Biomedical Science (BIMD)

Courses

BIMD 202. Introduction to Medical Microbiology Lecture. 3 Credits.

An introductory medical microbiology course that provides a background in all aspects of microbial agents and disease including cell biology, impact on human health, and public health approaches to microbial disease. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 116 or CHEM 121 with a grade of C or higher. F,S,SS.

BIMD 202L. Introduction to Medical Microbiology Laboratory. 2 Credits.

An introductory laboratory course in the isolation and identification of all types of microorganisms with an emphasis on those that cause disease. Four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 116 or 121 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite: BIMD 202. F,S,SS.

BIMD 220. Human Anatomy & Physiology I. 3 Credits.

BIMD 220 (3 credits) and BIMD 221 (3 credits) together are a complete survey of the anatomy and physiology of the major human organ systems and the foundational concepts required to understand them. BIMD 220 covers beginner material on introductory A&P, cells, and tissues, as well as advancing through the skin, skeletal, muscle and nervous organ systems. BIMD 221 is a more advanced study of the endocrine, lymphatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Each concept is presented through the lens of a diverse human population and both BIMD 220 and 221 are validated as essential studies special emphasis courses covering "The Diversity of Human Experience" topic. Together the courses are designed to meet field standards using the HAPS learning outcomes and goals. Corequisite: Either BIOL 150 and BIOL 150L or CHEM 116 and CHEM 116L or CHEM 121 and CHEM 121L. F,S.

BIMD 220L. Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory exploration of human anatomy and physiology through virtual physiology experiments, dissections, human cadaver viewings, and evaluations of self. Accompanies BIMD 220. Corequisite: BIMD 220. F.

BIMD 221. Human Anatomy & Physiology II. 3 Credits.

BIMD 220 (3 credits) and BIMD 221 (3 credits) together are a complete survey of the anatomy and physiology of the major human organ systems and the foundational concepts required to understand them. BIMD 220 covers beginner material on introductory A&P, cells, and tissues, as well as advancing through the skin, skeletal, muscle and nervous organ systems. BIMD 221 is a more advanced study of the endocrine, lymphatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Each concept is presented through the lens of a diverse human population and both BIMD 220 and 221 are validated as essential studies special emphasis courses covering "The Diversity of Human Experience" topic. Together the courses are designed to meet field standards using the HAPS learning outcomes and goals. Prerequisite: BIMD 220. F,S.

BIMD 221L. Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory exploration of human anatomy and physiology through virtual physiology experiments, dissections, human cadaver viewings, and evaluations of self. Accompanies BIMD 221. Corequisite: BIMD 221.

BIMD 301. Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Introductory exploration of major concepts in biochemistry. The four main knowledge themes are macromolecular structure and function, energy transformation, metabolic regulation and integration, and information flow. Students will practice skills in molecular visualization, critical thinking, and working in small groups. Prerequisite: CHEM 340 or CHEM 341 with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 342 are recommended. S.

BIMD 302. General Microbiology Lecture. 2 Credits.

An introduction to general microbiology with emphasis on the morphology, classification, and physiology of bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The significance of microorganisms in consumer product production, waste disposal, the environment, and interaction with humans is discussed. Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 116 or CHEM 121, with a grade of C or better in both prerequisite courses. S.

BIMD 302L. General Microbiology Laboratory. 2 Credits.

An introductory laboratory course in the growth, isolation, and identification of microorganisms from a variety of sources using procedures such as staining, microscopy, culturing, and biochemical tests. Scientific inquiry is promoted through authentic problems faced in microbial fields. Four hours laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIMD 302. S.

BIMD 328. Introduction to Immunology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fundamentals of immunology including innate immunity, humoral and cellular response, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, immunogenetics, tolerance, and immunodiagnostics. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and BIOL 315 or BIMD 301 with a grade of C or better. F.

BIMD 401. Advanced Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Serves as a bridge to career paths that would benefit from a deeper grounding in the molecular and cellular life sciences. Students will apply core concepts in biochemistry as they explore primary literature in biochemistry and molecular biology. Students will practice skills working in small groups, including critical reading of peer-reviewed research, interpretation of biochemical and molecular biological data, and using diverse databases and other online tools. Prerequisite: BIMD 301 with a grade of C or better. F.

BIMD 492. Peer Teaching and Tutoring in Biomedical Sciences. 1-4 Credits.

A course designed to provide individual students with the opportunity to peer teach and/or tutor for classes in the department of Biomedical Sciences. This experience will occur under the direction of a departmental faculty member. Experiences will have variation dependent on the class the student is assisting with. Open to all students with consent of the faculty member. Repeatable to 12.00 credits. S/U grading. F,S,SS.

BIMD 494. Directed Studies. 1-4 Credits.

A course designed to provide individual students with the opportunity for creative, scholarly and research activities in Biomedical Sciences under the direction of a departmental faculty member. Repeatable to 12.00 credits.

BIMD 501. Scientific Discovery I. 6 Credits.

A problem based course in which students will address a set of biomedical research scenarios that have been designed so that students will acquire skills in critical thinking, finding, interpreting, and analyzing scientific literature, developing hypothesis-driven questions, proposing and designing experiments, and communicating scientific outcomes orally and in written format. F.

BIMD 502. Scientific Discovery II. 6 Credits.

A problem based course in which students will address a set of biomedical research scenarios that have been designed so that students will advance their skills in critical thinking, finding, interpreting, and analyzing scientific literature, developing hypothesis-driven questions, proposing and designing experiments, and communicating scientific outcomes orally and in written format. This course is a continuation and advancement of BIMD 501. Prerequisite: BIMD 501. S.

BIMD 510. Basic Biomedical Statistics. 2 Credits.

A series of lectures, demonstrations and exercises to provide students with the basic rationales for the use of statistics in the assessment of biomedical data and a selected set of the most common and useful statistical tests. Prerequisite: BIMD 500 or permission of course director. S.

BIMD 513. Seminars in Biomedical Science. 1 Credit.

A series of presentations on original research conducted by UND faculty members as well as extramural leaders in academic and industrial research in the biomedical sciences. Students will participate through assigned reading and writing exercises related to the presentations.

BIMD 514. Foundations of Bioinformatics. 3 Credits.

In this course, students will learn fundamental concepts and methods in bioinformatics, a field at the intersection of biology and computing. The course surveys a wide range of topics including bioinformatics web resources, computational sequence analysis, sequence homology searching and motif finding, transcriptome analysis, and network/pathway analysis. Students will also have opportunities to learn about available bioinformatics web-resources (e.g. UCSC Genome Browser, STRING/BioGRID interaction databases, and etc), next-generation sequencing analysis (focusing on RNA-Seq data) as well as relevant data-analysis tools (R and BioConductor, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, DAVID, etc). The course will also familiarize students with the Linux environment and computational tools needed to manipulate and analyze large biological sequencing data sets. Students will need a familiarity with basic biomedical concepts and basic knowledge of computer usage. No programming skills are required. Students should bring their own wifi-enabled laptop to lectures to fully benefit from the hands-on components of each lecture. Prerequisite: Open to graduate and senior undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. F.

BIMD 516. Responsible Conduct of Research. 2 Credits.

A series of lectures and discussion sessions covering topics related to responsible conduct in research. Students will examine a variety of issues including introduction to ethical decision making, the experience of conflict, laboratory practices, data management, reporting of research, conflict of interest, and compliance. Examples and case studies will be drawn primarily from the biomedical sciences. F.

BIMD 517. Principles of Histology. 3 Credits.

Principles of Histology is a laboratory and discussion based course that builds on prior experience in cell biology and involves a strong self-study component through the use of virtual slides as well as lecture and laboratory orientation videos. By the end of the course the student will have demonstrated a significant knowledge base of tissue microanatomy sufficient for understanding and applying the principles to a wide range of research projects. The student will also have gained sufficient knowledge of histology to be capable of teaching this material to medical, professional, graduate, and undergraduate students. Prerequisite: PATH 500 or permission of instructor. S.

BIMD 518. Grant Writing. 2 Credits.

This is an advanced graduate grant writing and oral presentation course. The objectives of this course are to challenge students: (1) to critically evaluate their own research in an effort to clearly define the significance and innovation of their project, (2) to begin to develop novel ideas based on their research efforts that have the potential to significantly impact their field of study, and (3) to prepare students to present these ideas orally and in writing in a manner that is both logical and convincing. Prerequisite: BIMD 501 and BIMD 502, or consent of instructor. F.

BIMD 520. Principles of Neuroanatomy. 2 Credits.

In this course students will learn the fundamental principles of neuroscience, particularly gross and cellular anatomy, development and systems physiology of the nervous system. Behavioral, cognitive and clinical manifestations of abnormal neural functions will also be addressed. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or permission of instructor. F.

BIMD 521. Neurophysiology. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the electrical properties of neuronal membranes. The course is organized to first provide a brief review of the basic properties of semi-permeable membranes. The electrical and biochemistry principles that apply to neuronal membranes are discussed. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. F.

BIMD 522. Principles of Neuropharmacology. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the latest developments in molecular neuropharmacology. The course directive is to provide an up-to-date foundation for clinical neuroscience by emphasizing a comprehensive molecular and cellular approach to the effects of drugs on the nervous system. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 523. Neurochemical Basis of the Nervous System. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental concepts of brain metabolism and neurochemical signaling. It emphasizes recent advances in understanding brain biochemical processes and molecular mechanisms occurring in health and disease. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 524. Neurodegenerative Diseases and Pathophysiology. 2 Credits.

This course exposes students to diverse neurodegenerative diseases and nervous system pathophysiology. The emphasis is on mechanistic understanding of the most recent advances in the field. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 525. Readings in Neuroscience. 1-4 Credits.

A supervised readings course on topics of mutual interest to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. Repeatable to 4.00 credits. On demand.

BIMD 526. Medical Experiences for Graduate Students. 1 Credit.

The goal of this course is to introduce the graduate student to a "disease-specific" clinical experience so that the student can acquire a better understanding of the importance of translational medicine, develop a firm appreciation of a patient's and a physician's understanding of disease and its treatment, and to introduce the student to the overall culture of clinical research. Prerequisite: Successful completion of comprehensive exam and permission of academic advisor and Instructor of Record; student should initiate discussion with the Instructor of Record at least one month prior to the start of enrollment. S/U grading. On demand.

BIMD 527. Advanced Studies in Biological Safety. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide fundamental concepts and methods in biological safety to typical biomedical, public health, and biology graduate students who do not have advanced training in microbiology, epidemiology, and environmental health sciences. Additionally, this course will fulfill some of the registration requirements for Registered Biosafety Professional (RBP) and Certified Biosafety Professional (CBSP) credential for individuals looking for careers in the field of biological safety. This course is open to graduate students and to senior undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BIMD 530. Components of the Immune System. 2 Credits.

Have you ever wondered why you don't get sick every time you breathe air which can carry as many as 2000 different kinds of microbes on any given day? Or what keeps your defense system from attacking your own cells but can get rid of most invaders without you even noticing? This is the amazing task of your fascinating immune system! This course will provide an overview of cellular and molecular components of mammalian immune system and their function. The students will learn how these components are derived and how they interact and communicate with each other to coordinate a response to pathological insults in order to protect the human body. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. F.

BIMD 531. Components of Microbial Pathogenesis. 2 Credits.

The objective of the course is to provide students with a background in the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Students will learn basic principles of host-parasite interactions. Paradigms of host-parasite interactions will be illustrated by studying, at the molecular and cellular levels, specific infectious diseases and the agents that cause them. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. F.

BIMD 532. Microbial Gene Regulation. 1 Credit.

This course will provide an understanding of genetic regulation in bacteria. Classic pathways will be examined as paradigms of regulatory circuits. These examples will be expanded to learn how bacteria exploit host cells as well as the use of bacterial regulatory circuits in modern molecular biology. S.

BIMD 533. Microbial Membranes and Transport. 1 Credit.

This course will explore bacterial membranes with particular emphasis on generation of energy and transport of molecules across the membranes. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 534. Microbial Cell Structure and Function. 1 Credit.

Microbial cells have unique structures that relate their functions. Students completing this course will have an understanding of how prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms differ and how different structures can be used to obtain similar functions. They will understand how microbial structures influence interactions between microbes and between microbes and eukaryotic organisms. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 535. Bacterial Host: Pathogen Interactions. 1 Credit.

The objective of the course is to provide students with a background in the fundamental aspects that occur at the bacterial: host interface. Students will learn the interplay between bacterial virulence factors, strategies used to evade host defenses, and host responses to infection. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 536. Molecular Biology and Pathogenesis of Viruses. 1 Credit.

This course will cover the structure, replication, and pathogenesis of human RNA and DNA viruses, the host immune response to viral infection and the strategies employed by viruses to escape immune detection and elimination. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 537. Host-Pathogen Interactions involving Eukaryotic Microbes (Parasites/Fungi). 1 Credit.

Eukaryotic microbe infections have a devastating impact on global health and economic development as they infect over one third of the world's population and cause acute and chronic pathologies. Furthermore, macroscopic parasites (helminths/ worms) are master regulators of host inflammatory response and hence reduce the immune response to coinfections and negatively affect the success of vaccination programs against many other pathogens. In contrast, it has been proposed that the rise in autoimmune diseases in the developed world could be a direct result of the successful complete elimination of parasitic helminths in these communities. Thus, the purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of the clinically important eukaryotic microbe pathogens and the immune response associated with their infections. A series of lectures will cover course components; a) basic introduction to protozoa, helminth, and fungi, and b) basic knowledge of the immune response and its involvement in parasitic/ fungal infections. An effort has been made to increase clinical relevance and problem-solving skills through a team-learning exercise involving quiz and paper presentations. S.

BIMD 538. Immunological Disorders. 1 Credit.

This course will include discussion of cellular and molecular immunopathologies leading to autoimmune diseases, and primary and secondary immunodeficiencies; and the role of the immune system in tumorigeneses and transplantation, as well as various methods of modification of the immune response. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. S.

BIMD 539. Readings in Microbiology and Immunology. 1-4 Credits.

A supervised readings course on topics of mutual interest to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. Repeatable to 4.00 credits. On demand.

BIMD 590. Research. 1-12 Credits.

The course allows research in pertinent problems in various aspects of biomedical sciences. Repeatable. F,S,SS.

BIMD 591. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Sciences. 1-3 Credits.

A series of lectures, discussions and/or laboratory experiences developed around a specific topic in the biomedical sciences. Repeatable as topics vary. Prerequisite: BIMD 502 or consent of instructor. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. On demand.

BIMD 597. Biomedical Sciences Internships. 1 Credit.

The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to industry and governmental research experiences relevant to their graduate studies and career plans. The goal is to provide the student with the opportunity to expand upon their research training, develop a firm appreciation of the industry and governmental expectations, and be introduced to the overall culture of industry and governmental research. Prerequisite: Acceptance into internship program, permission from advisor, two months' notice before enrolling, good standing within the program, and completion of the comprehensive exam; international students can enroll after first year of study. F,S,SS.

BIMD 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-6 Credits.

This is a continuation course to allow graduate students, who have reached 90 credit hours, the ability to enroll so that they can continue working on research projects needed to complete their dissertation or thesis projects. Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Advisor and Graduate Program Director. Repeatable to 40.00 credits. F,S,SS.

BIMD 998. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Completion of thesis required for M.S. Repeatable to 6.00 credits. F,S,SS.

BIMD 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Completion of dissertation required for Ph.D. Repeatable to 12.00 credits. F,S,SS.