2014-2015 Catalog

English Language and Literature

http://arts-sciences.und.edu/english/

FACULTY: Alberts, Basgier, Beard, Carson, Conway, Czerwiec, Dixon, Donehower, Flynn, Harris, Huang, Kitzes, Koepke, Nelson (Graduate Program Director), O’Donnell, Ommen, Pasch, Robison, Sauer, Shafer, Weaver-Hightower and Wolfe (Chair)

Degrees Granted: Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The University of North Dakota Department of English offers a varied program of studies in English and American literature, writing, and the English language. The academic atmosphere is intimate, class size for graduate courses is small, and students are encouraged to work closely with members of the graduate faculty. The curriculum varies from year to year and includes courses in genres, periods, specific authors, critical theory, rhetoric/composition, interdisciplinary study, creative writing, cinema/film theory, linguistics, and research methods. Faculty in the Department also work in interdisciplinary areas such as American Studies, Peace Studies, Composition Studies, American Indian Studies, and Women Studies. The Department works closely with the University’s College of Education and Human Development in the area of English Education. In all areas of work, students are encouraged to utilize a variety of critical and theoretical approaches.

The Department sponsors an annual week-long writers conference that gives graduate students a chance to hear contemporary writers read their work and discuss the writing process. Visitors have included Salman Rushdie, Czeslaw Milosz, Louise Erdrich, Larry McMurtry, Leslie Silko, James Welch, August Wilson, Luisa Valenzuela, Peter Matthiessen, Tim O’Brien, Ursula Hegi, Barry Lopez and Mary Gaitskill.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

Through the work of research, service, and teaching, The Department of English is committed to the premise that language and literature reflect and shape the world in which we live. Faculty members conduct ongoing research in an array of sub-fields and interdisciplinary contexts and contribute to academic conversations occurring among humanities scholars on national and international levels. The nationally renowned Writers Conference brings great authors and opportunities for literary discussion to the larger community. Teaching at a wide range of levels, from first-year writers to Ph.D. students, the Department demonstrates the pleasures and value of a liberal arts education by emphasizing critical and creative thinking, by helping students think thoughtfully about cultural diversity, and by teaching strong written communication skills. In the Department of English, students at all levels of the curriculum are prepared for lives of public citizenship as they learn to analyze texts within complex cultural situations, to write and to think rhetorically, and to engage with diverse perspectives.

The Master of Arts in English stresses the acquisition of a broad foundation of discipline-specific knowledge and critical tools. To this end, the Department provides quality graduate instruction in literature in English, literary criticism and theory, the English language, composition and rhetoric studies, creative writing, cultural studies, and related fields. Successful M.A. students will be prepared, on the one hand, to pursue further graduate education in English, Law, or any other field that requires highly developed verbal, analytical, and rhetorical skills, and, on the other hand, to seek careers as writing teachers, creative writers, editors, or in a variety of other professions.

  • Students will develop the critical skills and tools necessary to produce independent, analytical or creative work in English studies.
    • Students use analytical or creative techniques that are associated with current work in English studies.
    • Students situate their own written work within current debates in English studies.
  • Students will use techniques—creative or critical—integral to the production of writing in English studies.
    • Students use the rhetorical conventions of English studies.
    • Students use revision to develop and refine their writing projects.
  • Graduate Teaching Assistants will demonstrate the ability to teach college-level writing effectively.
    • Students develop a range of teaching strategies.
    • Students recognize the connections between particular teaching strategies and larger learning objectives.
    • Students situate their own teaching practices in the context of significant pedagogical debates.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

Through the work of research, service, and teaching, the Department of English is committed to the premise that language and literature reflect and shape the world in which we live. Faculty members conduct ongoing research in an array of sub-fields and interdisciplinary contexts and contribute to academic conversations occurring among humanities scholars on national and international levels. The nationally renowned Writers Conference brings great authors and opportunities for literary discussion to the larger community. Teaching at a wide range of levels, from first-year writers to Ph.D. students, the Department demonstrates the pleasures and value of a liberal arts education by emphasizing critical and creative thinking, by helping students think thoughtfully about cultural diversity, and by teaching strong written communication skills. In the Department of English, students at all levels of the curriculum are prepared for lives of public citizenship as they learn to analyze texts within complex cultural situations, to write and to think rhetorically, and to engage with diverse perspectives.

The Doctor of Philosophy in English stresses the acquisition not only of a broad foundation of discipline-specific knowledge and critical tools, but also the depth of knowledge necessary to build fluency and expertise within an area of specialization. To this end, the Department provides quality graduate instruction in literature in English, literary criticism and theory, the English language, composition and rhetoric studies, creative writing, cultural studies, and related fields. Successful Ph.D. students will be prepared to seek careers as college and university faculty, writing teachers, creative writers, editors, or in a variety of other professions that require highly developed verbal, analytical, and rhetorical skills.

  • Students will produce significant, independent work in English studies and/or creative writing.
    • Students develop a specialization through which they position themselves as members of a disciplinary community.
    • Students produce work that contributes to debates in English studies and/or demonstrate connections between creative work and literary traditions.
    • Students demonstrate advanced writing and analytical skills to meet a variety of rhetorical goals.
  • Students will demonstrate both breadth and depth of knowledge about disciplinary subfields, major works, and influential critical approaches in English studies.
    • Students demonstrate an awareness of significant issues in selected disciplinary subfields.
    • Students demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and social contexts in which literary works are produced.
    • Students demonstrate an understanding of the critical tools and strategies that shape the reception of literary works and the production of English studies as a discipline.
  • Graduate Teaching Assistants will be prepared to teach effectively a range of courses in the field of English studies.
    • Students use a variety of teaching strategies.
    • Students recognize and evaluate the connections between particular teaching strategies and larger learning objectives.
    • Students situate and evaluate their own teaching practices within the context of significant pedagogical debates.

 

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

Applications for admission must be completed by February 1 for full consideration and Teaching Assistantships. The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university.
  2. Twenty semester credits of English beyond the communication requirement with a 3.00 grade point average or better.
  3. A writing sample of 10-15 pages on topics or in modes appropriate to the proposed program of study (submitted directly to the department). Applicants who plan to major in creative writing should also submit an analytical paper.
  4. Graduate Record Examination General Test required. Literature in English Advanced Test is recommended.
  5. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Arts degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the English Language and Literature Department.

Thesis Option

  1. A minimum of thirty credit hours are needed for the M.A., including the required courses listed below, the thesis (4 credits), and any Readings/Research courses (maximum 4 credits).
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  4. ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies; ENGL 501 Teaching College English and ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory (for Graduate Teaching Assistants only); and either ENGL 510 History of Literary Criticism or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism. Courses must be completed with grades of A or B (S for ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory).
  5. Up to 4 credits of Readings and Research courses (ENGL 590 Readings and ENGL 593 Research) may be used to supplement the standard graduate offerings.
  6. Evidence of the mastery of scholarly tools appropriate to the proposed field of studies is required, including proficiency in one language other than English.
  7. Four credits are allowed for the thesis.
  8. Required courses:
  9. ENGL 500Introduction to Graduate Studies2
    ENGL 501Teaching College English3
    ENGL 501LTeaching College English Laboratory1
    ENGL 510History of Literary Criticism3
    or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism
    Electives14-17
    ENGL 998Thesis4
    Total Credits27-30

Non-Thesis Option

  1. A minimum of thirty-two credit hours are needed for the M.A., including the required courses listed below, ENGL 598 Portfolio Workshop and ENGL 995 Scholarly Project, and any Readings/Research courses (maximum 4 credits).
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  4. ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies; ENGL 501 Teaching College English and ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory (for Graduate Teaching Assistants only); and either ENGL 510 History of Literary Criticism or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism. Courses must be completed with grades of A or B (S for ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory).
  5. Up to 4 credits of Readings and Research courses (ENGL 590 Readings and ENGL 593 Research) may be used to supplement the standard graduate offerings.
  6. Evidence of the mastery of scholarly tools appropriate to the proposed field of studies is required, including proficiency in one language other than English.
  7. The Critical Introductory Statement to the Portfolio will serve as the written comprehensive exam.
  8. Required courses:
  9. ENGL 500Introduction to Graduate Studies2
    ENGL 501Teaching College English3
    ENGL 501LTeaching College English Laboratory1
    ENGL 510History of Literary Criticism3
    or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism
    ENGL 598Portfolio Workshop3
    Electives15-18
    ENGL 995Scholarly Project2
    Total Credits29-32

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university.
  2. Twenty semester credits of English beyond the communication requirement with a 3.00 grade point average or better.
  3. Undergraduate work in at least one language other than English equivalent to the first two college-level years or by demonstrating (by Educational Testing Service or by Languages Department examination) a reading knowledge of one language other than English or the satisfactory completion of two semesters each of two languages other than English. In some cases, students may be admitted without the language requirement and may complete it as part of the MA. program.
  4. A writing sample of 10-15 pages on topics or in modes appropriate to the proposed program of study (submitted directly to the department). Applicants who plan to major in creative writing should also submit an analytical paper.
  5. Graduate Record Examination General Test required. Literature in English Advanced Test is recommended.
  6. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  7. A master’s degree of at least 30 semester credits of courses in literature and English language or in an acceptable combination of these and related subjects. (Graduate courses taken elsewhere may, at the discretion of the Department, be accepted in lieu of courses that would otherwise be related at the University of North Dakota.)

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the English Language and Literature Department.

  1. ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies; ENGL 501 Teaching College English and ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory (for Graduate Teaching Assistants only); and either ENGL 510 History of Literary Criticism or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism. Courses must be completed with grades of A or B (S for ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory).
  2. Up to ten credits in addition to the four credits allowed for the M.A. may be in Readings and Research courses
  3. ENGL 590Readings1-4
    ENGL 591Readings for Ph.D. Comprehensive Examinations1-4
    ENGL 593Research1-4
  4. Evidence of the mastery of scholarly tools appropriate to the proposed field of studies is required, including proficiency in one language other than English plus either another language or languages.
  5. Completion of the comprehensive examinations, in areas or topics relevant to a student’s individual interests as recommended by the student’s Advisory Committee. These will include three written comprehensive exams: 1) a written major field exam; 2) a written second field exam; and 3) a written special topic exam. The major and second field exams provide the kind of breadth of knowledge that goes beyond that developed through graduate coursework alone while the special topic exam is designed to begin the thought process necessary to conceptualizing and completing the dissertation. A fourth exam, an oral exam on the dissertation prospectus, is scheduled and completed within six months after completion of the written exams.
  6. Fifteen (15) hours of credit may be granted for the dissertation, which may take the form of either a closely focused scholarly-critical investigation of a single topic, a creative work or group of works, or a number of related, publishable essays (critical, scholarly, bibliographical, methodological, pedagogical) which may be developed in combination with a project or projects deemed appropriate and acceptable by the student’s Advisory Committee.

NOTE: Students may be recommended for advancement to candidacy for the doctoral degree only after they have satisfied the following requirements in addition to those required by the School of Graduate Studies: Completion of ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies and either ENGL 510 History of Literary Criticism or ENGL 511 Problems in Literary Criticism with grades of A or B; for Graduate Teaching Assistants, ENGL 501 Teaching College English with a grade of A or B and ENGL 501L Teaching College English Laboratory with a grade of S.

Courses

ENGL 500. Introduction to Graduate Studies. 2 Credits.

Required of all candidates for advanced degrees in English. An introduction to graduate study and the profession.

ENGL 501. Teaching College English. 3 Credits.

An introduction to theories and methods of teaching college English. Required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in English.

ENGL 501L. Teaching College English Laboratory. 1 Credit.

The practicum part of English 501. Required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in English.

ENGL 510. History of Literary Criticism. 3 Credits.

A history of European criticism from the Classical Greek period to the present day, with emphasis on major texts.

ENGL 511. Problems in Literary Criticism. 3 Credits.

A course in applied criticism. Repeatable when topics vary.

ENGL 516. Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

Allows students to receive graduate-level instruction in a workshop setting, meeting regularly with other students, sharing their work, and critiquing one another's work. The purpose of this course is to enable the student to produce fiction of professional quality, such as that needed for a graduate thesis in creative writing. Repeatable to a total of 6 credits for M.A. students, 9 credits for Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: Upper-division undergraduate work in creative writing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 517. Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course allows students to receive graduate-level instruction in a workshop setting, meeting regularly with other students, sharing their work, and critiquing one another's work. The purpose of this course is to enable the student to produce poetry of professional quality, such as that needed for a graduate thesis in creative writing. Repeatable to a total of 6 credits for M.A. students, 9 credits for Ph.D. students. Prerequisites: ENGL 413 and 414, upper-division undergraduate work in creative writing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 520. Studies in English Literature. 1-3 Credits.

The subject of study will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit when the subject of study differs.

ENGL 521. Studies in American Literature. 1-3 Credits.

The subject of study will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit when the subject of study differs.

ENGL 522. Studies in English Language. 1-3 Credits.

The subject of study will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit when the subject of study differs.

ENGL 524. Studies in Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

Topics vary, such as advanced workshops in different genres and "reading for writers," studying the works of published writers as models for students' own creative work. Prerequisites: ENGL 516 or ENGL 517, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 525. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

This course investigates selected topics in composition and rhetorical studies. The subject of study will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit when the subject of study differs.

ENGL 531. Seminar in English Literature. 3 Credits.

This class requires the preparation and delivery of a long research paper on an appropriate topic. Repeatable.

ENGL 532. Seminar in American Literature. 3 Credits.

Similar in method to English 531. Repeatable.

ENGL 533. Seminar in English Language. 3 Credits.

Similar in method to English 531. Repeatable.

ENGL 590. Readings. 1-4 Credits.

American Literature; Cinema; English Literature; English Language; or Creative Writing. Supervised independent study. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 500 and department consent.

ENGL 591. Readings for Ph.D. Comprehensive Examinations. 1-4 Credits.

Supervised independent study on approved topics. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. This course is exempt from the normal "Incomplete" reversion schedule. A grade is assigned upon completion of the appropriate comprehensive examination. Prerequisites: Department consent.

ENGL 593. Research. 1-4 Credits.

American Literature; Cinema; English Literature; English Language; or Creative Writing. Independent study of a problem in the field resulting in a long research paper or a series of short reports. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 500 and department consent.

ENGL 598. Portfolio Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to further explore the rhetorical strategies of academic writing in the discipline of English and to support students through the development of the Portfolio thesis. Permission of Director of Graduate Studies is required. Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Director.

ENGL 599. Special Topic. 1-3 Credits.

A course on varying topics. F,S.

ENGL 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

As a common course number uniform throughout the graduate school, English 995 Scholarly Project will serve the purpose described in the graduate catalog as a required component of the non-thesis option in fulfillment of the M.A. degree. F,S,SS.

ENGL 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

ENGL 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

ENGL 998. Thesis. 1-4 Credits.

ENGL 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

ENGL 401. Studies in Medieval Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in the literature of England in the medieval period. Repeatable when topics vary. F, even years.

ENGL 403. Studies in Colonial American Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in the literature of America in the colonial period. Repeatable when topics vary. F, even years.

ENGL 404. Studies in Renaissance Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in the literature of the English Renaissance. Repeatable when topics vary. S, odd years.

ENGL 405. Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in the English literature of the Restoration and 18th century. Repeatable when topics vary. S, even years.

ENGL 406. Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in literature in English of the 19th Century. Repeatable when topics vary. F,S.

ENGL 407. Studies in Twentieth Century Literature. 3 Credits.

A course in literature in English of the 20th Century. Repeatable when topics vary. F,S.

ENGL 408. Advanced Composition. 3 Credits.

Intensive work in advanced writing in English Studies or other professional fields. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or ENGL 125 or ENGL 130. S.

ENGL 409. Art of the Cinematic Drama. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the aesthetics of the film drama with a concentration on the theory and evaluation of the medium. This course examines the relationship of the verbal and visual arts. Repeatable when topics vary. Prerequisite: ENGL 225. S.

ENGL 413. The Art of Writing: Poetry. 3 Credits.

Intermediate and advanced-level study and practice of poetry-writing. Repeatable once. Prerequisite: ENGL 226 or instructor's permission. F.

ENGL 414. The Art of Writing: Fiction. 3 Credits.

Continues the work of ENGL 306, Creative Writing: Fiction, at the advanced level. Prerequisite: ENGL 306 or instructor's permission. S.

ENGL 415. Seminar in Literature. 1-4 Credits.

A course for advanced students on topics varying from year to year. Repeatable. S.

ENGL 417. Special Topics in Language. 1-4 Credits.

A course for advanced students on topics varying from year to year. Repeatable. F.

ENGL 418. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on recent second language acquisition (SLA) research findings from the areas of linguistics, psychology, education, and communication and on how to relate these findings to language learning and teaching. Prerequisite: ENGL 209. S.

ENGL 419. Teaching English as a Second Language. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the principles of teaching English as a second language, with special attention to tutoring. Prerequisite: ENGL 209. F.

ENGL 442. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

The development of the language from the earliest times to the present. This course is recommended for all prospective English teachers. S.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382