related to students and staff, planning and delivering of curricular and co-curricular programs within the school, and the principal's role in working with staff. Prerequisite: EDL 501. F, odd years.

EDL 523. The Educational Plant. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the planning, construction, modification, and maintenance of school buildings and complimentary facilities such as playgrounds, athletic fields and facilities, drop-off zones, and parking lots. This course will include appraisal of school facilities and techniques for developing and using input from the community and building and program audits.

EDL 524. Educational Personnel Administration. 3 Credits.

Study of selection, assignment, evaluation, development, and release practices for certified and non-certified school personnel; salary and contract administration in schools. Study of labor laws, HIPAA, and FMLA. F.

EDL 526. Business Management in Education. 3 Credits.

Study of the business function in educational organizations with emphasis on budget development and administration, accounting, purchasing, risk management, support services, and capital outlay. On demand.

EDL 527. Legal Issues in Education. 3 Credits.

Study of the legal issues affecting educational organizations with emphasis on state and federal relationships to local institutions, school boards and other governing bodies, contracts, teachers' and students' rights, and tort liability of educational organizations and their officers. Consideration is given to legal research and policy analysis.

EDL 529. Special Education Law. 3 Credits.

A course designed to give participants a working knowledge of the legislative, judicial, and administrative changes which have revamped the areas of teaching and administering special education since 1974. It will provide information useful to administrators, practitioners, attorneys, parents, and advocates on topics including: student records, discipline, related services, due process, least restrictive environment, and appropriate education.

EDL 531. School District Leadership. 3 Credits.

A study of concerns and issues related to education leadership and administration at the district level, including relationships between the superintendent and the school board, community and school district staff. S, even years.

EDL 532. Staff and Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

A study of the evaluation of staff, including teachers, administrators, support personnel, and boards; and for purposes of accreditation, the evaluation of components that support the curriculum. Procedures, processes, and instruments will be identified and analyzed. F.

EDL 533. Collective Negotiations. 2 Credits.

A study of the collective bargaining process in the field of education. Includes topics such as contract language, planning for negotiations, bargaining strategies, impasse and arbitration, contract maintenance, grievance procedures, and results of the negotiations.

EDL 535. Administration of Elementary School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of an elementary curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of elementary curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive K-5 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 536. Administration of Middle School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of the middle school level curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of middle school level curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive 6-8 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 537. Administration of Secondary School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of secondary curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of middle school level curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive 9-12 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 538. Auxiliary School Functions. 3 Credits.

Overview of school business and facilities management for educational administrators. Topics include: introduction to special area budgeting and accounting; insurance and risk management; forecasting; vendor relations; supervision of classified and support staff; management of support services, e.g., transportation, food service; facility operation and maintenance; and space utilization analysis, allocation; and cooperative community use of facilities.

EDL 571. School Community Relations. 3 Credits.

Study of the responsibility of classroom, attendance unit, and district personnel in public information efforts; design, use, and analysis of surveys; study of involvement of parents and other community members in resource, advisory, and decision-making activities; preparation of news releases and public information materials; study of relationships to media personnel. F,S.

EDL 572. Educational Systems and Planning. 3 Credits.

A study of the planning process including topics such as establishing goals; assessing needs; identifying resources; and generating, analyzing, and selecting alternatives. Processes and techniques in planning will be emphasized. SS.

EDL 573. Administration and Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study and critique of selected theories and research in administration and organizational behavior including topics such as leadership; formal and informal structure; communication; change and intervention; motivation and morale; interpersonal relations and conflict management; small-group processes; and personality, values, and ethics. F.

EDL 574. Administration and Organizational Behavior II. 3 Credits.

A continuation of Administration and Organizational Behavior I. Provides the student with the opportunity to design and carry out an original field study project in organizational behavior, participate in critiquing studies designed and completed by fellow students, and engage in individualized study in a topic area related to behavior in organizations.

EDL 575. Education and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of policy issues, analysis of policy formation, implementation analysis, and structures and actors in policy activity.

EDL 579. Special Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of educational leadership not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor. Repeatable.

EDL 589. Superintendency Series. 1 Credit.

Repeatable.

EDL 593. Internship in Educational Leadership. 1-8 Credits.

This is a culminating experience primarily for Specialist Diploma and doctoral students. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational, cognate, and major area coursework and consent of the advisor and instructor. Repeatable.

EDL 597. Readings in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor. Repeatable.

EDL 599. Individual Research in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

May be repeated. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor. Repeatable.

EDL 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

EDL 997. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

Independent Study. Repeatable to 4.00 credits.

EDL 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

EDL 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable to 12.00 credits.

EFR Courses

EFR 500. Introduction to the Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

A problem-centered class dialogue on those philosophical, social, political and historical concepts of educational thought that have shaped the development of the learning experience. F,S,SS.

EFR 501. Psychological Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

A study of the learning process with secondary emphasis on how the learning process is affected by individual differences, growth and development, and personality. A background in undergraduate Educational Psychology is assumed. Both theories of learning and theories of instruction are considered. SS.

EFR 502. Issues and Trends in Education. 3 Credits.

Examination of contemporary issues of pre-K-12 and higher education and some of the philosophical, political, social, and historical foundations which influence their development. Students will engage in public scholarship through issue advocacy projects. On demand.

EFR 503. History of American Education Policy and Reform. 3 Credits.

This course will explore major developments in the history of American education reform and policy. Students will consider the changing role and growing importance of public schools as social institutions, the different ways groups have sought to use schools to solve social problems, and how different generations of Americans have turned to education to define citizenship and merit, teach values, and assert and contest power. Present-day schools, policy debates, and reform initiatives are an outgrowth of this history. Throughout the course, students will identify salient moments of continuity and change in an attempt to make this past usable. On demand.

EFR 504. Philosophical Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

A study of the representative schools of thought which have structured major philosophies of education. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 505. Educational Equity and Social Change in Schooling. 3 Credits.

Students will study how education, and specifically schooling, has shifted with changing social and cultural conditions; and in response how schooling has been used as a means to assert social control over students and communities. Students will learn how schools are a place where inequitable social structures are both reproduced and can also be reformed. Students' final product demonstrates an application of these understandings related to a specific educational organization in the creation of a collaborative, action-oriented, product that reflects the goals of social change. On demand.

EFR 506. Multicultural Education. 3 Credits.

A review of the conceptual, historical and theoretical aspects of multicultural education. A major goal will be to provide educators with processes for incorporating multicultural education into educational environments; to meet the needs of culturally diverse students and to increase the cultural awareness and sensitivity of all students. North Dakota/Native American issues are primary elements of this course. On demand.

EFR 507. Gender, Sexuality and Education. 3 Credits.

A critical feminist analysis of the history, philosophy, theory, curriculum, and practice of education. The roles of educators, students, society, biology, and policy are considered in the education of those of diverse sexes, genders and sexualities. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor. On demand.

EFR 508. Advanced Ethnographic Methodology: Inquiry into Culture. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the central concepts and methods employed by cultural anthropologists in the study of educational processes. Students will explore Ethnography as a unique form of field work and develop awareness and competency in viewing education Ethnographically. Education in this context is understood as more than just formalized and institutional systems of schooling. Students will survey the historical and comparative perspectives which help distinguish between "education" and "schooling" as a form of cultural transmission, while examining issues of ethnicity, social reproduction and disjuncture, the importance of place, globalization and perceptions of modernity all within the context of education. On demand.

EFR 509. Introduction to Applied Educational Research. 3 Credits.

An introduction to applied research methodologies used to study education. The course covers quantitative as well as qualitative types of research. The paradigms of both types of research will be contrasted and the application of the methodologies in actual research investigated. F,S,SS.

EFR 510. Participatory Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Qualitative researchers engage in systematic inquiry and direct collaboration with individuals and communities to explore highly contextualized phenomenon with the purpose of action or change. Qualitative methods are naturalistic, highly contextual, participatory and relational. Exploring the lived experiences and perspective of others requires attention to relationships, rapport and trust among all participants. Students will learn fundamental community-based and participatory methods of data collection: observations, interviewing, as well as data analysis and writing up qualitative findings following case study design. On demand.

EFR 511. Program and Policy Evaluation. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary course which studies the theoretical models of program and policy evaluation as well as professional standards. Emphasis is on the analysis of models for implementation and application in various social and public policy fields, as well as education. On demand.

EFR 512. Survey Design and Analysis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to designing surveys for social science research with an emphasis on educational settings. Students gain theory and skills in survey construction, data collection, and data analysis. S, even years.

EFR 513. Large Dataset Management and Analysis. 3 Credits.

A study of educational and social science statistics involving gathering, managing, manipulation and analysis of large data sets, both local and national, using R. On demand.

EFR 514. Advanced Textual Analysis. 3 Credits.

In this advanced research seminar, students will learn about and conduct a variety of textual analyses including document analysis, archival research, content analysis and narrative inquiry. Researchers across the academy employ textual analysis methodologies and define "documents" in broad terms. Over the semester, students will examine these various approaches, learn about the value of texts, and conduct their own research. On demand.

EFR 515. Statistics I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to basic statistical methods, focusing primarily on descriptive statistics and inferential statistics up to and including two-way analysis of variance.

EFR 516. Statistics II. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of inferential statistics with primary emphasis on analysis of variance models, multiple regression techniques, analysis of covariance and other higher-order statistical procedures. Prerequisites: EFR 515 or consent of instructor. S,SS.

EFR 517. Advanced Research Methodologies. 3 Credits.

Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of research are considered for a variety of topics, including ethics in research, use of data banks, Q-methodology, survey research, Bayesian concepts, critical theory, longitudinal research and research consultation. Comprehensive examinations in educational research are addressed. This is a capstone course in educational research. Previous or concurrent involvement in research is highly desirable. Available for doctoral level students only.

EFR 518. Multivariate Analysis. 3 Credits.

Multiple regression in generalized problem solving; discriminant analysis, factor analysis, multivariate analysis, canonical analysis, and multivariate analysis of covariance. Students are encouraged to analyze their own data including student-generated computer applications.

EFR 519. Research Seminar. 1-4 Credits.

Experimental Design--An in-depth treatment of analysis of variance designs including factoral designs, treatment by subjects designs, groups within treatment designs, latin squares, higher dimensional designs, mixed effect designs, analysis of covariance, and trend analysis. Emphasis is placed on underlying linear models. Other seminars are held on specific research topics, particularly research proposals. May be repeated. Repeatable.

EFR 520. Translational and pluralistic designs in qualitative research. 3 Credits.

Translational and pluralistic designs are interdisciplinary approaches to constructing qualitative research with the intent to produce relevant inquires with individuals and communities and not upon them. Students gain foundational knowledge in phenomenology, grounded theory, narrative, and ethnographic designs. Students learn how to blend components of these designs to ensure inquiries are relevant, with the intent of disseminating knowledge to the people who can use it. Knowledge about IRB requirements will also be addressed. On demand.

EFR 522. Mixed-Methods Research. 3 Credits.

Mixed-methods research is the practice of combining quantitative and qualitative analysis within a single study. Students will learn the history and conceptual underpinnings of this methodological practice, read exemplary empirical studies that use mixed-methods, and explore the major mixed-methods designs. To apply these understandings, students will conduct a mixed-methods study on a topic of their own interests. Prerequisites: EFR 510 and EFR 516, or consent of instructor. S.

EFR 523. Structural Equation Modeling. 3 Credits.

This course builds from analyses underpinning structural equation modeling (SEM), such as reliability, exploratory factor analysis, and multiple regression, to SEM topics including path analysis, model specification and identification, goodness of fit, confirmatory factor analysis, structural models, mediation, multiple group invariance testing, and more. To apply these lessons, students will gain skills using SEM software. Prerequisite: EFR 516 or permission of the Instructor. On demand.

EFR 524. Needs Assessment. 3 Credits.

Needs assessment is a common evaluation method. This interdisciplinary course will study the concept of needs as well as the processes and techniques of conducting needs assessment. A set of techniques for implementation and application of needs assessment in various community, education, social work, public health, business/industry settings, government, and non-profit agencies will be reviewed. F.

EFR 525. International and Comparative Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of the major issues, concepts and methods of comparative and international education. Focuses on the development of the field, the uses of comparison, the impact of globalization, and policy and practice development around the world at all levels of education. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 527. Education Policy: Theories & Research. 3 Credits.

In this course, students will explore the theories, approaches and methodologies that undergird policy research on all levels of education. Students will explore various education debates and the reforms, practices and policies that stem from them. Students will consider the role of policy as a pathway or barrier to social justice and the various ways researchers study and engage with policy. On demand.

EFR 530. Learning Analytics. 3 Credits.

Learning analytics is the collection, management, analysis, and reporting of meaningful patterns in data about learners, aimed at optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs. This course will provide students with the building blocks of learning analytics, including history, concepts and theories, question development, common data sources, tools and techniques, challenges, ethics, applications, case studies, and presenting to educational audiences for decision-making. F, even years.

EFR 535. Data Analytics and Visualization with R. 3 Credits.

R is an increasingly popular, open-source programming language with powerful packages for data analytics and visualization. In this course, students will first master the fundamentals of R, including installation, programming techniques, reading data files, and basic statistics. The fundamentals of data visualization will then be covered, such as theory, applications, and examples. Finally, students will develop skills in data visualization techniques using R packages. Prerequisite or Corequisite: EFR 515 or equivalent. S, even years.

EFR 584. Internship in Educational Research. 1-8 Credits.

Practical experience in the conduct of educational research, analyzing data, and writing reports. Available for doctoral level students only. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Appropriate coursework in educational research and consent of the adviser and department chair. Repeatable.

EFR 590. Special Topics in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of education not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor. Repeatable.

EFR 591. Readings in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor. Repeatable.

EFR 592. Individual Research in Education. 1-4 Credits.

May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor. Repeatable.

EFR 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

The scholarly project demonstrates critical analysis and application of information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. The project allows students to demonstrate scholarly skills in an integrated manner. The scholarly project must be approved by the student's adviser. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's advisor. S/U grading. On demand.

EFR 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

EFR 997. Independent Study M Ed & M S. 2 Credits.

EFR 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

EFR 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable to 15.00 credits.

SPED Courses

SPED 500. Introduction to Visual Impairment. 3 Credits.

A course which provides an overview of the field of visual impairment to include the following areas of emphases: History/Philosophy; Service-delivery models; medical, psychological and educational implications of partial vision or total blindness; curricula methods and materials; current issues/trends. F.

SPED 501. Diseases and Function of the Eye. 2 Credits.

A course which introduces students to: a) the structural parts of the eye and its functions; b) common ocular conditions and diseases; c) educational implications; d) interpretation of medical eye examination reports; and e) the development of the human visual system. F.

SPED 502. Braille Reading and Writing. 2 Credits.

In this course students learn: 1) to read and write the literary code of grade 2 braille and 2) to teach the literary code of grade 2 braille to students of all ages. Prerequisites: Must demonstrate proficiency in Braille Code I and Braille Code II, or, must enroll in Braille Code II and Braille Reading and Writing concurrently. S.

SPED 503. Orientation and Mobility/Visual Impairment. 2 Credits.

This course introduces students to basic orientation and mobility techniques used by specialists when working with individuals with low vision and blindness. Concept development, kinesiology, tactile map construction, dog guides, electronic mobility devices and parental involvement are topics covered with respect to various populations (i.e., infants, school-age children, and adults). S.

SPED 504. Communication Media and Methods/Visual Impairment. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the communication devices and adaptive technology used by individuals with low vision and blindness. Students learn to read and write the braille codes for mathematics and music, do basic calculations on the abacus, brailler and talking calculator and gain familiarity with computers and software currently used in the field. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. F.

SPED 505. Low Vision Assessment and Remediation. 3 Credits.

A course which focuses on children who have severe visual deficits but with proper training are able to utilize their vision for learning. Effects of low vision are studied with respect to psychological/sociological development, academic learning, skills of independent living, and vocational choice. Methods of assessing visual function are examined with emphasis on adaptions needed in the educational settings. Optical and non-optical aids are compared and evaluated. F.

SPED 506. Introduction to Emotional Behavioral Disorders. 3 Credits.

The historical perspective and the complexities of identification and characteristics of emotional disorders will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multisystems approach. F,S,SS.

SPED 507. Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities. 3 Credits.

The historical perspectives and the complexities of identification and characteristics of developmental/cognitive disabilities will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multi-systems approach. F,S,SS.

SPED 508. Introduction to Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

The historical perspective and the complexities of identification and characteristics of learning disabilities will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multisystems approach. F,S,SS.

SPED 509. IEP Development. 2 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the individualized education plan (IEP) process, including an understanding of how to develop and write effective IEPs for students with disabilities. In addition, the IEP template and process used by the state of North Dakota (i.e., TIENET) will be addressed.

SPED 510. Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the field of Early Childhood Special Education, primarily for students interested in entering the field. Issues such as program design, parent involvement, identification, infant education, and effects of disabilities will be covered. F,S,SS.

SPED 511. Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles and procedures for screening, identifying and evaluating young children with special needs. Emphasis will be placed on exposing students to available assessment instruments and providing opportunities for actual testing of preschoolers. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 512. Methods and Materials for Preschool Children with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of curricula, program development and evidence-based intervention strategies for including young children (ages three to six) with special needs in early childhood settings. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. S.

SPED 513. Special Education Resident Teacher Internship. 1 Credit.

This is a culminating field experience for students admitted into the Special Education Resident Teacher Program in the areas of emotional behavior disorders, intellectual disabilities, and learning disabilities. This course is designed for Resident Teachers (RTs) to synthesize information gleaned in coursework while they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: Full admission into the Special Education Resident Teacher Program and consent of instructor. F,S.

SPED 514. Intervention Strategies with Infants and Toddlers. 3 Credits.

This course provides for study into the unique needs of infants and toddlers with disabilities as well as the delivery of intervention services to the very young child with disabilities and his/her family. SS.

SPED 515. Professional Development. 1 Credit.

This course will provide an orientation to the roles and responsibilities of being a resident teacher in special education. Restricted to resident teachers in special education.

SPED 516. Collaborative Authentic Assessment in Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to evaluate the historical perspectives and philosophical basis of early intervention; rationale for early intervention; link between assessment, intervention, and evaluation; early interactions between the developing child and the environment; normal developmental sequences and atypical development. Specific emphasis will be placed on the role of authentic assessment within the paradigm of supporting infants, toddlers and their families through everyday activities. S.

SPED 521. IEP and the Transition Process. 3 Credits.

This course covers the development of a federally mandated Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for students identified with one of the 13 disability areas as defined by IDEA. Additionally, this course focuses on education, personal, and vocational transition for students with disabilities. Assessment and transition program planning will be covered along with interagency collaboration skills and career awareness. F,S,SS.

SPED 522. Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Historical and evolutionary research, theories, and philosophies for understanding the developmental and social-emotional needs of the more able child from early childhood through adolescence in educational experiences. Characteristics of G/T learners in the intellectual, leadership, academic, and creative realms; asynchrony; stereotypes; comorbidities; issues surrounding the identification of G/T learners. Cultural and societal influences on the field; educational trends. Prerequisite: TL 315 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 523. Assessment in Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Formal and informal assessments of characteristics of G/T learners in the intellectual, leadership, academic, and creative realms for identification and qualification for educational programming; assessment of readiness and content mastery. Ongoing assessment, progress monitoring, and data interpretation skills will be practiced. Issues surrounding the identification of G/T learners, including misdiagnosis, stereotyping, and bias will be critically evaluated. Legal issues surrounding this area, and cultural influences on data sources will be explored. Prerequisite: TL 315, and T&L 423 or SPED 551, or permission of the instructor.

SPED 524. Teaching Methods in Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Methodological and pedagogical approaches for fulfilling the unique academic, intellectual, creative, social, and emotional needs of the more able child in the educational environment. Exploration and analysis of contributing research, theories, and philosophies for designing differentiated learning opportunities from early childhood through adolescence via multiple modes (i.e. Bloom's Taxonomy, Multiple Intelligence's, technologies, multicultural and creative materials, etc.); educational trends through curriculum design and the integration of formal and informal assessment data and national/state standards to create individualized learning goals through curriculum compacting, tiering, acceleration, academic planning, modifications, and mentorships. Exploration and analysis of curriculum models to suit various learning needs of the asynchronous child with multiple forms of exceptionality (LD, ED, ASD, ELL); legal, cultural, and stereotype issues affecting the implementation of enriched curriculum for the G/T child with comorbidities. Prerequisite: SPED 522.

SPED 525. Legal/Ethical Aspects in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course covers the theory and study of special education law for children youth with disabilities. F,S,SS.

SPED 528. Advanced Assistive Technology. 1 Credit.

This course covers the types and functions of assistive technology for students with disabilities across a variety of settings, e.g., home, schools and community. Assistive technology assessment and a working knowledge of best practices of assistive technology in the lives of students will be addressed. Identification of funding sources and assistive technology resources will also be covered.

SPED 530. Braille Code 1. 2 Credits.

Students will complete seven initial self-paced learning units (chapters) consisting of lessons that will lead them to being a proficient Braille reader and writer. F.

SPED 531. Braille Code 2. 2 Credits.

Students will complete four final self-paced learning units (chapters) consisting of lessons that will lead them to being a proficient Braille reader and writer. Prerequisite: Must demonstrate proficiency in Braille Code I to enroll in Braille Code II. S.

SPED 532. Visual Impairment/Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

This course covers the purpose and principles of early intervention. It addresses the developmental needs of young children with visual impairments and effective strategies to meet those needs. It also covers the role of teachers of students with visual impairment in the early intervention program as well as key aspects of consultation, interdisciplinary collaboration, service coordination, and culturally sensitive family-centered services. S.

SPED 533. Technology for Visual Impairment. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of assistive technology used by individuals who are blind or visually impaired. Specific topics include accessibility (e.g., Windows, Mac, IOS, Android), accessing mobile apps, accessing book and print materials, and other technology for users who are blind or visually impaired. S.

SPED 540. Concepts and Principles in Behavior Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course introduces definitions, characteristics, principles, processes and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis. In addition, the philosophical assumptions and dimensions of the science of applied behavior analysis, including determinism, empiricism, parsimony, selectionism, pragmatism, and lawfulness of behavior will be addressed. Students will learn to differentiate between environmental and mentalistic explanations of behavior, and between conceptual, experimental, and applied analyses of behavior. F,S,SS.

SPED 541. Methods and Applications in Behavior Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course addresses behaviorally-based strategies to establish, strengthen, and weaken target behaviors. Fundamental elements of behavior change are reviewed, with a focus on selecting evidence-based tactics that utilize basic principles of behavior (reinforcement, punishment, extinction, and stimulus control), as well as utilizing appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement and punishment. Various procedures combining fundamental behavior principles are reviewed, modeled, practiced, and demonstrated to mastery and fluency. F,S,SS.

SPED 542. Ethical and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts. 3 Credits.

This course introduces ethical and professional considerations relevant in the professional practice of applied behavior analysis as well as the ethical and disciplinary standards of the profession. Students will become familiar with the ethical and professional conduct and legal issues relevant to Board Certified Behavior Analyst-level practitioners, as well as the professional conduct consistent with the practice of applied behavior analysis. F,S,SS.

SPED 543. Applied Behavior Analysis Supervision Across Settings and Populations. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on client-centered responsibilities across settings, including identification of the problem and selection and implementation of interventions based on biological, medical, and environmental variables. The course will also address management of behavioral services and supervision of those responsible for carrying out behavior change procedures. F,S,SS.

SPED 544. Research Methods in Behavior Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the measurement of behavior and the analysis of intervention effect using single-subject experimental design. Procedures for collection and display of behavioral data are demonstrated, practiced, and examined for reliability, validity, efficiency, and relevance to a variety of settings, with a focus on educational environments. Individualized measurement procedures are developed and implemented using a variety of single-subject design formats, and the contribution of single-subject research design to education, clinical practice, and scientific inquiry is examined. Ethical considerations of experimental analysis are examined. F,S,SS.

SPED 545. Assessment and Behavior Change Systems. 4 Credits.

This course will address the process of identifying behaviors targeted for change and the use of behavioral assessment techniques to identify and analyze behavior-environment relations for the purpose of developing successful, functionally-based intervention strategies. Students will learn a variety of methods for behavior assessment, interventions, analysis of interventions, experimental analysis, and interpreting outcomes including the use of practical behaviorally-based assessment tools such as checklists, rating scales, structured observation tools, and curricular assessments. F,S,SS.

SPED 546. Philosophical Underpinnings of Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the philosophical underpinnings of behavior analysis. Radical behaviorism will be discussed in depth as it relates to many topics including verbal behavior, creativity, reasoning, and thinking. F,S,SS.

SPED 550. Foundations of Special Education with Emphasis in ASD, EBD, ID, and LD. 3 Credits.

The course provides an introduction to perspectives and policies for identifying and supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), learning disabilities (LD), emotional behavioral disorders (EBD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within special education based on a multi-systems approach. The course addresses aspects of diversity for individuals with exceptionalities and their families, and how these complex issues can interact with the delivery of educational and related services. Effective communication and collaboration models are emphasized through a culturally responsive lens. The course is designed around reflective thinking and critical analysis of varied issues related to the provision of quality lifelong supports such as characteristics, prevalence, etiology and educational impact. F,S,SS.

SPED 551. Advanced Assessment in Special Education. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of assessment, including formal and informal procedures for screening, identification and assessment of students with disabilities. Practical assignment included. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 552. Inclusive Methods. 3 Credits.

The study of a variety of methods and materials for teaching and assessing children and youth with learning and behavior problems in the general education classroom.

SPED 554. Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

The study of specific strategies, methods, and materials for working with students with learning disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 555. Advanced Methods: Emotional Behavioral Disorders. 3 Credits.

The study of specific strategies, methods, and materials for working with students with emotional behavioral disorders. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 556. Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilities. 3 Credits.

This course is a masters level methods course designed for professionals seeking to extend their skills in the areas of instruction, functional (life skills) curriculum, program and curriculum development, and functional behavioral analysis for working with students with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. Prerequisites: Graduate status and admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 557. Progress Monitoring. 3 Credits.

This course covers all aspects of progress monitoring including what it is, how it works, the benefits of progress monitoring, various ways and strategies for conducting progress monitoring and how it functions in a Response to Intervention (RTI) model. Students will learn how to track students in reading, math, and written language by collecting data and then using that data to measure student progress and in instructional decision-making. The strongest research-based strategy for progress monitoring, curriculum-based measurement, will be covered in depth. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 558. Response to Intervention. 2 Credits.

This course will address common elements of Response to Intervention (RTI) including definition, components of successful RTI models, establishing RTI teams and building capacity for school-wide RTI implementation, the use of standard protocol in RTI implementation, monitoring progress in academics and behavior within RTI models, understanding guidelines for problem-solving/decision making in RTI, as well as the future direction of RTI. F,SS.

SPED 560. ASD: Foundations and Brain Based Differences. 3 Credits.

This is the foundational course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and brain based differences associated with a diagnosis of ASD. The focus is to engage learners in reflective thinking and critical analysis of the impact of brain based differences associated with ASD. F,S,SS.

SPED 561. Methods for Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

This is a required course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to address commonly implemented intervention strategies, particularly those considered to be evidence based or research supported in the field of ASD. This course examines the current literature base supporting various interventions and strategies with a focus on matching the needs and strengths of individuals with ASD to the most appropriate intervention method based on data driven practice and research support for a particular intervention. F,S,SS.

SPED 562. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

This course is in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Issues related to parental reactions to diagnosis, stressors at home and school, strategies for empowering families, transitional situations for individuals with ASD, transitions to jobs and college, and legal issues will be explored. The central purpose of the course is threefold: a) to provide current information related to the chronic stressors experienced by caregivers and/or family members of persons with ASD; b) to provide current information regarding career/vocational options related to transitions from high school through adult life; and c) to provide current information regarding legal issues related to the provision of lifelong supports for persons with ASD. Prerequisite: Completed degree from a related field of study. S.

SPED 563. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Medical Issues and Trends. 3 Credits.

This course is in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this course is to examine the historical perspective and complexities of the role of medicine and medically oriented interventions for individuals with ASD. Issues will be explored related to conducting wellness examinations, current and future medication treatments, genetics, collaboration, and resources. Prerequisite: A completed degree from a related field of study. S.

SPED 564. ASD: Structured Teaching. 3 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to learn and apply the TEACCH methods with fidelity. There is a focus on the design and implementation of visually supported instruction. This method can be applied to instruction for individuals both with and without ASD. F.

SPED 565. ASD: Level 1 Supports and Foundations. 3 Credits.

This course is in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD), specifically regarding individuals without an accompanying intellectual impairment. This includes those requiring level 1 supports such as high functioning autism, Asperger syndrome, or ASD requiring lower levels of support. Assessment, functional analysis, evidence-based practices, and transition will be addressed. Prerequisite: A completed degree from a related field of study. SS.

SPED 566. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Intensive Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) birth to age six. Topics addressed will include basic characteristics of young children with ASD, the developmental implications for the children and their families, and research-supported early interventions utilizing a family-centered approach with an emphasis on natural learning opportunities. Prerequisite: A completed degree from a related field of study. F,SS.

SPED 567. Assessment in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

This course is a required course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This course will address the entire process of program planning for students with ASD including screening, evaluative assessment, ongoing assessment, using assessment to guide intervention planning, and monitoring progress. Students will explore a variety of methods and tools commonly used with individuals with ASD; specifically, standardized assessments, checklists, rating scales, structured observation tools, and curricular based assessments. Its central focus is on assessing the ongoing needs and strengths of individuals with ASD in order to plan successful interventions in further differentiating instruction. S,SS.

SPED 570. The Educational Diagnostician. 3 Credits.

This course studies the roles and responsibilities of an educational diagnostician in a school district and/or special education unit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Education program or permission of instructor. On demand.

SPED 571. Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Assessment Measures in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course is focused on social, emotional, and behavior assessment measures used in special education. Both informal and formal measures are embedded to obtain multiple perspectives for effective school programming. Assessment practices are situated within the federal special education law and culminate with a comprehensive assessment report. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Education program or permission of instructor. On demand.

SPED 572. Achievement Assessment Measures in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course is focused on achievement assessment measures used in special education specific to reading, written language, and mathematics. Both formal and informal measures are embedded for individualized school programming based on federal special education law. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Education program or permission of instructor. On demand.

SPED 578. Behavior Management. 3 Credits.

The study of a variety of effective behavior management and assessment techniques appropriate to the needs of children and youth with special needs. Topics include procedures to increase self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, self-esteem, and assessment procedures and techniques for determining behavioral needs. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 579. Internship: Behavioral Intervention Specialist. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of special education. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. F,S,SS.

SPED 580. Practicum: Special Education. 1-6 Credits.

Practicum in the study of children and adolescents with disabilities in school and related settings. Repeatable to 15.00 credits. F,S,SS.

SPED 581. Internship: General Special Education. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of special education. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. F,S,SS.

SPED 582. Internship: Educational Diagnostician. 1-4 Credits.

Professional practice as an educational diagnostician in an approved educational setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Education program or permission of instructor. Repeatable to 4.00 credits. On demand.

SPED 583. Internship: Autism Spectrum Disorder. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of autism spectrum disorders. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 560, SPED 561, and consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits.

SPED 584. Internship: Gifted/Talented. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of gifted/talented. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 522, SPED 523, and SPED 524, or consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits.

SPED 585. Internship: Visual Impairment. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students who are seeking licensure or an endorsement in the area of visual impairment. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Repeatable up to 6 credits maximum. Prerequisites: SPED 500, SPED 501, SPED 502, and consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. F,S,SS.

SPED 586. Internship: Emotional Behavioral Disorders. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of emotional behavioral disorders. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. F,S.

SPED 587. Internship: Intellectual Disabilities. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of Intellectual disabilities. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. F,S.

SPED 588. Internship: Learning Disabilities. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of learning disabilities. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. S,SS.

SPED 589. Internship: Early Childhood Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students who are seeking licensure or an endorsement in the area of early childhood special education. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 510, SPED 511 and SPED 512, and consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 4.00 credits.

SPED 590. Special Topics in Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of special education. May be repeated for different topics. Repeatable to 30.00 credits.

SPED 591. Readings: Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Repeatable. F,S,SS.

SPED 593. Independent Project: Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and Instructor. Repeatable.

SPED 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

The scholarly project demonstrates critical analysis and application of information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. The project allows students to demonstrate scholarly skills in an integrated manner that is directly related to their roles as teachers, program evaluators, and action researchers. The scholarly project must be approved by the student's advisor. F,S,SS.

SPED 997. Independent Study Report. 2 Credits.

Independent study and preparation of a written report for students taking the non-thesis option in the Master's program. F,S,SS.

T&L Courses

T&L 500. The Professional Teacher. 3 Credits.

This class is an introduction to the study of education. It will provide students the opportunity to explore the many facets of the teaching profession and to consider its value as a personal career choice. The course will study current issues and trends in education to include curricular and instructional planning, creating a positive learning environment, addressing diverse learners, and the professional skills and responsibilities of teachers. Through reflection on the teacher, the learner, the subject matter, and the context within one teaches, the student will begin to develop a personal philosophy of teaching and learning. Prerequisite: Admission to Master of Science in Curriculum Instruction. F.

T&L 511. Assessment in ECE. 3 Credits.

This course examines the construct and practice of assessment for teaching in birth to third-grade learning environments. The course considers the critical issues related to assessment and accountability in schools, focusing on why assessment is necessary, who the various assessment audiences are, what kind of assessment information is useful for each, and the time frame appropriate for such assessment information. Students study a variety of assessment methods currently used to evaluate teaching and learning in classrooms. They also discuss ways to communicate formative information about student progress to families, collaborate with colleagues to use assessment results to modify grade-level curricula for children with diverse abilities, and advocate for culturally, linguistically, and developmentally-appropriate forms of assessment. S.

T&L 513. Linguistics for ELL Teachers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the complexities of human language through the study of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Additional topics addressed include the brain and language, history of the English language, psycholinguistics, writing systems and language in social contexts. SS.

T&L 514. Introduction to Multilingual Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores language education models, programs and policies with an emphasis on English language learners (ELLs). Political, legal, historical, and cultural contexts of multilingual education will be discussed with a focus on both U.S. and global challenges.

T&L 515. Middle School Curriculum. 3 Credits.

This course examines the middle school curriculum and instructional strategies as well as the needs of early adolescents. The course focuses on the roles teachers play in incorporating a guided, interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. The studies include the components of curriculum teaming, advisory, exploration, learning communities) and instruction (differentiation, cooperative learning, learning styles, instructional strategies) incorporated in middle schools.

T&L 516. Philosophy and Foundations of Middle School Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historical and philosophical background of middle level education. The focus is on the roles teachers/administrators play in incorporating this guided, interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach that assists students during these fundamentally transformative years. The course looks at the philosophical aspect of the curriculum and instructional component. The studies explore contemporary issues associated with the middle school as well as the adaptations necessary for special circumstances affiliated with middle schools.

T&L 517. Social Emotional Learning & Guidance. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to offer strategies for caregivers to support young children's positive social and emotional development, behavior, and learning through the exploration of how early experiences shape development. The emotional and social development of children, including the causes, expressions, prevention and management of challenging behaviors in all children birth to age eight are examined. Emphasis is placed on caregiver/family/child relationships, positive emotional/social environments, developmental implications, adverse childhood risk factors, and intervention strategies. Students will identify factors influencing emotional/social development, utilize screening measures, and design positive behavioral supports. SS.

T&L 518. Curriculum and Methods for Teaching STEM. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing inquiry-based science and engineering design in PK - 12th grade classrooms. Course activities include readings and resources that delve into STEM curriculum, pedagogy, best practices, hands-on activities, exploring strategies to meet the needs of diverse learners, and using STEM assessments to inform instruction. F,S.

T&L 519. Social Studies in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing social studies in elementary classrooms.

T&L 520. Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School. 4 Credits.

A study of processes for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum and improving instruction in elementary schools.

T&L 521. Differentiated Instruction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the principles of differentiated instruction. Topics of study include: brain-based learning, responsive instructional and assessment strategies, linking curriculum standards to learner needs, organizing and managing a differentiated classroom, and relevant resources for implementation.

T&L 522. Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing inquiry-based math in elementary classrooms.

T&L 523. Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the foundations of teaching English language and literacy to English Language Learners (ELLs). Topics will include practices for reading and writing instruction, vocabulary development, assessment of reading and writing, choosing literature for ELLs, and the incorporation of media and technology in ELL literacy instruction. SS.

T&L 524. Reading in the Content Areas. 2 Credits.

How and why reading should be taught in the content areas (i.e. Social Studies, Science, Mathematics, etc.). Research studies in the field of content reading and a variety of instructional practices are reviewed.

T&L 525. Writing in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course examines writing as a process that is developmental, cultural, social, and individual. Emphasis is on effective implementation of the essential structures of writing workshop and on monitoring and assessing writers' growth.

T&L 526. Play in Development and Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores the role of play in cognitive, physical and social-emotional development, and the way in which play is incorporated into educational and other programmatic settings. Students will explore how assessment of play indicates a child's development, and they will use assessment to promote Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) for PreK-Grade 3 (ages 3-8) learners.

T&L 527. Curricular Foundations in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historical, philosophical, cultural, race, class, and gender influences on curriculum in early childhood, including the philosophy and mission of the Department of Teaching and Learning.

T&L 528. Children's and Young Adult Literature in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course explores the major area of literature for children and young adults in response to two questions: What is the range of literature available for children and young adults today? In what ways might children's and young adult literature be used in the classroom to promote culturally-relevant literature and literacy growth?. SS.

T&L 529. Language Development & Cognition in Children. 3 Credits.

This course provides foundational information about language and cognitive development in children. The course content will also analyze typical and atypical language and cognitive development. The focus of the course will include children birth to age eight. .

T&L 530. Foundations of Reading Instruction. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the relationship between reading theory, research, contemporary issues and instructional practice. Emphasis is placed on strategic systems related to effective reading, instructional approaches that support the development of these strategic systems and assessment as collecting evidence of effective reading behaviors. F,S.

T&L 531. Early Literacy Development and Instruction. 3 Credits.

A study of early literacy processes including phonemic and print awareness, word recognition, comprehension, and writing. Emphasis is on reviewing current research and theory, assessment and instruction practices, and bridging language and literacy development in literacy rich environments.

T&L 532. Leading K-12 Educator Learning. 3 Credits.

This course overviews the theories and approaches to instructional coaching and teacher leadership to support educational program visions, goals and institutional commitment as a way to transform schools into organizations focused on accelerated teacher effectiveness and improved student learning. It prepares teachers to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for effective teacher leadership and coaching. On demand.

T&L 533. Secondary English Language Arts & Literacy Instruction. 3 Credits.

This graduate level course explores teaching literacy in the English Language Arts middle and high school classroom. Students will explore how the traditional and contemporary approaches to teaching literature, nonfiction, and digital media work to support the advanced literacy goals of reading, writing, listening and speaking for adolescents. Students will explore Language Arts instructional methods and develop curriculum in the areas of literature, writer's workshop, academic inquiry, language vocabulary, and digital literacy. Students will also explore the ways the literacy program is supported and assessed throughout the entire secondary school. SS.

T&L 534. Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation. 2 Credits.

Focuses on common causes of reading disability, methods of diagnosis, and corrective reading programs in the classroom. Corequisite: T&L 583.

T&L 535. Advanced Reading/Language Arts Diagnosis and Remediation. 2 Credits.

Analysis of interrelationships of learning difficulties in language arts areas and procedures for remediation. Prerequisites: T&L 530 and T&L 534.

T&L 536. Innovations in English Language Arts Instruction. 3 Credits.

This course considers the current curricular trends and research-based best practices in teaching English Language Arts. Students will critically examine and apply current instructional approaches in teaching English language and vocabulary, classroom discourse practices, and digital literacies. We will consider the ways various instructional methods support the advancement of literacy development for all students, considering ways to modify and adapt curriculum to meet the cultural and linguistic diversity of today's classrooms. On demand.

T&L 537. ELL Methods and Materials. 3 Credits.

This course explores current methods and materials in ELL education, with a focus on teaching academic language and sheltered content instruction. F,S,SS.

T&L 538. Supervision of Student Teaching. 2 Credits.

For supervisors and directors of student teaching in colleges and cooperating schools. Principles and practices on how to provide the most beneficial experiences for student teachers.

T&L 539. College Teaching. 3 Credits.

Explores learning styles and teaching styles, the components and responsibilities involved in college teaching, methods of teaching and motivating students, and current issues related to instruction in the college classroom.

T&L 540. Theory and Philosophies of Curriculum in Schools. 3 Credits.

This course explores the historical development of the K-12 curriculum, the philosophical and theoretical aspects applied to curriculum, and the social conditions that impact curriculum.

T&L 542. Models of Teaching. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on various models of teaching: social interaction, information-processing, inquiry and behavioral. The purpose of the course is to provide teachers with a variety of instructional models related to meaningful learning experiences for students.

T&L 543. Scholarly Writing. 3 Credits.

Designed to assist students with learning the art of scholarly writing, this course will aid students in designing, formatting, and completing research-based and other scholarly writing projects, as well as understanding the rules and norms of academic publishing.

T&L 545. Adult Learners. 3 Credits.

This course will cover theories of adult development, current research on adult learners, ways of assessing the needs and interests of adult learners, and ways of creating environments in which adult learners can thrive.

T&L 546. College Students with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

This course explores the range of special needs college students bring to campus and how faculty, staff, and administrators might appropriately meet those needs. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Graduate Studies or instructor permission. S.

T&L 547. Technology in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Students will examine the various uses and integration of technology and media in higher education by faculty in their attempt to engage learners with each other, the course content, and with instructors.

T&L 548. The Professoriate. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of the development of the American professoriate by way of historical, scholarly, popular, and contemporary perspectives. It also examines the transition of new faculty members to their initial academic appointment.

T&L 549. Doctoral Seminar. 1 Credit.

The doctoral seminar focuses on specific topics related to teaching, learning, and leadership. Specific course content includes the requirements and expectations for completing the doctoral program and writing a successful dissertation. S/U grading. SS.

T&L 550. Assessment and Evaluation in ELL Education. 3 Credits.

This course combines readings and theoretical discussion of assessment with hands-on experience in assessing ELLs. Students will learn how to use a variety of formal and informal assessments with a focus on how to use assessment data in planning instruction. Topics will include classroom-based assessments, language proficiency testing, testing accommodations for ELLs, and assessment of ELLs for special education and gifted education, and ELL program evaluation.

T&L 551. Second Language Acquisition for ELL Teachrs. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the socio- and psycho-linguisitic aspects of interlanguage by studying the theories and research of first and second language acquisition. Students will examine the nature of learners and their individual differences during the stages of language development, with a focus on children and K-12 classrooms.

T&L 552. Online Teaching Practice & Innovation. 3 Credits.

This course examines contemporary online teaching practices and has a focus on "small" research-based teaching strategies that have an impactful effect on online classroom engagement and learning. F, even years.

T&L 553. Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community. 3 Credits.

A course appropriate for anyone working with families, early childhood educators, general educators, special educators, related service personnel, administrators and outside agency personnel. Topics covered include: (1) the various models of collaboration and consultation and the stages of each; (2) communication skills; (3) problem-solving; (4) conflict management; (5) diverse perspectives; (6) information collection procedures; (7) supervisory skills; (8) family characteristics and structure across the lifespan; (9) family focused intervention; (10) school choices; and (11) school issues such as poverty, domestic violence, teasing, bullying, and school violence.

T&L 554. Nature of Science and Science Education. 3 Credits.

T&L 554 surveys issues that are central to science education and research through an exploration of the works of twentieth century philosophers of science who were the most influential in shaping thinking about science in the education community. Course discussion is guided by relevant readings from history and philosophy of science, and science education. F.

T&L 555. Issues of Motivation and Equity in STEM Education. 3 Credits.

Examines how the intersection of gender, culture, and societal stereotypes impact student motivation in STEM education. This examination highlights how comingling factors shape not only perceptions of science knowledge but of membership and participation in STEM learning communities. In this course, we will focus on strategies that reduce barriers and increase representation, relevance, and responsiveness in STEM classrooms in order to raise student motivation. S.

T&L 556. Constructivism in STEM Teaching and Learning. 3 Credits.

Delves into issues of teaching and learning with a focus on perspectives about how learners construct complex understandings, including core ideas in STEM. Relevant readings from science and mathematics education are explored. The course offers participants an opportunity to apply practices discussed by positioning them as interviewers to probe learners' conceptions of a STEM topic. S.

T&L 558. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab1:Solids. 2 Credits.

T&L 559A. MS Sci.Eng-2: Solids. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: T&L 558, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 559B. MS Sci.Eng-2: Solids. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: T&L 558, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 560. Computer Science for Teachers I. 4 Credits.

An introduction to computer science, with problem solving, algorithm development, and structured programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on learning how to design, code, debug, and document programs, using techniques of good programming style. Includes laboratory. Meets with CS 160. Prerequisite: Admission to the Computer Science Education Graduate Certificate Program. F,S,SS.

T&L 561. Computer Science for Teachers II. 4 Credits.

A broadening of foundations for computer science with advanced concepts in computer programming. Includes an introduction to data structures, analysis of algorithms, and the theory of computation. Includes laboratory. Meets with CS 161. Prerequisites: Admission to the Computer Science Education Graduate Certificate Program and T&L 560.

T&L 562. Specialized Methods: Computer Science. 2 Credits.

This course for current K-12 educators explores computer science as a discipline that encourages inquiry, creativity, and collaboration. Given that the nature of computing is investigative, the computer science activities will be hands-on to gain insights about teaching and learning computing concepts in classroom settings. Students will examine a variety of computing tools, virtual environments, and other instructional resources that support learning across STEM disciplines. Students will learn that pedagogical methods in computer science require intellectual rigor in order to develop lessons that are relevant to secondary students and pertinent to our culturally diverse world today. Prerequisite: T&L 560. Prerequisite or Corequisite: T&L 561. SS.

T&L 563. K-12 Classroom Based Coaching Practices. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the professional learning and growth of an instructional coach in the K-12 educational setting. Individuals will develop and practice instructional coaching skills of leading a coaching cycle, providing feedback on instruction, leading assessment data dialogue, and facilitating difficult conversations focused on instructional improvement. Prerequisite: T&L 532. On demand.

T&L 564. Designing Professional Development for K-12 Educators. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on developing the knowledge and skills required for designing and leading professional development for K-12 teachers. Individuals will develop a professional development plan aimed to directly support the professional learning of teachers and key school personnel. Prerequisite or Corequisite: T&L 532. On demand.

T&L 565. K-12 Instructional Coaching Clinical. 3 Credits.

This course is a supervised instructional coaching clinical experience and presents an opportunity for students to apply the skills and concepts of effective instructional coaching and professional development in an educational setting. Prerequisites: T&L 532, T&L 563, and T&L 564. On demand.

T&L 566. Brain in Memory and Learning. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: Admissions to Grad School.

T&L 567. Language Structure and Analysis for ELL Teachers. 3 Credits.

This course explores the grammatical and discourse structures of the modern English language, analysis of grammar and discourse with a focus on specific problem areas for ELLs, and pedagogical implications for English language development.

T&L 568. Research and Advocacy in TESOL. 3 Credits.

This course prepares teachers to both understand and conduct research in TESOL. Emphasis will be placed on using research data to advocate for changes and improvement in ELL education.

T&L 569. Action Research. 3 Credits.

The study of the philosophy and methods of action research. Emphasis is focused on analysis of and reflection on one's teaching for the purpose of improvements in student learning. Prerequisite: Graduate status. S.

T&L 570. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience. 3 Credits.

Course topics include Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), social-emotional foundations in early childhood development, resilience, family engagement strategies, and characteristics of children with behavioral disorders in schools. This course is appropriate for anyone working with families, early childhood educators, general educators, special educators, related service personnel, administrators and outside agency personnel. F,S.

T&L 571. Teacher Education: Focus on the Teacher. 3 Credits.

Practices, issues, and trends in the design and implementation and assessment of programs for the preparation and development of K-12 teachers. F, even years.

T&L 572. Teacher Education: Focus on the Learner. 3 Credits.

The study of teacher education in relation to the lives of P-12 students. This course includes the examination of children and their lives through aspects of race, religion, socioeconomics, linguistics and age, and considers educational implications for preservice and inservice teachers.

T&L 573. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab2:Liq/Gas. 2 Credits.

T&L 574. MS Sci.Eng-4: Liquid/Gas. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: T&L 573, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 575. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab3:Mot/Elec. 2 Credits.

T&L 576A. MS Sci.Eng.-6:Motion/Electric. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: T&L 575, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher Licensure and employment as a teacher in a ND school.

T&L 576B. MS Sci.Eng.-6:Motion/Electric. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: T&L 576A.

T&L 577. Assessment of Learning. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the theory and practice of assessment, specifically the process of gathering and discussing information from multiple and diverse sources in order to develop a deep understanding of what students know, understand, and can do with their knowledge as a result of educational experiences.

T&L 578. Curriculum and Pedagogy in Indigenous Education. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine Indigenous ways of thinking, knowing, and learning through culturally responsive, and culturally driven pedagogy. The students will study both the theory and practical learning environment applications of indigenous knowledge systems, culturally sustaining curriculum, indigenous models of education, and critical pedagogy. F.

T&L 579. Inquiry into Professional Practice. 3 Credits.

Students in TL 579 will explore theoretical constructs such as Living Theory, Self-Study, and Critical Theory to understand the role of professional and practitioner inquiry in researching and improving their own practice. Students will plan and conduct an in-depth inquiry project culminating in a case study within their professional setting. Prerequisites: TL graduate status. S.

T&L 580. Practicum in Schools. 1-4 Credits.

Practicum in study of desirable school practices, observations in nearby schools, and application of research findings in solving practical problems. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational and major area courses, and consent of the instructor and advisor. Repeatable.

T&L 581. Resident Internship. 3 Credits.

A full-time, year-long internship experience conducted in a cooperating school district. Resident teachers are fully responsible for a classroom as well as completing their graduate studies for a master's degree. Prerequisites: Participation in the summer program prior to the internship and teaching licensure (see dept for approval). F.

T&L 582. Resident Internship. 3 Credits.

A full-time, year-long internship experience conducted in a cooperating school district. Resident teachers are fully responsible for a classroom as well as completing their graduate studies for a master's degree. Prerequisites: Participation in the summer program prior to the internship and teaching licensure (see dept for approval). S.

T&L 583. Reading Clinic. 2 Credits.

Supervised clinic practicum in diagnosis of reading difficulties, report writing, and instruction. Includes school consultations. Corequisite: T&L 534.

T&L 584. Internship in Education. 1-8 Credits.

This is a culminating experience primarily for Sixth year and Doctoral students. The internships will be identified in one of the following sub-areas: (A) Educational Administration, (B) Special Education, (C) Curriculum, (D) Educational Research, or (E) Teacher Education. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational, cognate, and major area coursework and consent of advisor and instructor. Repeatable.

T&L 586. Research in Teacher Development and Professionalization Policies. 3 Credits.

Graduate students will explore research on many of the policy issues that surround teachers and shape their work lives. The nation's public schools and nature of teachers' work are directly affected by broader economic, political, and social forces and transformations. Explorations will include how these factors come together, how they have been studied in previous scholarship, and the implications for teachers. Through course readings, seminar style discussions, and independent work, students will gain an understanding of the complex nature of teacher development, professionalization policies, and develop a line of research inquiry in this area. F,S.

T&L 587. Educational Research Apprenticeship (ERA). 1-3 Credits.

Educational Research Apprenticeship (ERA) provides doctoral graduate the opportunity for faculty mentorship on educational research. The student focuses on a topic of research, receives mentoring from faculty, develops their research skills, and gains a greater understanding of research in education. Repeatable to 7.00 credits. F,S,SS.

T&L 589. Professional Development: Resident Teacher Program. 1 Credit.

This field-based experience provides mentoring and coaching, translates baccalaureate theory and research into practice, and requires active participation in the school placement and classroom setting. Issues and topics relevant to first year teachers and graduate education are emphasized through field work and discussions. Prerequisite: Admission into the Elementary Education Resident Teacher Program. SS.

T&L 590. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of education not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor. Repeatable.

T&L 591. Readings in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor. Repeatable.

T&L 593. Independent Projects. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

T&L 596. Individual Research in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor. Repeatable.

T&L 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

The scholarly project demonstrates critical analysis and application of information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. The project allows students to demonstrate scholarly skills in an integrated manner that is directly related to their roles as teachers, program evaluators, and action researchers. The scholarly project must be approved by the student's adviser.

T&L 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

T&L 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

T&L 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable to 9.00 credits.

T&L 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable to 15.00 credits.

Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

T&L 322. Administration and Leadership in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

An investigation of patterns of administration, curriculum organization, spatial resources, and staffing in early childhood settings, serving children 0-8 years old. Topics include federal and state laws and emerging trends in preschool and primary education in the state, region, and nation. Ten (10) hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education program. F.

T&L 422. Development of the Gifted and Talented. 2 Credits.

Research and theory for understanding the development needs of the more able child in early childhood and in educational experiences. S.

T&L 423. Assessment and Individualized Planning in Special Education. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles and practices of: (1) obtaining diagnostic information on school-related problems of a student; (2) assimilating this information and prescribing appropriate alterations based on continuous measurement data. Prerequisites or Corequisites: T&L 251 and T&L 319. F,S.

T&L 493. Workshop. 1-4 Credits.

Special problems in Special Education; consideration of special problems of concern to the Special Education teacher and other educators. Repeatable to 8.00 credits. F,S.