2016-2017 Catalog

Mechanical Engineering

http://www.me.und.edu

Faculty: Ames, Bandyopadhyay, Bibel, Cavalli, Grewal, Gupta, Neubert (Graduate Director), Semke, Tang, Yang and Zahui

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Engineering (M.Engr.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (M.S.),  the Master of Engineering (M.Engr.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. The M.S. degree is a research-oriented degree that is available in either thesis or non-thesis options. The non-thesis M.S. degree requires completion of an independent study. The M. Engr. degree is an engineering practice-oriented degree that requires completion of an engineering design project.

The Department offers combined B.S./Master’s programs that allow a student to complete a master’s degree in as little as one year beyond the bachelor’s degree. The master’s degree may be either an M.S. or M. Engr. See “Combined Degree Program” under the College of Engineering and Mines section for additional details.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degrees section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

Thesis Option

The mission of the Master of Science (Thesis) in Mechanical Engineering program is to prepare mechanical engineers for either technical careers in government or industry or for doctoral studies in mechanical engineering or related fields. This preparation will include guided, independent research and advanced coursework in mechanical engineering and related areas. Both the research and the coursework will be selected as appropriate in specific areas of interest to the student and their graduate committee and for which the faculty is qualified to direct and instruct.

Non-Thesis Option

The mission of the Master of Science (Non-Thesis) in Mechanical Engineering program is to prepare mechanical engineers for technical careers in government or industry in mechanical engineering or related fields. This preparation will include guided, independent research and advanced coursework in mechanical engineering and related areas. Both the research and the coursework will be selected as appropriate in specific areas of interest to the student and their graduate advisor and for which the faculty is qualified to direct and instruct.

Student Learning Goals

Thesis Option

Goal 1: Graduates will demonstrate a mastery of scientific research by formulating, assessing, and documenting a scientific hypothesis.

Goal 2: Graduates will be well prepared for a career in government/industry and/or doctoral studies in mechanical engineering or a related field.

Non-Thesis Option

Goal 1: Graduates will demonstrate a mastery of scientific investigation by researching and preparing a scholarly report on a topic related to mechanical engineering.

Goal 2: Graduates will be well prepared for a career in government/industry in mechanical engineering or a related field.

Master of Engineering (M.Engr.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering program is to provide advanced preparation in the practice of mechanical engineering for mechanical engineers seeking technical careers in industry. This preparation will include a guided, independent design project and advanced coursework in mechanical engineering and related areas. Both the design project and the coursework will be selected as appropriate in specific areas of interest to the student and graduate advisor and for which the faculty is qualified to direct and instruct.

Goal 1: Graduates will demonstrate a mastery of the practical implementation of engineering concepts by identifying a substantial need, formulating a design or process to meet the need and implementing their solution to meet that need.

Goal 2: Graduates will be well prepared for a career in industry in mechanical engineering or a related field.

Combined Degree

To encourage undergraduate engineering students to extend their studies to include a graduate degree, the School of Engineering and Mines has a combined program that permits students to earn both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in an engineering discipline. This program allows students to designate two three-credit graduate courses to count for both degrees. The selected courses must have graduate course standing and be designated when a student requests admission to the program.

Students can complete additional courses for graduate-only credit prior to completion of the BSME if their schedule allows.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The program recognizes that effective researchers should have extensive expertise in a specialization (track) coupled with a familiarity and awareness of related research needs and the context for applying that expertise. Students enrolled in the Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. program will develop a broad and inclusive background in the chosen track while also working with faculty from related disciplines to create the interdisciplinary and integrative research paradigms necessary for comprehensive research. A principal goal of the program is to produce Ph.D. research engineers for careers that focus on the invention and development of new technologies and advances for the 21st Century and beyond. Activities to develop professional and personal skills are intended through a multidisciplinary emphasis to enable participants to:

  1. understand the ethical, political, and economic impacts of their research developments and policies; and
  2. improve their ability to communicate about complex technical subjects in both professional and general settings

Goal 1: Graduates will have a depth of knowledge in geological engineering accompanied by a breadth of knowledge in related areas to achieve their specific goals and objectives.

Goal 2: Graduates will be proficient researchers, i.e. they will have the skills required to formulate, assess and document a hypothesis.

Goal 3: Graduates will be well prepared for advanced professional practice, for teaching, and for careers in research and creative activity in engineering or a related field.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies' current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from an ABET accredited program and have an acceptable GPA.
  2. GRE general test required for applicants with undergraduate degrees from other than ABET accredited programs.
  3. 2.75 overall undergraduate GPA or a GPA of at least 3.00 for the junior and senior years.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies' English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  5. Students seeking admission to a combined B.S./Master’s program must have a GPA of at least 3.0 at the time of admission.

Students who hold an undergraduate engineering or science degree other than mechanical engineering may be admitted to provisional or qualified status with an obligation to acquire additional background in mechanical engineering as appropriate.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Science degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies' as well as particular requirements set forth by the Mechanical Engineering Department.

Thesis Option

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field approved by the graduate committee, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  4. Completion of a research project and its presentation in a thesis (4-9 credits for ME 998 Thesis).

Non-Thesis Option

  1. Thirty-two (32) credits including credits approved by the graduate advisor required for the major.
  2. Two credits of ME 997 Independent Study.
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  4. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Preparation of a written independent study approved by the faculty advisor.
  6. Comprehensive final examination.

The research project, independent study, or design project may be from interdisciplinary areas such as bioengineering or environmental engineering, or they may be topics in design, manufacturing processes, vibrations, stress analysis, materials, power, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, or combustion.

Master of Engineering (M.Engr.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies' current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from an ABET accredited program and have an acceptable GPA
  2. GRE general test required for those applicants with undergraduate degrees from other than ABET accredited programs.
  3. 2.50 overall undergraduate GPA or a GPA of at least 2.75 for the junior and senior years of their undergraduate programs.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies' English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  5. Students seeking admission to a combined B.S./Master’s program must have a GPA of at least 3.0 at the time of admission.

Students who hold an undergraduate engineering or science degree other than mechanical engineering may be admitted to provisional or qualified status with an obligation to acquire additional background in mechanical engineering as appropriate.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Engineering degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies' as well as particular requirements set forth by the Mechanical Engineering Department.

  1. 30 credits approved by the graduate advisor.
  2. 15 credits at the 500 level or above.
  3. 9 credits of engineering science, basic science, and/or mathematics.
  4. ME 595 Design Projects for 9 credits.
  5. A written report on the design project.
  6. All major department courses must be at the 400 level or above, and no courses below 300 level may be included in the program.
  7. Comprehensive final examination.

The research project, independent study, or design project may be from interdisciplinary areas such as bioengineering or environmental engineering, or they may be topics in design, manufacturing processes, vibrations, stress analysis, materials, power, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, or combustion.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

  1. A baccalaureate degree in an engineering discipline with a GPA of 3.3 or higher or a Master of Science degree in an engineering discipline with a GPA of 3.0.
  2. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the Graduate Catalog.
  3. In addition to meeting the general provisions in the UND graduate catalog and the minimum requirements in items 1-2 above, candidates are assessed using a holistic process that considers Student’s Record of Publications, GRE test scores (for students who are applying with a B.S. engineering degree from an non-ABET accredited program), transcripts of previous college work, relevant research and work experience, letters of recommendation, research interests, and English language skills. Students must specify a track on their admission form to facilitate this evaluation.
  4. A student holding a non-engineering degree or who does not meet the minimum requirements in items 1-2 above may apply to one of the Master of Science degree programs in the College of Engineering and Mines. Students successfully completing a UND M.S. engineering degree will be considered to satisfy the requirements of items 1-2 above; however, these students shall still be subject to the holistic evaluation process described in item 3 with the exception that new GRE test scores will not be required.
  5. Students admitted to an engineering M.S.M.E. program but meeting the minimum requirements in items 1-2 above, may after one calendar year and upon the recommendation of his/her advisory committee, request to by-pass the master’s degree and work directly toward the Ph.D. degree. The recommendation of the advisory committee shall be brought to a vote by the program graduate committee relevant to the degree track requested by the student. A minimum of one week before such a meeting, the program graduate committee shall be notified and provided with the student’s updated file which shall consist of the materials used for application into the M.S.M.E. program, a transcript of all academic work completed at UND, and any additional materials the student wishes to have considered. If the recommendation is approved by the relevant graduate committee, the student will be given the qualifying exam. Passing this exam will advance the student to Approved Status in the Doctoral Program in Mechanical Engineering.

Residence Requirements

The purpose of residence requirements is to provide an opportunity for a sustained and concentrated intellectual effort, to provide for immersion in an academic research environment, and to permit extensive interaction with fellow students and faculty of the Mechanical Engineering Department. Within the first two years of graduate work at UND, at least two consecutive semesters must be completed in residence. During residency, a student must be registered for at least nine credits in a semester, or be a graduate research or teaching assistant taking the appropriate credits to qualify as a full-time student. The remainder of the credits required for a degree can be completed in a manner to accommodate the student’s fiscal, family, job-related, and other constraints with the consent of the student’s adviser. The program of study must be completed within the seven-year period normally allowed for graduate programs.

Under special circumstances, the student in conjunction with his/her advisory committee and the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Committee, can petition the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies for variances in this policy.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Mechanical Engineering Doctoral Program.

The following requirements are in addition to the UND School of Graduate Studies general requirements for the Ph.D.:

1. Completion of 90 semester credits beyond the baccalaureate degree.

2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.

3. Scholarly Tools: Proficiency in mathematics demonstrated by completing nine approved credits of mathematics intensive coursework (equivalent to UND 400-level or higher courses) with a grade of B or better which must include at least one course in numerical analysis. Scholarly tools courses taken for graduate credit after a student has enrolled in a graduate program at UND may be counted to fulfill requirements listed in Item 5 below.

4. A maximum of 30 credit hours can be transferred from a master’s program.

5. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be doctoral research and dissertation.

6. Exactly 3 credit hours of the ME 562 – Graduate Seminar must be taken.

7. A minimum of 39 credit hours of coursework are required (up to 21 credit hours of coursework may be transferred from a master’s program in fulfilling this requirement subject to the credit transfer limits described in the general section of this graduate catalog). The coursework shall include a minimum of 27 credit hours of Mechanical Engineering (or relevance courses with the consent of the student’s advisor and advisory committee) coursework selected from the approved list of ME Ph.D. courses published in the UND Academic Catalog. Equivalent graduate level coursework may be transferred from a master’s program.

8. Successful completion of 4 written qualifying examinations, taken no later than the end of their second year of residence.  One of the exam topics must be applied mathematics.  The other examination topics must be selected from the following list:

  • Thermodynamics
  • Solid Mechanics                     
  • Controls
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Dynamics
  • Heat Transfer
  • Materials Science
  • Manufacturing
  • Robotics

             Topics for the examinations should be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. 

Qualifying examinations will be offered once per year during the fifth week of the spring semester.  Students must notify the ME Graduate Director no later than the end of the second week of the spring semester of 1) their intention to take the exams, 2) their selected exam topics.  No student will be required to complete more than two exams per day.  Each exam will be two hours in length.  No later than the 10th week of each fall semester, faculty that will be administering spring exams will determine what, if any, reference materials students will be allowed to use during their exam.  A list of potential exam administrators will be available from the ME Graduate Director.  Students should consult individual faculty as the allowable materials may vary from exam to exam.

Students will be awarded a grade of pass (score of 80% or higher on all exams), conditional pass (80% or higher on three exams), or fail.  Students achieving a grade of conditional pass may be required to retake the exam on which they scored <80%, enroll in specific courses, or complete other remedial actions at the discretion of the examining faculty and the student’s PhD committee.  Students failing (<80%) two or three exams will be required to retake all four exams.  Examination retakes must occur during the next regular qualifying examination period.  Students failing all four exams will be removed from the PhD program at the end of the semester in which the exams were taken.  Students failing an exam area more than once will be removed from the PhD program at the end of the semester in which the exam was retaken.  A direct admit student who fails an exam a second time may request to be reclassified as a Master’s student at the discretion of the student’s advisor and the ME Graduate Director.

9. After successful completion of the qualifying examinations, an annual oral progress report should be presented to the advisory committee. A part of these presentations will include details on the dissertation research progress and plan.  ME 562 – Graduate Seminar may serve as the venue for the annual oral progress reporting.

10. PhD students will complete a preliminary examination one year prior to their planned graduation date.  The examination will consist of an oral presentation to their thesis committee of their progress to date and expected work to complete their degree.  The committee will assess the presentation, progress and plan on a pass/fail basis.  The preliminary examination must be passed prior to graduation.  A student who fails the process more than once will be removed from the PhD program.

11. A candidate for the degree must complete the original basic research investigation as documented in the research proposal. Each candidate will complete the research investigation to the satisfaction of the research advisor and the advisory committee and will prepare a written dissertation covering the research. The project must represent an original and independent investigation by the student. It is expected that the results of the research will be submitted for publication in refereed research journals. The candidate will submit the dissertation to the examining committee at least four weeks prior to defense date. The examining committee consists the PhD committee and an external examiner from outside the University. The external examiner is selected by the department’s graduate committee from a list of three candidates proposed by the advisor. The external examiner should not have any common publication with the student’s advisor or student and can be from academia or industry with an expertise relevant to the student’s research. The student and advisor should not contact the external examiner directly before or after.

12. The candidate must present and successfully defend the dissertation at the final examination (see School of Graduate Studies requirements). Four results of the examination can be obtained: 1) pass; 2) minor revision 3) major revision and 4) fail. For minor revisions there is no need for another defense session and upon revising the dissertation the examining committee can pass the student. For major revisions the student is asked to fundamentally revise the methodologies and schedule another defense session. If failed, the student will not be able to obtain a PhD degree and may request to be reclassified as a master’s student and complete a Master of Science degree.

13. At least one peer reviewed journal article (as the first author) and one conference paper (as the first author) must be submitted with the consent of the advisor prior to graduation.

Courses

ME 523. Advanced Machine Design. 3 Credits.

Advanced design and analysis of machine components; kinematic synthesis and analysis of mechanisms, force analysis, rotor dynamics, gyrodynamics, stresses in thick cylinders and flywheels, lubrication, statistical considerations, energy methods, curved beams. Prerequisites: ME 322 and ME 323.

ME 524. Deformation and Fracture. 3 Credits.

Aspects of elasticity theory, continuum mechanics and fracture mechanics. Fundamental relationships between material structure and engineering properties. Principles and properties of composite materials. Prerequisite: ME 301 or consent of instructor.

ME 525. Metal Fatigue in Engineering. 3 Credits.

Metal fatigue in engineering, involving design, development, and failure analysis of components, structures, machines, and vehicles subjected to repeated loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 203 and ME 301, or consent of instructor.

ME 526. Advanced Vibrations. 3 Credits.

Advanced vibration theory including the solutions of multi-degree of freedom coupled systems, continuous systems, energy methods, and non-linear vibrations. Prerequisite: ME 426.

ME 529. Advanced Finite Element Methods. 3 Credits.

Computer-aided techniques for finite element analysis of engineering systems. Topics include solution algorithm for nonlinear methods, large deflection, inelastic and contact analysis, and analysis of vibrating systems. Prerequisite: ME 429 or consent of instructor.

ME 532. Advanced Dynamics. 3 Credits.

Kinematics and kinetics of plane and three-dimensional motion, vector mechanics, general methods of linear and angular momentum, generalized coordinates, and variational methods including Hamilton's and Lagrange's equations. Prerequisites: ENGR 202 and MATH 266.

ME 542. Thermodynamics of Materials. 3 Credits.

Foundations of materials behavior in terms of energy and statistics. Topics will include entropy, free energy, phase equilibrium, ideal versus real solutions and diffusion. Prerequisites: ME 301 and ME 341, or consent of instructor.

ME 545. Fluidized-Bed Combustion Engineering. 3 Credits.

Fluidized-bed hydrodynamics and heat transfer. Design of fluidized-bed coal combustors. Combustion models and their significance. Prerequisite: ME 306 and ME 474, or consent of instructor.

ME 566. Introduction to Machine Vision. 3 Credits.

An introduction to machine vision providing students with a general understanding of the imaging process, feature extraction and matching, object detection and tracking, model fitting, and camera pose estimation. Prerequisites: ME 322, ENGR 200, and MATH 266. F, even years.

ME 574. Advanced Heat Transfer. 3 Credits.

Advanced conduction in isotropic media in two and three dimensions steady and unsteady problems. Advanced convection including solution of Prandtl Boundary layer equations. Numerical methods, Fourier series, Bessel functions, LaPlace transforms, and error functions. Radioactive heat transfer. Prerequisite: ME 474 or consent of instructor.

ME 575. Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of conduction and radiation heat transfer. Solution methodologies to classical heat conduction problems will be introduced. Topics include: multidimensional steady conduction via separation of variables and principle of superposition; transient conduction with time-dependent boundary conditions via method of complex temperatures; numerical solutions to heat conduction problems; spectral dependence of radiation; blackbody and gray surface radiation; radiation exchange between surfaces; radiation shield. Prerequisite: ME 474 or consent of instructor.

ME 576. Convective Heat Transfer. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of convective heat transfer, involving developing an understanding of boundary layers, flow in pipes, and convective heat transfer processes. Topics include the concepts of boundary layers, laminar and turbulent flow on surfaces and inside of pipes, and turbulence models. Analytical tools introduced are useful for estimating or bounding heat transfer rates when correlations are not available. Prerequisite: ME 474.

ME 580. Introduction to Autonomous Robotics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to autonomous mobile robots including hardware, modeling, sensors, and basic localization and mapping techniques. Prerequisites: ME 322, ENGR 200, and MATH 266. F, odd years.

ME 590. Special Topics. 1-6 Credits.

Investigation of special topics dictated by student and faculty interests. May be repeated up to a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Repeatable to 6 credits.

ME 591. Research in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 Credits.

Independent graduate research in Mechanical Engineering. Repeatable to 6 credits. Repeatable to 6 credits.

ME 595. Design Projects. 3-6 Credits.

A three to six credit course of engineering design experience involving individual effort and formal written report. Prerequisites: Restricted to Master of Engineering students and subject to approval by the student's advisor.

ME 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

ME 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

ME 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Development and documentation of scholarly activity demonstrating proficiency in Mechanical Engineering at the master's level. Repeatable to 9 credits. Repeatable to 9 credits.

ME 999. PhD Student Doctoral Dissertation. 1-18 Credits.

PhD student doctoral dissertation. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Mechanical Engineering Program and consent of the instructor. Repeatable to 18 credits. S/U grading. F,S,SS.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

ME 420. Composite Materials. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ME 301 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 426. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 Credits.

Vibration analysis and design as it applies to single and multi degree freedom mechanical systems, isolation and absorption of vibration, vibration of continuous systems, numerical methods of solution. Prerequisites: ENGR 202 with a grade of C or better, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. S.

ME 428. Advanced Manufacturing Processes. 3 Credits.

Individual projects involving the manufacturing economics and flow charts for selected products and basic technical principles of manufacturing processes. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: ME 418 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 429. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. 3 Credits.

Finite element analysis is introduced as a design tool. Emphasis is given to modeling techniques and element types. Matrix methods are used throughout the class. Prerequisites: ENGR 203 with a grade of C and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 439. Introduction to Robotics. 3 Credits.

A systems engineering approach to robotics. Presents an introduction to manipulators, sensors, actuators, and end effectors for automation. Topics covered include kinematics, dynamics, control, programming of manipulators, pattern recognition, and computer vision. Prerequisites: ENGR 200 with a grade of C or better, MATH 166 with a grade of C or better, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 446. Gas Turbines. 3 Credits.

General principles, thermodynamics, and performance of gas turbine engines. Design consideration of engine components. Prerequisites: ME 341 with a grade of C or better and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 449. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of spark ignition and compression ignition engines, related components and processes. Prerequisites: ME 342 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 451. Heating and Air Conditioning. 3 Credits.

Psychometrics, heating and cooling loads and analysis of air conditioning systems. Prerequisites: ME 342 and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ME 474. On demand.

ME 464. Computational Fluid Dynamics. 3 Credits.

Provides a practical experience using computational fluid dynamics and provides supporting material in fluid dynamics, which is useful in understanding the need to resolve grids in boundary layers and other regions of high velocity gradients. The course is structured as half lecture and half laboratory. The lecture covers topics related to laminar and turbulence boundary layers with and without acceleration, turbulence modeling, wakes and jets. The laboratory provides experience in building grids using the program GAMBIT, the solid/fluid modeling and meshing program, and calculating solutions using FLUENT, a commercial flow solver. Prerequisites: ME 306, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 476. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Differential forms of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum for viscous fluid flow. Boundary layer theory and its applications. Principles of one-dimensional compressible flow. Prerequisites: ME 306, MATH 266, and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. On demand.

ME 477. Compressible Fluid Flow. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory and application of one-dimensional compressible flow. Course topics include isentropic flow in converging and converging/diverging nozzles, normal shock waves, oblique shock waves, Prandtl-Meyer flow, flow with friction and heat addition. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. Prerequisites or Corequisites: ME 341 with a grade of C or better and ME 306. On demand.

ME 490. Special Laboratory Problems. 1-3 Credits.

Laboratory investigations of interest to students and faculty. Repeatable to maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and admission to the professional Mechanical Engineering program. Repeatable to 6 credits. On demand.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382