Biology

Courses

BIOL 503. Seminar. 1 Credit.

Discussion of selected topics in advanced biology, a different topic each semester. Repeatable to 6 credits.

BIOL 505A. Biological Inquiry for Teachers. 3 Credits.

First of general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include energy conversion, cell and molecular biology, genetics, physiology, evolution, ecology, and pedagogical issues. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 505L. On demand.

BIOL 505B. Biological Inquiry for Teachers. 3 Credits.

First of general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include energy conversion, cell and molecular biology, genetics, physiology, evolution, ecology, and pedagogical issues. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 505A.

BIOL 505L. Biological Inquiry for Teachers Laboratory. 2 Credits.

This hands-on lab course complements Biol 505 and is intended for teachers planning to enrich their practical skills in biology for professional development. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: Must be licensed k-12 teacher.

BIOL 506A. Ecology for Teachers. 3 Credits.

Second of a general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include physiological ecology, behavioral ecology, population ecology, community ecology, landscape ecology, geographical ecology, global ecology and pedagogical issues. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 506L.

BIOL 506B. Ecology for Teachers. 3 Credits.

Second of a general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include physiological ecology, behavioral ecology, population ecology, community ecology, landscape ecology, geographical ecology, global ecology and pedagogical issues. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 506A.

BIOL 506L. Ecology for Teachers Laboratory. 2 Credits.

This hands-on lab course complements Biol 506 and is intended for teachers planning to enrich their practical skills in biology for professional development. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisites: BIOL 505L and BIOL 505B.

BIOL 507A. Cellular and Molecular Biology for Teachers. 3 Credits.

Third of a general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include cell, molecular, developmental and evolutionary biology. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 507L.

BIOL 507B. Cellular and Molecular Biology for Teachers. 3 Credits.

Third of a general biology course sequence intended for teachers planning to qualify to teach high school biology, or teachers looking to enrich their content knowledge in biology for professional development. Topics will include cell, molecular, developmental and evolutionary biology. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 507A.

BIOL 507L. Cellular and Molecular Biology for Teachers Laboratory. 2 Credits.

This hand-on lab course complements Biol 507 and is intended for teachers planning to enrich their practical skills in biology for professional development. May not be used in Ph.D. or Master's programs. Prerequisite: Must be licensed K-12 teacher.

BIOL 509. Scientific Writing. 2 Credits.

Writing is an essential part of the scientific enterprise. In this course, students will develop their scientific writing skill through readings and discussion on the nature of effective writing, and through critique of writing projects produced by each student. Course can be repeated up to 4 credits for different writing projects. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable to 4 credits. F.

BIOL 512. Advanced Evolutionary Analysis. 2 Credits.

This course wil focus on methods that reconstruct evolutionary histories of populations, species and higher-level taxa. The course will also discuss the evolution of specialized traits using appropriate analyses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. On demand.

BIOL 533. Grassland Ecology. 2 Credits.

Phytogeography, environmental influences, and community dynamics of grassland ecosystems with emphasis on herbage production, ecosystem modeling, and ecological characteristics of major grass species. Prerequisite: BIOL 332 or an equivalent approved by the department.

BIOL 534. Quantitative Ecology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the methods employed in the study of the ecology of natural populations/communities of plants and animals.

BIOL 535. Physiological Ecology. 3 Credits.

Critical evaluation and synthesis of selected theoretical topics in physiological ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 442 or consent of instructor. On demand.

BIOL 536. Advanced Population Biology. 3 Credits.

In this course we will examine current thinking on a range of topics in population ecology, population genetics and the links between ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Students will build on background reading by developing their own models of some aspect of population biology (ecological and/or genetic). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. S, even years.

BIOL 571. Research Design and Statistical Analysis. 3 Credits.

Topics in scientific inference, research design, and current approaches to statistical analysis of data in biology and other studies of the natural world. Practical data analysis using commonly available software. Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics. F.

BIOL 572. Design of Biological Experiments. 1 Credit.

Topics in designing biological experiments including the role of experimentation, inference, sampling, replication, controls, and power analysis. Corequisite: BIOL 470 or consent of instructor. F.

BIOL 590. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Important and current topics in biology not covered by other courses. Repeatable when topics vary. Examples include: Aquaculture, Big Game Biology, Biorhythms, Conservation Biology, Fire Ecology, Molecular Techniques, Plant-Animal Interactions, Sex Determination and Speciation. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable.

BIOL 592. Directed Studies. 1-4 Credits.

Designed to meet the needs of individual and small groups of students in areas of faculty specialization. May be repeated to a total of 12 credits. Repeatable to 12 credits.

BIOL 593. Advanced Topics in Plant Biology. 1-4 Credits.

Advanced topics in plant biology. Examples include: Plant Development, Plant Biochemistry, and Plant Genetics. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable. On demand.

BIOL 594. Advanced Topics in Genetics. 1-4 Credits.

Advanced topics in genetics. Examples include: Biochemical Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Human Medical and Population Genetics. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable. On demand.

BIOL 595. Advanced Topics in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation. 1-4 Credits.

Advanced topics in fisheries, wildlife or conservation biology. Examples include: Natural Resource Policy, Waterfowl Biology and Management, and Wetland and Prairie Ecology. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable. On demand.

BIOL 596. Advanced Topics in Parasitology. 1-4 Credits.

Advanced topics in parasitology. Examples include: Arthropod Borne Diseases, Helminthology, Disease Biology, and Medically Important Arthropods. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable. On demand.

BIOL 597. Advanced Topics in Physiology and Development. 1-4 Credits.

Advanced topics in physiology and development. Examples include: Comparative Endocrinology, Vascular Development, Embrionic Physiology, and Neural Physiology. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate status or upper division status with consent of instructor. Repeatable. On demand.

BIOL 599. Research. 1-15 Credits.

Intended for students conducting original research in consultation with staff. Repeatable. S/U grading.

BIOL 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

BIOL 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

BIOL 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable to 9 credits.

BIOL 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable to 15 credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

BIOL 312. Evolution. 3 Credits.

A study of the processes that have led from the origin of life to the diverse patterns and forms of life observable today. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. S.

BIOL 315. Genetics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to genetics, with emphasis on classical genetic analysis and the biochemistry of gene transmission, expression and regulation. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. F.

BIOL 332. General Ecology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to ecology. Covers the relationship of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems to their biotic and abiotic environments. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. F.

BIOL 332L. Gen Ecology Lab. 1 Credit.

Field projects and laboratory exercises to complement BIOL 332. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 332. F.

BIOL 333. Population Biology. 3 Credits.

Principles of population genetics, population ecology, and evolution in plants and animals. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L, and MATH 93 or higher. S.

BIOL 336. Systematic Botany. 4 Credits.

Morphology, evolution, and classification of vascular plants with emphasis on the flora of the Great Plains. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or permission of instructor. F, even years.

BIOL 338. Animal Behavior. 2 Credits.

Studies in animal social behavior. The influences of environmental factors on behavior is emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. S, even years.

BIOL 341. Cell Biology. 3 Credits.

Description of processes common to life at the cellular level including: biochemical and structural organization, membrane function, motility, signal transduction, growth, division and genetic regulation of the cell. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 122. S.

BIOL 341L. Cell Biol Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory investigation utilizing techniques to study life at the cellular level including chemical composition and characterization, enzyme kinetics, metabolism and microscopy. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L. Prerequisites or Corequisites: BIOL 341, CHEM 122. S.

BIOL 350. Plant Ecology. 3 Credits.

Structure and function of plants as they relate to the maintenance of plant populations and communities. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or permission of instructor. S, even years.

BIOL 363. Entomology. 4 Credits.

Structure, functions, life history, classification, habits and distribution of insects. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. F, even years.

BIOL 364. Parasitology. 2 Credits.

Classification, structure, functions, and life-cycles of parasites having importance to human, wildlife and veterinary health. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. F, odd years.

BIOL 364L. Parasitology Laboratory. 2 Credits.

A basic parasitology laboratory to complement BIOL 364. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 364. F, odd years.

BIOL 369. Histology. 2 Credits.

Microscopical anatomy of vertebrate tissues and organs, with emphasis on man and other mammals. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. S.

BIOL 369L. Histology Lab. 2 Credits.

A basic histology laboratory to complement BIOL 369. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 369. S.

BIOL 376. Animal Biology. 3 Credits.

Evolution, morpho-anatomy, development, reproduction and other aspects of the natural history of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and BIOL 151. S.

BIOL 378. Developmental Biology. 3 Credits.

An overview of general stages and mechanisms of development, experimental approaches used to study developmental processes, and genetic and environmental influences that govern development. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L, BIOL 315 and BIOL 341. F.

BIOL 410. Molecular Biology Techniques. 4 Credits.

Applications of DNA and RNA analysis and recombinant DNA technologies, emphasizing practical experience in the laboratory. This class will meet twice a week for 50 minutes in the classroom, and students will be expected to work approximately 4-6 hours a week in the lab during open lab times. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 315 is recommended. F,S.

BIOL 415. Genomics. 4 Credits.

Genomics describes the determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of an organism and subsequent analyses to decode the structural and functional information of all genes and regulatory sequences in the genome. This four-credit course will consist of lectures, computer lab sessions, in-class exercises, take-home assignments, student presentations, and discusson of research articles. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L and BIOL 315. S.

BIOL 425. Ichthyology. 3 Credits.

Structure and function, anatomy, physiology, behavior, classification, distribution and ecologic aspects of fishes. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. F, even years.

BIOL 426. Birds & Mammals. 4 Credits.

Birds and Mammals is designed to familiarize students with avian and mammalian biology, including anatomy and physiology, behavior, ecology, evolution and conservation. Lab exercises will be integrated with lecture to emphasize taxonomy and identification. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. S.

BIOL 430. Human Dimensions of Wildlife and Fisheries. 3 Credits.

This course explores interactions among humans and fisheries and wildlife resources, with a focus on principles important for understanding and addressing wildlife management. Topics will include public attitudes, expectations and diverse values of fisheries and wildlife resources; stakeholder engagement; public relations; governance; philosophy and ethics of resource use and management; and human dimensions research methodology. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. S, odd years.

BIOL 431. Wildlife Management. 4 Credits.

Theory and methods of management of wildlife populations. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. F, odd years.

BIOL 432. Techniques in Wildlife Population Assessment. 4 Credits.

Techniques in Wildlife Population Assessment is a course designed to teach wildlife biology students the techniques used to assess wildlife populations for conservation and management. Students learn the appropriate situations to use the techniques, how to properly conduct the procedures, how to collect data from the use of these techniques, and how to report the findings to a variety of audiences. The structure of the course is designed to teach students proper research methodology so that they not only know how and when to use the techniques, but also how they can apply their findings to make appropriate management recommendations for wildlife conservation and management under a variety of settings or conditions. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. F, even years.

BIOL 433. Aquatic Ecology. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the relationships between organisms and their physical, chemical and biological environments in freshwater ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or an equivalent approved by the department. S, odd years.

BIOL 435. Large Mammal Ecology and Management. 3 Credits.

A course covering details of the population ecology, specialized management approaches and techniques, and conservation of large-bodied mammals in North America and worldwide. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L. Corequisites: BIOL 332 and BIOL 332L. F, odd years.

BIOL 438. Fisheries Management. 3 Credits.

Concepts and approaches to the management of freshwater fisheries. Course will include discussion of life histories and requirements of important regional sport fishes. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or instructor permission. S, even years.

BIOL 439. Conservation Biology. 3 Credits.

A course that integrates information from the disciplines of ecology, genetics, biogeography, economics, environmental policy, and ethics towards understanding how to maintain and restore biological diversity. F, odd years.

BIOL 442. Physiology of Organs and Systems. 3 Credits.

Study of the physiology of organs and organ systems in vertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L, and Junior or Senior standing or an equivalent approved by the department. F.

BIOL 442L. Physiology of Organs and Systems Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A physiology laboratory to complement BIOL 442. Counts as an upper-division laboratory course. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or and equivalent approved by the department. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 442. F.

BIOL 450. Molecular Genetics. 2 Credits.

Topics will include basic molecular genetic mechanisms, recombinant DNA technology, the organization and function of the cell nucleus, and the molecular control of gene expression. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, BIOL 151L, and BIOL 315 or and equivalent approved by the department. On demand.

BIOL 470. Biometry. 4 Credits.

Analysis of biological data. Covers descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (e.g., t-tests, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, ANOVA and non-parametric tests), and interpreting and presenting statistical results. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, BIOL 150L, BIOL 151, and BIOL 151L or and equivalent approved by the department. F.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382