2016-2017 Catalog

Communication

http://arts-sciences.und.edu/communication

FACULTY: Antonova (Graduate Director), Fiordo, Kim, Kalbfleisch, Lee, Pasch, Rakow, and Shafer

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Communication 

The Communication Program offers a graduate program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree will earn a non-thesis Master’s degree as part of completing the Doctoral program. The Communication Program does not admit students who wish to earn only a Master of Arts degree in Communication without continuation on to the Ph.D. degree.

The intent of the Ph.D. program is to graduate students with scholarly competencies enabling them to assume roles as intellectual leaders of the field of international and intercultural communication as well as public intellectuals stimulating discussion of significant communication issues.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

The Ph.D. program in international and intercultural communication is administered and assessed according to specific Goals for Student Learning.  The faculty has identified the follow learning goals for the program:

  1. Students will be able to identify, articulate, and critically evaluate the theoretical perspectives that guide international/intercultural communication research
  2. Students will be able to identify, articulate, and critically evaluate the major areas of international/intercultural research
  3. Students will be able to conduct scientifically sound research in the area of international/intercultural communication
  4. Students will be able to publish scholarly research in international/ intercultural communication in well-respected outlets
  5. Students will be able appropriately apply ethical guidelines to international/intercultural communication research
  6. Students will be able to write competitive grant proposals in the areas of international/intercultural communication

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

The Communication Graduate Faculty will recommend admission based on the following applications materials.

Master of Arts in Communication:

  1. A letter of application, including a statement of purpose answering the question of why one would be interested in advanced study of communication. This letter should also include an indication of a faculty member with whom applicant might work.
  2. Acceptable performance on Graduate Record Examination General Test.
  3. Completion of the equivalent of 20 undergraduate credits in speech communication and/or mass communication, journalism or related field, including at least 12 upper division credits.
  4. Provide a transcript with a minimum 3.0 undergraduate Grade Point Average.
  5. Three letters of recommendation.
  6. To be considered for a teaching assistantship, the student must submit a statement of teaching philosophy.
  7. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  8. Optional materials, including writing or work samples.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Art degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Communication Program.

Required core courses for all Communication Master’s students:

COMM 501Theoretical Perpectives in Communication3
COMM 505Concepts in Quantitative Communication Research3
COMM 506Concepts in Qualitative Communication Research3

Thesis Option

Students choosing the thesis option must meet the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 30 credits in communication are required if a minor or cognate is not chosen.
  2. The coordinator of graduate studies appoints a three-person advisory committee from the Graduate Faculty, normally drawn from the Communication Program and chaired by the student’s adviser.
  3. Candidates are administered written comprehensive examinations after the completion of 18 hours of graduate credit.
  4. Thesis topics must be approved by the student’s faculty advisory committee, with research conducted under the guidance of the student’s faculty advisory committee, then completed to the satisfaction of the faculty advisory committee with a final oral examination.

Non-Thesis Option with Professional Portfolio

Students choosing the non-thesis option whose final project is a professional portfolio must meet the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 32 credits in communication are required if a minor or cognate is not chosen.
  2. The coordinator of graduate studies appoints a four-person advisory committee comprised of three Graduate Faculty, normally drawn from the Communication Program and chaired by the student’s adviser, plus an external professional member to the committee who serves in an advisory capacity only.
  3. Candidates will be expected to prepare a professional portfolio to be examined by their advisory committee.
  4. Portfolio content must be approved by the student’s advisory committee, completed under the guidance of the student’s advisory committee, with a review of the completed professional portfolio to the satisfaction of the advisory committee.

A Minor or Cognate Option

  1. If a minor or cognate is approved by a student’s faculty advisory committee, the student will be required to take the same amount of credits required for a major (30 credits for the thesis option or 32 credits for the non-thesis option with professional portfolio) with a minimum of 20 credits in communication and a minimum of 9 credits in a minor or cognate.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements for consideration for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the Communication Program include:

  1. Cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher OR MA degree in Communication
  2. Statement of interest, including personal goals and the relevance of the Ph.D. in Communication to those goals.
  3. Original academic paper, 10-15 pages in length, reflecting the student’s ability to articulate and synthesize ideas.
  4. Three letters of recommendation from sources familiar with the applicant’s potential as a doctoral student in Communication.
  5. Graduate Record Examination General Test.
  6. To be considered for a teaching assistantship, the student must submit a statement of teaching philosophy and letters of recommendation must address the student’s teaching abilities.
  7. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Note: Students whose native language is not English are not permitted to hold teaching assistantships unless they have attained a score of at least 50 on the SPEAK (Speaking Proficiency English Assessment Kit) or the TSE (Test of Spoken English). The test is administered at the University, after the student arrives on campus.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Communication Program.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree set forth by the Communication Program include:

  1. Completion of 90 semester credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. Thirty credit hours from a Master’s degree in communication or related discipline may be applied toward the 90 credit hours.
  2. Core Requirements, including: (15 cr)
    COMM 501Theoretical Perpectives in Communication3
    COMM 505Concepts in Quantitative Communication Research3
    COMM 506Concepts in Qualitative Communication Research3
    COMM 535Intercultural Communication3
    COMM 550International and Global Communication3
  3. Elective Requirements from COMM (minimum of 21 credits chosen from the list below)
    COMM 512Communication Ethics, Law, and Regulation3
    COMM 515International and Intercultural Narrative Communication3
    COMM 525Interpersonal Relations and Communication3
    COMM 528Intercultural Global Conflict3
    COMM 530Gender, Culture, and Communication3
    COMM 533Communication and International Development3
    COMM 538International Media3
    COMM 540Communication and Organizations3
    COMM 543International and Intercultural Indigenous Communication3
    COMM 549Communication Technologies, Society, & Diversity3
    COMM 570Seminar in Communication3
  4. Additional Electives (minimum of 15 credits chosen from the list below)
    Interdisciplinary coursework (maximum 9 credits)
    Remaining courses from COMM electives above
    COMM 591 Individual Readings and Research may be taken at discretion of Committee
  5. Completion of a non-thesis MA research project (9 credits: these may be taken as COMM 997 Credits)
  6. Comprehensive Examination
  7. Dissertation (15 cr)


 

Courses

COMM 501. Theoretical Perpectives in Communication. 3 Credits.

Course provides a conceptual and historical overview of Communication Studies, paying special attention to questions of epistemology. F.

COMM 505. Concepts in Quantitative Communication Research. 3 Credits.

In the two-part 505/506 course, students focus on honing their understanding of the quantitative/qualitative paradigm in Communication research. While this course section focuses on the various methods that fall under the labels of quantitative, both portions of the course seek to identify possible points of connection and resistance across the spectrum of methodological choices and require participation in Communication Program colloquium series. F, odd years.

COMM 506. Concepts in Qualitative Communication Research. 3 Credits.

In the two-part 505/506 course, students focus on honing their understanding of the quantitative/qualitative paradigm in Communication research. While this course section focuses on the various methods that fall under the labels of qualitative, both portions of the course seek to identify possible points of connection and resistance across the spectrum of methodological choices and require participation in Communication Program colloquium series. F, even years.

COMM 512. Communication Ethics, Law, and Regulation. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the ethical foundations of media law and communication public policy.

COMM 515. International and Intercultural Narrative Communication. 3 Credits.

This course examines narration or narrative communication within and between cultures and nations. Narration and communication theory and practice are explored for content and used as method. Assessing narrative communication in terms of international and intercultural comprehension and acceptance is addressed. On demand.

COMM 525. Interpersonal Relations and Communication. 3 Credits.

Face-to-face and mediated transactions between two people or people in small groups in diverse settings. Deals with inquiry, conflict management, interpersonal sensitivity, individuality, and conformity.

COMM 528. Intercultural Global Conflict. 3 Credits.

Communication patterns and processes can both facilitate conflict and terrorism as well as reduce discord and violence. Communication and conflict theory and research are examined in a global context with implications for terrorism, insurgency, and violence. Intergroup communication as well as communication strategies for mitigating discord and enhancing violence reduction are considered. On demand.

COMM 530. Gender, Culture, and Communication. 3 Credits.

An examination of how males and females from different cultural, ethnic and national backgrounds use, and are portrayed by, communication institutions and processes. Covers issues of representation, identity and difference.

COMM 533. Communication and International Development. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to theoretical foundations of historical and contemporary issues in communication, media, information and international development. 21st century dynamic geopolitical processes are studied in relation to the issues of state-building, modernization, dependency, and globalization. On demand.

COMM 535. Intercultural Communication. 3 Credits.

This course incorporates critical conceptualizations of identity, "the Other", and multiculturalism. It explores theoretical reflections of the symbolic systems of unfamiliar cultures, and the emergence of mutual understanding.

COMM 538. International Media. 3 Credits.

This course provides a comparison of media systems, media flows, and communication among countries. Both theoretical and ethnographic perspectives are considered by examining global media patterns and local flows through particular cultures around the world. The theoretical approaches of hybridism and post-colonialism are applied. On demand.

COMM 540. Communication and Organizations. 3 Credits.

Examines the general communication processes and dynamics within and among organizations and explores the dynamics in network organizations, with a particular focus on communication in interpersonal groups and inter-organizational working teams. Theories of power and politics in and among organizations, as well as of decision-making, conflict management, and strategic communication are explored.

COMM 543. International and Intercultural Indigenous Communication. 3 Credits.

This course examines communication within and between indigenous and non-indigenous people internationally, interculturally, and interlinguistically. Ramifications and conceptualizations related to comprehension and acceptance in communicating within and between indigenous people in international and intercultural settings is addressed. On demand.

COMM 549. Communication Technologies, Society, & Diversity. 3 Credits.

A critical study of theoretical components of the so-called "Information Society," which addresses the interaction of communication technologies with individuals, communities, economies, and cultures. This course focuses on aspects of technological change, new patterns of global connectedness, and their implications for emerging global paradigms. On demand.

COMM 550. International and Global Communication. 3 Credits.

An analysis of international media, comparative telecommunications systems and globalization. Covers issues such as transnational communication, global journalism, satellite broadcasting and communication in diplomacy and international affairs.

COMM 570. Seminar in Communication. 3 Credits.

In-depth studies in specific communication areas such as relational communication, rhetoric and public discourse, intercultural/international communication. May be repeated for credit with change of topic (up to 15 hours). Repeatable to 15 credits.

COMM 591. Individual Readings and Research. 3 Credits.

Directed readings and research in speech communication and mass communication topics and issues. May be repeated to a total of 12 credits. 3 credit limit per semester. Repeatable to 12 credits.

COMM 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

COMM 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

COMM 998. Thesis. 1-4 Credits.

4 credits required for thesis option. Repeatable to 9 credits.

COMM 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 15 credits. Repeatable to 15 credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

COMM 310. Media and Diversity. 3 Credits.

Study of minority status within mass media organizations and in media content from historical, contemporary and speculative points of view. F.

COMM 401. Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

Analysis of communication behavior in formally structured relationships as it relates to the organization and to individuals. Special attention given to organizational style, status, trust and conflict-management. Informal communication networks and rumoring are studied. S.

COMM 402. Intercultural/International Communication. 3 Credits.

This course will provide an overview of the study of intercultural and international communication. Topics addressed will include: history, literature, and culture of specific groups including racial, religious, and ethnic issues that affect communication patterns and outcomes. S.

COMM 404. Advertising and Society. 3 Credits.

Examines and evaluates the social, ethical and economic aspects of advertising. Attention is given to appraising the effects of advertising on the consumer and competition. F.

COMM 405. Social Implications of the Information Society. 3 Credits.

Considers and evaluates different perspectives on the information society, ranging from humanistic and Neomarxist critiques to the optimistic scenarios of some futurists. Examines the implications of new means of creating, storing, manipulating and disseminating information. Discussion of whether or not the potential benefits will be realized. S.

COMM 428. Media History. 3 Credits.

Origins and evolution of human communication, mass media and related technological innovations. Addresses mass media's historical influence on social , political and economic change, as well as on maintaining the status quo. S.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382