2014-2015 Catalog

Criminal Justice

http://www.und.edu/dept/cjs/

FACULTY

UND: DiCristina, Gottschalk, Hume, Mayzer and Meyer (Graduate Program Director)

MiSU: Archambeault and Rabe

Degree Granted: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of Criminal Justice at the University of North Dakota in partnership with the Department of Criminal Justice at Minot State University offers a graduate program of study leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Criminal Justice. The program is designed to prepare students for academic teaching and research, research in government service, and higher-level administrative positions in criminal justice agencies.

While retaining a traditional core of research and study on national and international issues in the administration of criminal justice systems, this program places special emphasis on the operation and administration of criminal justice agencies and systems in rural and American Indian Tribal jurisdictions. The program also offers a specialized program of study for those individuals holding a Juris Doctorate and wishing to meet educational requirements for teaching and research positions in criminal justice higher education programs.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Department of Criminal Justice is broadly subsumed within the three functions of teaching, research and service to achieve the production and dissemination of knowledge guided by the principle of a just system of social regulation and control in the advancement of societal well-being. The goals of the teaching mission are achieved primarily through direct classroom instruction supplemented by experiential learning opportunities grounded in establishing foundations for lifelong learning. The research mission addresses both basic and applied research intended to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the discipline of Criminal Justice as well as operational issues confronting criminal justice agencies and institutions. The Department of Criminal Justice meets its service mission through participation in departmental, college, and university governance, as well as involvement in professional and community activities that contribute to the betterment of the criminal justice discipline, the community and society.

Goal 1: Develop advanced analytic and communication skills.

Goal 2: Develop advanced understanding of criminological theories.

Goal 3: Develop an advanced understanding of statistics and research methods.

Goal 4: Develop an advanced understanding of various criminal justice relevant concepts.

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

In addition to the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, the following requirements must be met by all applicants with the exception of those applying under the J.D./Ph.D. specialization:

  1. A master’s degree in criminal justice or a related field.
  2. A cumulative G.P.A. of at least 3.0 for all coursework taken for graduate credit.
  3. Achieve a minimum combined score of 300 on the verbal and quantitative components of the revised Graduate Record Exam (GRE), or a minimum combined score of 1,000 on earlier versions of the GRE.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Combined J.D/Ph.D Option: Students currently enrolled in an ABA accredited law school or individuals with a juris doctorate (J.D.) from an ABA accredited law school may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program in criminal justice. Interested individuals should contact the graduate program director for details.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Department of Criminal Justice.

  1. Complete a minimum of 60 credit hours beyond the master’s degree.
  2. Complete 9 semester hours of criminological theory and 15 semester hours of doctoral level research methods/analysis.
  3. Complete an additional 18 credit hours of electives of which:
    1. A minimum of 9 elective credits must be taken in criminal justice courses from the approved lists and not previously taken for graduate credit and,
    2. Up to 9 elective credits, not previously taken for graduate credit, may be selected from any courses approved by the student’s advisory committee and offered for graduate credit at either the University of North Dakota or Minot State University.
  4. Complete comprehensive examination in criminological theory and research methods/analysis prior to submission and approval of the dissertation prospectus.
  5. Complete an examination in one area of specialization (to be determined in consultation with the student’s advisory committee).
  6. Present and defend a dissertation proposal.
  7. Successfully defend a dissertation.

Required Curriculum:

Theory
CJ 510Historical Perspectives in Criminology (UND)3
CJ 511Contemporary Perspectives in Criminology (UND)3
CJ 515Human Nature and Crime (UND)3
Methods
CJ 520Topics in Research Methods (UND)3
CJ 522Qualitative Research Methods in Criminal Justice (UND)3
CJ 525Advanced Quantitative Methods/Analysis (UND)3
CJ 526Special Topics in Quantitative Analysis (UND)3
CJ 690 (MiSU)3
Electives (18 Credits, 9 of which must be from the following list) *
CJ 535Seminar in Juvenile Justice (UND)3
or CJ 635 (MiSU)
CJ 540Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy (UND)3
or CJ 640 (MiSU)
CJ 545Seminar in Rural Justice Issues (UND)3
or CJ 645 (MiSU)
CJ 555Seminar in Tribal Justice Systems (UND)3
or CJ 630 (MiSU)
CJ 520Topics in Research Methods (MiSU)3
CJ 540Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy (MiSU)3
CJ 530 (MiSU)3
CJ 550 (MiSU)3
CJ 580 (MiSU)3
CJ 516Theories of Punishment (UND)3
CJ 565Victimology (UND)3
CJ 592 (MiSU)3
CJ 999Dissertation (UND)18
Total Program Hours60

 

*

In consultation with the student’s Advisory Committee, up to nine elective credits, not previously taken during studies leading to an M.A. or M.S. degree, may be selected from any courses approved for graduate credit at either the University of North Dakota or Minot State University.

J.D./PH.D. Specialization

Option 1: Students who have successfully completed all requirements from an ABA accredited law school and have been awarded a Juris Doctorate (J.D.) degree may complete the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice through meeting the Theory and Methods/Statistics requirements of the doctoral program, successfully passing the comprehensive examination, and successfully defending a dissertation.

Option 2: Students currently enrolled in an ABA accredited law school may also complete requirements for the J.D./Ph.D. option. These students must successfully complete the Theory and Methods/Statistics components of the doctoral program, the comprehensive examination, and defend a dissertation. Students on this track must receive their J.D. prior to or coincident with receipt of their Ph.D.

Courses

CJ 510. Historical Perspectives in Criminology. 3 Credits.

An overview of the development of western criminological thought from the enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century. The course examines viewpoints ranging from the demonic perspective to early learning, anomie/strain, social disorganization, labeling, and conflict theories.

CJ 511. Contemporary Perspectives in Criminology. 3 Credits.

An overview of developments in criminological thought from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The course examines the growth of mainstream viewpoints (e.g., anomie/strain, learning, and control theories) and critical criminology (e.g., Marxist, feminist, post-modern, and peacemaking perspectives). Prerequisite: CJ 510.

CJ 515. Human Nature and Crime. 3 Credits.

This course examines historical and contemporary applications of the concept of "human nature" in explanations of criminal behavior. Attention is also given to the role played by "human nature" in the evaluation of social institutions that react to crime and deviance. Finally, attempts to integrate biological and cultural explanations of human behavior as they pertain to crime will be addressed. Prerequisite: CJ 510.

CJ 516. Theories of Punishment. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the variety of attempts to describe, justify and explain punishment as a feature of human social life. Emphasis is placed on criminal punishment, but extra-legal punishments and their relationship to criminal punishments are also explored. Prerequisite: CJ 510.

CJ 520. Topics in Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An examination of philosophical underpinnings of the scientific method in social research. The course examines epistemological and ontological debates in contemporary social research and their application to research design.

CJ 522. Qualitative Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

An examination of the underlying rationale, methods, and limitations of qualitative research in criminal justice. Topics include ethnographic research, action research, historical research, case studies, and content analysis.

CJ 525. Advanced Quantitative Methods/Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to familiarize students with advanced multivariate statistical techniques. Topics include regression analysis, factor analysis and path analysis. Other specific statistical analysis techniques may also be explored. Prerequisite: SOC 521 or consent of the instructor.

CJ 526. Special Topics in Quantitative Analysis. 3 Credits.

Variable topics exploring advanced statistical methods/analytical techniques such as time-series analysis, structural equation models, logistics regression, hierarchical linear modeling, categorical-data analysis and general linear models. Topics to be determined based on student demand. Prerequisite: CJ 525 or consent of instructor.

CJ 535. Seminar in Juvenile Justice. 3 Credits.

Variable topics addressing the administration of the juvenile justice system and juvenile justice policy. Course will consist of lectures, discussion, and readings. Repeatable to 9 credits. Prerequisite: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D program.

CJ 540. Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy. 3 Credits.

Variable topics addressing policy and policy development in the criminal justice system, including police, prosecution, courts, and corrections systems. Course will consist of lectures, discussion and readings. Repeatable to 9 credits. Prerequisite: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D program.

CJ 545. Seminar in Rural Justice Issues. 3 Credits.

Variable topics addressing issues in the administration of policing, prosecution, courts, and corrections in rural areas, course will consist of lectures, discussion and readings. Repeatable to 9 credits. Prerequisite: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D program.

CJ 555. Seminar in Tribal Justice Systems. 3 Credits.

Variable topics addressing the administration of criminal justice in Indian territory. Course will consist of lectures, discussion and readings. Repeatable to 9 credits. Prerequisites: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D program and IS 420.

CJ 565. Victimology. 3 Credits.

This course provides an analysis of the literature and research concerning criminal victimization. Attention will be directed toward current trends concerning the victim in the American criminal justice system with particular emphasis on measuring victimization, the impact of victimization and victim's rights and compensation initiatives. Prerequisite: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D. program or consent of the instructor.

CJ 594. Practicum: Research. 1-6 Credits.

This course is intended to place advanced students in criminal justice agencies as research analysts. Students will be under the supervision of a program faculty member and are expected to carry out research at the direction of an agency director or designee. Prerequisites: CJ 621 and consent of instructor.

CJ 597. Administrative Internship. 1-6 Credits.

Students are employed on a full-time or part-time basis in on-the-job assignments related to the administration of criminal justice agencies of federal, state or local governments. Students are required to produce an analytical report based on internship responsibilities. Prerequisite: Admission into Criminal Justice Ph.D program or consent of instructor.

CJ 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

CJ 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Original research project suitable for publication. Repeatable to 18 credits. Prerequisites: Successful completion of comprehensive exams and consent of department.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382