2014-2015 Catalog

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

http://engineering.und.edu/mechanical/

Ames, Bandyopadhyay, Bibel, Cavalli (Chair), Grewal, Gupta, Johnson, McNally, Neubert, Semke, Stanlake, Tang and Zahui

The Mechanical Engineering Department prepares students at all levels to effectively apply modern engineering principles to the evolving needs of industry and society through focused efforts in manufacturing, materials science, mechanical design, thermal sciences, and aerospace applications.  The Department supports an accessible, collaborative, multidisciplinary research and learning environment that stimulates students and faculty members to reach their highest potential through hands-on education, leadership opportunities, and life-long learning.

The Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of North Dakota is committed to graduating mechanical engineers who, 3-5 years after graduation:

  1. Apply mechanical engineering principles in the areas of mechanical design, thermal systems, or manufacturing and materials in the public or private sectors;
  2. Practice mechanical engineering across a broad range of job functions or pursue advanced degrees;
  3. Complete engineering projects alone or as part of a team, exhibiting the appropriate teamwork, leadership and communication skills;
  4. Understand the broader implications of their engineering efforts on local, national and global society and apply the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct;
  5. Maintain relevant knowledge of contemporary engineering and professional issues and an understanding of modern engineering tools through regular participation in professional development activities.

Continuous assessment of student learning in accordance with specific program outcomes, including input from program constituents such as students, alumni, employers and industry advisory groups, provides opportunity to measure success in meeting the mission of the department. Beginning with the freshman year, teamwork, problem solving, and design exercises are interwoven throughout the curriculum, culminating in a two-semester capstone design project during the senior year. Several courses include laboratories which develop experimental, teamwork, and communication skills. Technical papers required by selected courses develop knowledge of contemporary issues as well as communication skills. State-of-the-art computer software is used extensively throughout the curriculum. Within our bachelor’s degree we offer an Aerospace Concentration. This option adds five credits to the degree but results in the student earning a private pilot’s license as well as tailoring the engineering degree towards the aerospace industry. Three other concentrations are also available: Mechanical Design; Thermal Sciences; and Materials and Manufacturing. Students are strongly encouraged to prepare for a professional license by taking the national fundamentals of engineering (FE) exam prior to graduation. Students who excel academically are also well-qualified to pursue graduate work in mechanical engineering or a related field.

The department offers combined Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME)/Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) and BSME/Master of Engineering (MEngr) degrees. For more detailed information, see Mechanical Engineering in the Graduate Section and Combined Degree Program under the College of Engineering and Mines section.

The Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

In addition to the normal transfer credit requirements, students in Mechanical Engineering must complete a minimum of 21 credit hours of 300-level or higher coursework in Mechanical Engineering at UND, including:

ME 418Manufacturing Processes4
ME 483Mechanical Measurements Laboratory3
ME 487
  & ME 488
Engineering Design
   and Engineering Design
5

 


College of Engineering and Mines

 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Required 129 credits (36 of which must be numbered 300 or above, and 60 of which must be from a 4-year institution) including:

I. Essential Studies Requirements (see University ES listing).

II. The Following Curriculum:

Freshman Year
First SemesterCredits
CHEM 121General Chemistry I 13
CHEM 121LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory 11
ENGL 110College Composition I 13
ME 101Introduction to Mechanical Engineering 1,23
MATH 165Calculus I 14
Arts and Humanities  3
Second Semester
ENGR 200Computer Applications in Engineering 1,22
ENGL 130Composition II: Writing for Public Audiences 3
MATH 166Calculus II 14
PHYS 251University Physics I 14
PHYS 251L 1 0
Arts and Humanities  3
Sophomore Year
First Semester
ENGR 201Statics 13
ME 201Student Design 22
ME 341Thermodynamics 13
MATH 265Calculus III 14
PHYS 252University Physics II 14
PHYS 252L 1 0
Second Semester
ENGR 202Dynamics 13
ENGR 203Mechanics of Materials 13
EE 206Circuit Analysis 3
MATH 266Elementary Differential Equations 3
PHYS 253
   or CHEM 122
University Physics III 3
   or General Chemistry II
4
PHYS 253L
   or CHEM 122L 3
 
   or General Chemistry II Laboratory
0-1
Junior Year
First Semester
ME 301Materials Science 3
ME 306Fluid Mechanics 3
ME 322Design of Machinery 3
ENGR 460Engineering Economy 3
Technical Elective 4 3
Second Semester
ME 323Machine Component Design 3
ME 323LMachine Component Design Laboratory 1
ME 418Manufacturing Processes 4
ME 474Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer 3
MATH 321Applied Statistical Methods 3
Technical Elective 4 3
Senior Year
First Semester
ME 480Mechanical Engineering Seminar 3
ME 483Mechanical Measurements Laboratory 3
ME 487Engineering Design 2
Social Science  3
Technical Electives 4 6
Second Semester
ME 488Engineering Design 3
ME 370
   or CHE 340
   or PHIL 250
Engineering Disasters and Ethics 2
   or Professional Integrity in Engineering
   or Ethics in Engineering and Science
3
Arts & Humanities (if taking either ME 370 or ChE 340) or Social Science (if taking Phil 250)  3
Technical Elective 4 6
 Total Credits: 129-130

Technical Electives and Optional Concentrations

One technical elective must be taken from each stem unless the student is pursuing the Aerospace Concentration (see below). Students may receive an optional concentration, documented on the transcript, in one of the listed stems as indicated. Students who satisfactorily complete two ME 397 Cooperative Education experiences for a combined total of at least three credit hours are granted a waiver for one technical elective, provided one of the Cooperative Education experiences lasts for the duration of either a fall or spring semester. The waived technical elective is considered as elective at large and is not specified into any one of the three stems listed below.

I. Mechanical Design Stem

ME 424Systems Dynamics and Control (#)3
ME 426Mechanical VIbrations (#)3
ME 429Introduction to Finite Element Analysis (#)3
ME 439Introduction to Robotics3
ME 484Ground Vehicle Dynamics3
ME 489Senior Honors Thesis3
ME 523Advanced Machine Design (#)3
ME 525Metal Fatigue in Engineering (#)3
ME 526Advanced Vibrations (#)3
ME 529Advanced Finite Element Methods (#)3
ME 532Advanced Dynamics (#)3

Mechanical Design Concentration - 129 hours

Requires ME 323 Machine Component Design/ME 323L Machine Component Design Laboratory and any four of the Mechanical Design Stem technical electives.

II. Thermal Sciences Stem

ME 342Intermediate Thermodynamics (#)3
ME 446Gas Turbines (#)3
ME 449Internal Combustion Engines (#)3
ME 451Heating and Air Conditioning3
ME 464Computational Fluid Dynamics (#)3
ME 476Intermediate Fluid Mechanics (#)3
ME 477Compressible Fluid Flow (#)3
ME 489Senior Honors Thesis3
ME 542Thermodynamics of Materials3
ME 545Fluidized-Bed Combustion Engineering3
ME 574Advanced Heat Transfer (#)3
ME 575Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer (#)3
ME 576Convective Heat Transfer (#)3

Thermal Sciences Concentration - 129 hours

Requires ME 306 Fluid Mechanics, ME 341 Thermodynamics and any four of the Thermal Sciences Stem technical electives.

III. Manufacturing and Materials Stem

ME 313Material Properties and Selection3
ME 420Composite Materials (#)3
ME 428Advanced Manufacturing Processes3
ME 439Introduction to Robotics3
ME 524Deformation and Fracture (#)3
ME 525Metal Fatigue in Engineering (#)3
ME 542Thermodynamics of Materials3

Manufacturing and Materials Concentration - 129 hours

Requires ME 418 Manufacturing Processes and any four of the Manufacturing and Materials Stem technical electives.

IV. Aerospace Concentration - 134 hours

Requires students to complete AVIT 102 Introduction to Aviation (5 credits) plus six technical electives. AVIT 102 Introduction to Aviation includes earning a private pilot license and is recommended for the summer session between the freshman and sophomore years. 5

Technical electives must be chosen from the aerospace group of electives as identified by # in the above technical elective listing. One of the technical electives must be either ME 429 Introduction to Finite Element Analysis or ME 464 Computational Fluid Dynamics. ME 490 Special Laboratory Problems or an ME 590 Special Topics may also be included in the aerospace group at the discretion of the Mechanical Engineering Chair.

1

Students must achieve a grade of “C” or better.

2

ME 101 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering, ME 201 Student Design, ENGR 200 Computer Applications in Engineering and ME 397 Cooperative Education may be waived by successful completion of ME 102 Professional Assessment and Evaluation. The ethics requirement as represented by ME 370 Engineering Disasters and Ethics/CHE 340 Professional Integrity in Engineering/PHIL 250 Ethics in Engineering and Science may also be waived, but not the University’s Essential Studies Requirements.

3

Another lab science may be substituted for PHYS 253 University Physics III or CHEM 122 General Chemistry II, consistent with the student’s individual learning plan, by petition to the ME Department.

4

One technical elective can be taken outside the ME Department within other SEM Departments, Math or Physics. The course must be at the 300-level or higher and be consistent with the student’s individual learning plan.

5

Students already holding a private pilot license may earn a commercial license or an acceptable advanced rating through UND as a substitute for AVIT 102 Introduction to Aviation.

Courses

ME 101. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering. 3 Credits.

Development of visualization, technical communication, and documentation skills. 3-D geometric modeling as applied to CADD applications using current methods and techniques commonly found in industry. Introduction to engineering design and analysis of a machine or system, and team problem solving. Development of an academic career plan. Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering major. F,S.

ME 102. Professional Assessment and Evaluation. 1 Credit.

This course is designed for students with industrial experience. Students complete a portfolio documenting educational and work experiences for evaluation, and individualized curriculum plans are developed. Various academic programs in engineering are also introduced. Based on the assessment and evaluation, some engineering requirements may be waived. S/U grading only. Prerequisites: Work experience and/or technician school training plus completion of CHEM 121, CHEM 121L, PHYS 251, PHYS 252, MATH 165, MATH 166, and MATH 265. F,S,SS.

ME 201. Student Design. 2 Credits.

Team problem solving with design and build of a machine or mechanism, typically ASME Design Contest project. Machine shop safety and introduction to fabrication processes. Special topic lectures on contemporary Mechanical Engineering issues and research activities. Prerequisite: ME 101 or ENGR 101. Corequisites: PHYS 251 or ENGR 201. F.

ME 290. Laboratory Problems. 1-3 Credits.

Laboratory investigations of interest to student and faculty. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Consent of instructor is the prerequisite On demand.

ME 301. Materials Science. 3 Credits.

The theory of the structure of matter, the prediction and evaluation of engineering properties of materials. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 with a grade of C or better, PHYS 252 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 306. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Fluid properties; fluid statics and dynamics; transport theory and transport analogies, conservation of mass, energy, and momentum; dimensional analysis; boundary layer concepts; pipe flows; compressible flow; open channel flow. Prerequisites: PHYS 251 and MATH 265, both with a grade of C or better. F,S.

ME 313. Material Properties and Selection. 3 Credits.

Study of relationships between materials, manufacture and design of engineering component. Prerequisite: ME 301 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 322. Design of Machinery. 3 Credits.

Analytical study of motions, velocities, accelerations and forces for design of machine elements. Introduction to spatial mechanisms, robotics, and actuator selection. Prerequisites: ENGR 200 with a grade of C or better, ENGR 202 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 323. Machine Component Design. 3 Credits.

Design of machine elements such as shafts, bearings, gears, clutches, springs, threaded components, and bolted, riveted, welded, and bonded joints. Stress and failure theory analyses of the implementation of machine components are covered. Prerequisites: ENGR 203 with a grade of C or better, ME 322 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. S.

ME 323L. Machine Component Design Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Application of design and analysis tools developed in the Machine Component Design course. Laboratory emphasizes creative design, analysis techniques, construction methods, and design report writing. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. Corequisite: ME 323. S.

ME 341. Thermodynamics. 3 Credits.

Fundamental energy relationships applied to both closed and open systems. Determination of thermodynamic properties, first and second laws of thermodynamic processes and basic cycles. Prerequisites: PHYS 251 and MATH 166, both with a grade of C or better. F,S.

ME 342. Intermediate Thermodynamics. 3 Credits.

Power and refrigeration cycles. Exergy analysis, psychrometrics, reacting and non-reacting mixtures. Prerequisite: ME 341 with a grade of C or better and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 370. Engineering Disasters and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Engineering disasters will be the basis for teaching an ethics course to engineering students. Starting with the premise that most people know the difference between right and wrong (this is not a course on criminal activity!), the course explores how engineers, in spite of their best intentions, sometimes create disastrous situations. The effect of cumulative adverse detail is difficult to teach except with case studies. Also explored is cost vs. safety trade-offs, the role of lawsuits, and government regulation. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 397. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

A practical work experience with an employer closely associated with the student's academic area. Arranged by mutual agreement among student, department and employer. Repeatable to 12 credits. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F,S,SS.

ME 418. Manufacturing Processes. 4 Credits.

Descriptive and analytical study of manufacturing methods and economics as they pertain to machining, metrology and automation. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: ENGR 203 with a grade of C or better, ME 301, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 420. Composite Materials. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ME 301 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 424. Systems Dynamics and Control. 3 Credits.

Theory, analysis, and design of linear closed-loop control systems containing electronic, hydraulic, and mechanical components. Differential equations. LaPlace transforms, Nyquist and Bode diagrams are covered. Prerequisites: MATH 266, ME 322, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 426. Mechanical VIbrations. 3 Credits.

Vibration analysis and design as it applies to single and multi degree freedom mechanical systems, isolation and absorption of vibration, vibration of continuous systems, numerical methods of solution. Prerequisites: ENGR 202 with a grade of C or better, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. S.

ME 428. Advanced Manufacturing Processes. 3 Credits.

Individual projects involving the manufacturing economics and flow charts for selected products and basic technical principles of manufacturing processes. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: ME 418 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 429. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. 3 Credits.

Finite element analysis is introduced as a design tool. Emphasis is given to modeling techniques and element types. Matrix methods are used throughout the class. Prerequisites: ENGR 203 with a grade of C and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 439. Introduction to Robotics. 3 Credits.

A systems engineering approach to robotics. Presents an introduction to manipulators, sensors, actuators, and end effectors for automation. Topics covered include kinematics, dynamics, control, programming of manipulators, pattern recognition, and computer vision. Prerequisites: ENGR 200 with a grade of C or better, MATH 166 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 446. Gas Turbines. 3 Credits.

General principles, thermodynamics, and performance of gas turbine engines. Design consideration of engine components. Prerequisites: ME 341 with a grade of C or better and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 449. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of spark ignition and compression ignition engines, related components and processes. Prerequisites: ME 342 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 451. Heating and Air Conditioning. 3 Credits.

Psychometrics, heating and cooling loads and analysis of air conditioning systems. Prerequisites: ME 342 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ME 474. On demand.

ME 464. Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Credits.

Provides a practical experience using computational fluid dynamics and provides supporting material in fluid dynamics, which is useful in understanding the need to resolve grids in boundary layers and other regions of high velocity gradients. The course is structured as half lecture and half laboratory. The lecture covers topics related to laminar and turbulence boundary layers with and without acceleration, turbulence modeling, wakes and jets. The laboratory provides experience in building grids using the program GAMBIT, the solid/fluid modeling and meshing program, and calculating solutions using FLUENT, a commercial flow solver. Prerequisites: ME 306, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 474. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer. 3 Credits.

Convection, conduction, radiation, dimensional analysis and design of heat transfer equipment. Prerequisites: MATH 266, ME 306, ME 341 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. S.

ME 476. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Differential forms of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum for viscous fluid flow. Boundary layer theory and its applications. Principles of one-dimensional compressible flow. Prerequisites: ME 306, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 477. Compressible Fluid Flow. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory and application of one-dimensional compressible flow. Course topics include isentropic flow in converging and converging/diverging nozzles, normal shock waves, oblique shock waves, Prandtl-Meyer flow, flow with friction and heat addition. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. Prerequisites or corequisites: ME 341 with a grade of C or better and ME 306. On demand.

ME 480. Mechanical Engineering Seminar. 3 Credits.

Reports and presentations on current developments in mechanical engineering and engineering ethics. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 483. Mechanical Measurements Laboratory. 3 Credits.

Experiments and written reports on the operation and performance of instruments and basic mechanical engineering equipment. Prerequisites: EE 206 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F.

ME 484. Ground Vehicle Dynamics. 3 Credits.

ME 484 is a junior and senior level elective course. This course deals with the design of ground vehicle suspension and steering systems. Vehicle ride, handling and safety systems are covered along with passive and active suspension control. Prerequisite: ME 322 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program or consent of instructor. On demand.

ME 485. Multiphysics Modeling. 3 Credits.

Theory and techniques of modeling coupled thermal, fluid, mechanical, and/or electrical fields in components design. The focus is on the fundamental techniques used to simultaneously derive and solve coupled equations and the use of commercial multi physics finite element software. Prerequisite: ME 429. S.

ME 487. Engineering Design. 2 Credits.

The first course of a two-course sequence in Engineering Design, students will establish important features of the machine or system to be designed, perform market analysis, establish design objectives, explore alternatives, conduct research, specify constraints. Prerequisites: ME 323, ME 323L ME 474 or any one elective from the thermal science group, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. Corequisite: ME 483. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGR 460. F.

ME 488. Engineering Design. 3 Credits.

Systematic study and practice essential to the optimal design of a complete machine or system, utilizing economic and social constraints together with current mechanical and thermal design techniques. The course is a continuation of ME 487 taken the preceding semester. Prerequisites: ME 487 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. S.

ME 489. Senior Honors Thesis. 1-8 Credits.

Supervised independent study culminating in a thesis. Repeatable to 9 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department, approval of the Honors Committee, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. F,S.

ME 490. Special Laboratory Problems. 1-3 Credits.

Laboratory investigations of interest to students and faculty. Repeatable to maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382