2014-2015 Catalog

Psychology

http://www.und.edu/dept/psych/

Bradley, Derenne, De Young, Ferraro, Grabe, Holm, Kehn, Kelly, King, Legerski, Looby, McDonald, Miller, Peters, Petros, Plumm, Poltavski, Ruthig, Terrance, Terrell, Weatherly (Chair), and Wise

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Psychology Department in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Dakota offers graduate degrees in Forensic Psychology (M.A. and M.S.), General/Experimental Psychology (Ph.D.), and Clinical Psychology (Ph.D.). The Clinical Psychology program is accredited by the American Psychological Association. The Psychology Department does not admit students who wish to earn only a Master of Arts degree in general psychology without continuation on to the Ph.D. degree in either clinical or general -experimental psychology. Students are admitted directly into the Ph.D. program in clinical or general-experimental psychology and will be awarded a Master of Arts degree in general psychology upon completion of the following requirements:

  • Completion of “Scholarly Tool” coursework to develop skills in as well as and ;
  • Completion of an empirical , 6 credits);
  • Completion of a minimum of 20 elective PSYC course credits at the 500-level or above which are approved by the respective advisory committee and documented in the Program of Study. A maximum of eight credits may be transferred from another institution. Fifteen credits must be completed on campus through UND.

A list of all programs offered, including admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Clinical Psychology Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Core Program Faculty: Bradley, Holm, King, Legerski, Looby, McDonald (INPSYDE Director), Miller (Director of Clinical Training and the Psychological Training Center) and Wise

Associated Program Faculty: Derenne, De Young, Ferraro, Grabe, Kehn, Peters, Petros, Plumm, Ruthig, Terrance, Terrell, and Weatherly (Department Chair)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology is to train scientist-practitioners. The scientist-practitioner model of education and training in psychology is an integrative approach to science and practice wherein each must continually inform the other. This model represents more than a summation of both parts. Scientist-practitioner psychologists embody a research orientation in their practice and practice relevance in their research. Thus, a scientist-practitioner is not defined by a job title or a role, but rather by an integrated approach to both science and practice. The model entails development of interlocking skills to foster a career-long process of psychological investigation, assessment, and intervention.

Goal 1: The clinical program will recruit qualified and capable students who are committed and prepared to complete program requirements in a timely manner.

Goal 2: Graduates of our program will demonstrate a base of knowledge regarding the field of psychology, which extends beyond specialized clinical areas.

Goal 3: Graduates of our program will demonstrate an ability to design, conduct, analyze, and disseminate research that advances knowledge regarding the practice of clinical psychology.

Goal 4: Graduates of our program will demonstrate knowledge in psychopathology and competency in the delivery of a wide range of clinical assessment and psychotherapy services that are theory based and empirically-supported.

Goal 5: Graduates of our program will display ethical and professional conduct with sensitivity to the importance of cultural diversity and individual differences in understanding human psychological functioning.

Forensic Psychology Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The M.S. program is committed to providing quality instruction and training in the field of modern forensic psychology in order to serve those interested in careers in forensic psychology or wanting preparation for doctoral programs in psychology or other professional programs like law school or criminal justice.

  1. Establish a solid foundational background in psychological concepts and skills similar to those offered in many graduate programs in psychology, particularly those with an applied emphasis.
  2. Provide students with specific forensic-relevant coursework and experiences.
  3. Provide students an opportunity to receive supervised fieldwork in forensic settings.
  4. Give students an opportunity to participate in faculty-directed research and conduct their own independent research with a thesis.
  5. Prepare students for admission into Ph.D. or Psy.D. graduate programs.

Forensic Psychology Master of Arts (M.A.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The MA program is committed to providing equality instruction and training in the field of modern forensic psychology in order to serve the educational and professional needs of those working or living at a distance from UND.

  1. Establish a solid foundational background at the Master’s level in psychological concepts and skills similar to those offered in many graduate programs in psychology, particularly those with an applied emphasis.
  2. Provide students with specific forensic-relevant coursework and experiences.
  3. Allow students an opportunity to receive supervised fieldwork and/or to do a research project as independent study under the direction of a program faculty.
  4. Prepare students for admission into Ph.D. or Psy.D. graduate programs.

General/Experimental Psychology Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Core Program Faculty: Derenne (Program Director), Ferraro, Grabe, Kalbfleish, Kehn, Kelly, Peters, Petros, Plumm, Poltavski, Ruthig, Terrance, Terrell, Weatherly (Department Chair)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the University of North Dakota (UND) General/Experimental (G/E) Ph.D. program is to provide quality educational experiences to qualified graduate students that promote critical thinking and creative skills based on the current theory, principles, and methodologies and techniques of experimental psychology. These will be promoted through written as well as oral communication. Graduates of our program will be prepared for careers as academicians at the college and/or university level, researchers in private industry and education, and/or teachers at the college and/or university level and will all show continued evidence of expertise within their various specialization in G/E psychology. G/E students should anticipate and expect broad exposure to a variety of issues and topics in the field of experimental psychology and, as a result, each student is expected to establish a firm theoretical and academic foundation that will support their later pursuit of more specialized academic interests. This will be in evidence via a broad breadth of knowledge appropriate to receiving a MA and/or PhD in General/Experimental Psychology. The G/E faculty have two specific goals in mind for students; these include:

Goal 1: Students of the G/E program will demonstrate a base of knowledge regarding the field of experimental psychology, which will extend beyond specialized experimental areas.

Goal 2: Students of the G/E program will demonstrate ability to design, conduct, analyze, and report/disseminate research that advances the scientific study of psychology.

 

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university. For U.S. degrees, accreditation must be by one of the six regional accrediting associations.
  2. Eighteen (18) hours of undergraduate work in psychology including a course in General Psychology, Developmental, Abnormal, Statistics, and Experimental Psychology.
  3. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.20 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A= 4.00).
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  5. A year of biological science (biology, physiology, etc.).
  6. A semester of college algebra.
  7. General background in other social and natural sciences also recommended.
  8. Graduate Record Examination—30th percentile or higher on Verbal and Quantitative and 2.5 or higher on Analytic Writing and Subject.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Arts degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Psychology Department.

The Psychology Department does not admit students who wish to earn only a Master of Arts degree in general psychology without continuation on to the Ph.D. degree in either clinical or general-experimental psychology. Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in clinical or general-experimental psychology will be awarded a Master of Arts degree in general psychology upon completion of the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. A maximum of eight credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  3. Completion of “Scholarly Tool” coursework to develop skills in research design including:
    PSYC 541Advanced Univariate Statistics3
    PSYC 542Multivariate Statistics for Psychology3
    PSYC 543Experimental Design3
  4. Completion of an empirical thesis (, 6 credits)
  5. Completion of a minimum of 15 elective PSYC course credits at the 500-level or above which are approved by the respective advisory committee and documented in the Program of Study. Fifteen credits must be completed on campus through UND.

 

Clinical Psychology Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university. For U.S. degrees, accreditation must be by one of the six regional accrediting associations.
  2. Eighteen (18) hours of undergraduate work in psychology including a course in General Psychology, Developmental, Abnormal, Statistics, and Experimental Psychology.
  3. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.2 for all undergraduate work.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  5. A year of biological science (biology, physiology, etc.).
  6. A semester of college algebra.
  7. General background in other social and natural sciences also recommended.
  8. Graduate Record Examination— 30th percentile or higher for both (Verbal, Quantitative), 2.5 or higher (Analytic Writing) and Subject.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Psychology Department.

  1. Minimum of 60 credit hours beyond 30 credits from M.A. degree work is required for the Ph.D. (minimum of 90 credit hours total).
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of “Scholarly Tool” coursework to develop skills in research design including:
    PSYC 541Advanced Univariate Statistics3
    PSYC 542Multivariate Statistics for Psychology3
    PSYC 543Experimental Design3
  4. Completion of an empirical dissertation;
  5. Graduate students in the clinical psychology Ph.D. program are required to meet a number of eligibility criteria to take comprehensive exams and establish candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. An assessment will be conducted after the student successfully completes all of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree in general psychology. To remain in the Ph.D. program and proceed on to comprehensive exams, practicum assignments, dissertation research, and remaining coursework, the student must have:
    1. earned a cumulative graduate grade point average of at least 3.5;
    2. completed his or her M.A. degree within three years of enrollment;
    3. gained the approval of a majority of the core and associated faculty of the clinical psychology doc- toral program.
      Students failing to meet one or more of these requirements will be terminated from the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology.
  6. Completion of the comprehensive examination for the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.
  7. Completion of the following for the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology:
    One calendar year of full-time internship (usually during the fifth year)3
    Practicum experience which includes
    PSYC 580Clinical Practice8
    PSYC 587Supervised Field Work13
    Clinical coursework
    PSYC 570Clinical Assessment I:Basic Issues in Clinical Assesssment4
    PSYC 571Clinical Assessment II:Advanced Issues in Clinical Assessment4
    PSYC 573Theories of Psychotherapy3
    PSYC 574Advanced Therapeutic Interventions3
    PSYC 575Behavior Pathology3
    PSYC 579Professional Issues and Ethics in Psychology3
    PSYC 594Special Topics in Psychology2
    Foundation coursework in
    History of Psychology
    PSYC 505History of Psychology3
    Social Bases of Behavior
    PSYC 560Advanced Social Psychology3
    Biological Bases of Behavior
    PSYC 535Physiological Psychology3
    or PSYC 537 Psychophysiology
    Cognitive/affective bases of behavior
    PSYC 533Theories of Learning3
    or PSYC 539 Cognitive Psychology
    Developmental Basis of Behavior
    PSYC 576Child Psychopathology and Treatment3
    or PSYC 551 Advanced Developmental Psych
    Diversity Elective
    PSYC 521Diversity Psychology3
    Research Credits
    Master’s Thesis6
    Dissertation13
    Total Credits83

 

Forensic Psychology Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a behavioral or social science major allied with psychology, e.g., psychology, criminal justice, sociology, counseling, and social work.
  2. Applicants must have a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.2 or above or a graduae degree GPA of 3.5.
  3. Applicant must also submit GRE scores, with Analytic GRE writing test score >2.5; and Verbal and Quantitative GRE scores must both equal or exceed the 30th percentile. The Psychology subject GRE test is also required. Applicants not meeting these standards may be admitted on a provisional basis with continued enrollment contingent on successful performance in the program.
  4. A 250-300 word personal statement discussing:
    1. academic and professional accomplishments;
    2. reasons for pursuing a graduate degree in Forensic Psychology;
    3. research interests; and
    4. any additional information the applicant would like the admission committee to know.
  5. Three letters of recommendation from those who can comment on the applicant’s academic abilities are also required. Consideration will be given for experience working in forensic areas or participating in research as an assistant prior to the program application.
  6. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Science degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Forensic Psychology program.

Students in the M.S. Forensic Psychology Program at UND are required to complete 45 credits. This includes 27 credits of required coursework, 12 credits of elective courses, and a minimum of 6 credit hours for thesis work. The Forensic Psychology program does not have a comprehensive examination. 

Required Core Courses (27 credits):

PSYC 520Foundations of Forensic Psychology3
PSYC 521Diversity Psychology3
PSYC 523Forensic Assessment3
PSYC 524Psychology and Law3
PSYC 541Advanced Univariate Statistics3
PSYC 542Multivariate Statistics for Psychology3
PSYC 543Experimental Design3
PSYC 575Behavior Pathology3
PSYC 593Readings in Psychology1-3
PSYC 998Thesis1-9
Elective Courses (12 credits):
Choose four of the following:12
Psychological Foundations Educ
Psychological Profiling and Criminal Behavior
Cognitive Psychology
Advanced Social Psychology
Child Psychopathology and Treatment
Supervised Field Work
Special Topics in Psychology
Special Topics in Psychology
Special Topics in Psychology
Human Nature and Crime
Seminar in Juvenile Justice
Victimology
Total Credits38-48

Note: The student’s Advisory Committee will also consider other graduate classes as appropriate electives on a case-by-case basis. Students who have a strong psychology undergraduate background may, after review by the Committee, be permitted to substitute an appropriate forensic psychology class.

 

Forensic Psychology Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a behavioral or social science major allied with psychology, i.e., psychology, criminal justice, sociology, counseling or social work.
  2. A cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or above, or a graduate degree GPA of 3.50.
  3. Submission of a 250-300 word personal statement describing:
    1. academic and professional accomplishments;
    2. reasons for pursuing a graduate degree in Forensic Psychology; and
    3. any additional information the applicant would like the admission committee to know.
  4. Submission of three letters of recommendation from those who can comment on your academic abilities or ability to understand complex issues and think critically, e.g. former faculty member or work supervisor.
  5. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Forensic Psychology program.

The general degree requirements for the Master of Arts degree in the Forensic Psychology include a minimum of 34 credits of coursework:

Required Core Courses (25 credits):

PSYC 520Foundations of Forensic Psychology3
PSYC 521Diversity Psychology3
PSYC 524Psychology and Law3
PSYC 528Forensic Psychology Capstone (summer, 2 weeks on campus immediately prior to graduation)2
PSYC 541Advanced Univariate Statistics3
PSYC 560Advanced Social Psychology3
PSYC 575Behavior Pathology3
PSYC 593Readings in Psychology1-3
PSYC 997Independent Study (research or practicum experience possible)2
Elective Courses (9 credits):
Choose 3 of the following:9
Psychological Foundations Educ
Psychological Profiling and Criminal Behavior
Cognitive Psychology
Child Psychopathology and Treatment
Supervised Field Work
Special Topics in Psychology
Special Topics in Psychology
Special Topics in Psychology
Total Credits32-34

Note: The student’s Advisory Committee will also consider other graduate classes as appropriate electives on a case-by-case basis. Students who have a strong psychology background may, after review by the Committee, be permitted to substitute an appropriate forensic psychology graduate elective for a required program course. A maximum of eight graduate credits may be transferred from another institution.

 

General/Experimental Psychology Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university. For U.S. degrees, accreditation must be by one of the six regional accrediting associations.
  2. Eighteen (18) hours of undergraduate work in psychology including a course in General Psychology, Developmental, Abnormal, Statistics, and Experimental Psychology.
  3. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.20 for all undergraduate work.
  4. Graduate Record Examination— 30th percentile or higher on both (Verbal, Quantitative), 2.5 or higher (Analytic Writing and Subject). The Psychology subject GRE test is also required.
  5. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  6. A year of biological science (biology, physiology, etc.).
  7. A semester of college algebra.
  8. General background in other social and natural sciences also recommended.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Psychology Department.

  1. Minimum of 60 credit hours beyond 30 credits from M.A. degree work is required for the Ph.D. (minimum of 90 credit hours total).
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of “Scholarly Tool” coursework to develop skills in research design including:
    PSYC 541Advanced Univariate Statistics3
    PSYC 542Multivariate Statistics for Psychology3
    PSYC 543Experimental Design3
  4. Completion of an empirical dissertation.
  5. Graduate students in the general-experimental psychology Ph.D. program are required to meet a number of eligibility criteria to take comprehensive exams and establish candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. An assessment will be conducted after the student successfully completes all of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree in general psychology. To remain in the Ph.D. program and proceed on to comprehensive exams, dissertation research, and remaining coursework, the student must have
    1. earned a cumulative graduate grade point average of at least 3.5;
    2. completed his or her M.A. degree within three years of enrollment;
    3. gained the approval of a majority of the core and associated faculty of the General/Experimental psychology doctoral program.
      Students failing to meet one or more of these requirements will be terminated from the Ph.D. program in general-experimental psychology.
  6. Completion of the comprehensive examination for the Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology.

 

Minor in Psychology

Graduate students taking major work in other departments and graduate minor work in psychology for a master’s degree should have the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in psychology with the following specific courses: Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Abnormal Psychology (or the equivalent). Any of the psychology courses, which carry graduate credit, are acceptable for the graduate minor.

Graduate students taking major work in another department and minor work in psychology for a doctoral degree, in addition to having the undergraduate preparation noted in the paragraph above, must also have completed a course in statistics and an undergraduate laboratory course in Experimental Psychology. No specific courses are required for the graduate minor except that all credits for the minor must be 500-level credits.

Minor in Psychology

Graduate students taking major work in other departments and graduate minor work in psychology for a master’s degree should have the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in psychology with the following specific courses: PSYC 111 Introduction to Psychology, PSYC 250 Developmental Psychology, PSYC 270 Abnormal Psychology (or the equivalent). Any of the psychology courses, which carry graduate credit, are acceptable for the graduate minor.

Graduate students taking major work in another department and minor work in psychology for a doctoral degree, in addition to having the undergraduate preparation noted in the paragraph above, must also have completed a course in statistics and an undergraduate laboratory course in Experimental Psychology. No specific courses are required for the graduate minor except that all credits for the minor must be 500-level credits.

Courses

PSYC 501. Psychological Foundations Educ. 3 Credits.

A study of the learning process with secondary emphasis on how the learning process is affected by individual differences, growth, development, and personality. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or Education.

PSYC 505. History of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Historical development of modern psychology with an emphasis on experimental and systematic phases of early psychological thought, on important issues during the growth of psychology, and on current trends. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or Counseling.

PSYC 520. Foundations of Forensic Psychology. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 521. Diversity Psychology. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced consideration of the major issues in the study of diversity as it applies to the field of psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 523. Forensic Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with 1) a review of assessment measures used in forensic assessment 2) an in-depth study of ethical and professional issues in forensic assessment, and 3) training in writing assessment reports. S.

PSYC 524. Psychology and Law. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of the interaction between the disciplines of psychology and law. The course will look at how psychological research and theories are applied to contemporary legal issues. Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 526. Psychological Profiling and Criminal Behavior. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 528. Forensic Psychology Capstone. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Graduate status in M.A. Forensic Psychology, PSYC 997, and expected graduation of the summer semester the course is taken.

PSYC 533. Theories of Learning. 3 Credits.

Examination of the evidences in support of the various systematic theories of learning. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Counseling or Psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 535. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

Physiological basis of psychological functions.

PSYC 537. Psychophysiology. 3 Credits.

Examination of the anatomy and physiology of several physiologic systems, the relationships between behavior and physiology, and the importance of individual differences in physiological responses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology.

PSYC 539. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis and discussion (including laboratory work) of topics covering issues related to memory, attention, problem solving, comprehension, and thinking. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 541. Advanced Univariate Statistics. 3 Credits.

Theory of univariate statistics; application to quantitative data in psychology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, college algebra, and elementary statisitcs.

PSYC 542. Multivariate Statistics for Psychology. 3 Credits.

The appropriate use and interpretation of multivariate data analytic techniques in psychology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and PSYC 541.

PSYC 543. Experimental Design. 3 Credits.

Application of statistics and probability theory to the design and analysis of experiments. Prerequisite: PSYC 541 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 551. Advanced Developmental Psych. 3 Credits.

In-depth analysis and integration of theories and theorists relevant for current issues in lifespan developmental psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology or permission of instructor.

PSYC 560. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

In-depth examination of the theoretical and empirical literature in social psychology focusing on attitudes, stereotyping and prejudice, interpersonal relationships, social cognition, personality and the self, and group behavior. Also includes additional course readings and written work beyond the requirements for Psychology 460. Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology.

PSYC 565. Multicultural Psychology. 3 Credits.

Examinations of cross-cultural work in psychology with attention to race, ethnicity, and culture. Special emphasis is given to research, training, and treatment issues with minority groups, including the American Indian and other cultural groups. Prerequisite: Graduate status in Psychology.

PSYC 570. Clinical Assessment I:Basic Issues in Clinical Assesssment. 4 Credits.

Provides the conceptual and practical frameworks upon which to build expertise in the assessment and prediction of human behavior in relation to intellectual indices and interviewing skills. Serves as a graduate foundation to explore, analyze, and discuss basic and applied issues relevant to psychological testing, the administration and interpretation of widely-used intellectual assessment instruments, and the opportunity to develop structured clinical interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: Clinical Psychology graduate status or consent of instructor.

PSYC 571. Clinical Assessment II:Advanced Issues in Clinical Assessment. 4 Credits.

Provides the conceptual and practical frameworks upon which to build expertise in the assessment and prediction of human behavior in relation to personality assessment, behavioral assessment, neuropsychological assessment, and the assessment of high incidence behavioral disorders. Skills in report writing and case conference presentation will also be developed. Prerequisites: PSYC 570 and/or consent of instructor.

PSYC 572. Community Psychology. 3 Credits.

Theories and practicum in community mental health consultation. Credits in 587 may be earned in conjunction with this course. Prerequisites: PSYC 571, PSYC 573, and graduate standing in Psychology.

PSYC 573. Theories of Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Theory and practicum in individual psychotherapy, with emphasis on systematic comparison of major theoretical viewpoints. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 571 and/or consent of instructor.

PSYC 574. Advanced Therapeutic Interventions. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the key issues of psychotherapy research with a focus on critical evaluation of the psychotherapy research literature and the development of knowledge of empirically supported approaches to psychotherapy with specific problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 573 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 575. Behavior Pathology. 3 Credits.

A survey of various forms of behavior pathology with emphasis upon current research and theories relating to pathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 270 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 576. Child Psychopathology and Treatment. 3 Credits.

An overview of child and developmental psychopathology including discussion of pertinent treatments for disorders such as conduct disorders, attention-deficit, substance abuse, and developmental disabilities. Prerequisites: PSYC 570 and PSYC 575 or instructor permission.

PSYC 579. Professional Issues and Ethics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

An exploration of ethical issues pertinent to the science and practice of psychology and discussion of current professional issues facing psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology is the prerequisite.

PSYC 580. Clinical Practice. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised individual practice in techniques of individual psychotherapy, marital therapy, counseling, and guidance of parents and children, administration of psychological examinations, behavior modification, community mental health procedures, consultation, and other professional practices of the clinical psychologist. Prerequisites: PSYC 571, graduate standing in Psychology, and consent of instructor.

PSYC 587. Supervised Field Work. 1-3 Credits.

Used primarily for individualized field placement so that the student may acquire practicum experiences in clinical settings, community psychology, and group methods. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology and consent of instructor.

PSYC 593. Readings in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing in Psychology and consent of instructor.

PSYC 594. Special Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Topical courses in Psychology organized on a semester-by-semester basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 595. Seminar in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 596. Individual Research. 1-6 Credits.

PSYC 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

PSYC 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Graduate status in M.A. Forensic Psychology program and apprpval of an advisor for the course from program faculty.

PSYC 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

PSYC 999. Dissertation. 1-18 Credits.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382