2014-2015 Catalog

Physics and Astrophysics

http://www.physics.und.edu

FACULTY: Barkhouse, Dewar, Kim (Chair), Lee, Marasinghe (Graduate Director), Oncel, Schwalm, Tung and Young

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of Physics and Astrophysics offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Current research in the department emphasizes solid-state physics, materials science, astrophysics, and health physics. Departmental facilities permit both theoretical and experimental research investigations.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The primary functions of the Physics and Astrophysics Department are teaching, research and service. In accordance with the mission of the University, the department provides courses for physics majors and minors, and service courses to students in other programs in the College of Arts & Sciences and other units of the University.

Goal 1: Students will acquire competency in graduate level physics including mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, and theoretical methods.

Goal 2: Students will acquire in-depth exposure to research.

Goal 3: Students will acquire skills in oral presentations and acquire experience in writing research papers.

Goal 4: Students will develop analytical skills needed as a professional physicist.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Student Learning Goals

Goal 1: Students will acquire competency in graduate level physics including mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, statistical physics, and theoretical methods.

Goal 2: Students will acquire skills to carry out programs of independent research at a research laboratory or as a university faculty member.

Goal 3: Students will acquire skills in oral presentations and acquire experience in writing research papers.

Goal 4: Students will develop analytical skills needed as a professional physicist.

 

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission rquirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university.
  2. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work (2.5 for M. Engr.) or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior year of undergraduate work (based on a 4.0 scale).
  3. Completed a minimum of 21 semester credits of undergraduate physics, plus mathematics through differential equations or the equivalent.
  4. Coursework should include intermediate courses in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics, thermal physics, and modern quantum physics. Adequate preparation in general chemistry is also necessary.
  5. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  6. An applicant without satisfactory undergraduate training may be admitted to the program, but will be required to remove deficiencies by completing the necessary undergraduate courses without receiving graduate credit for them.
  7. Ph.D. applicants are encouraged to submit the Graduate Record Examination scores for the general test and advanced physics test.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Science degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Physics and Astrophysics Department.

The program is designed to provide the student with basic physics courses at the graduate level and an introduction to research.

  1. Minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth (usually 8-9 semester credits) of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  4. Complete the following courses:
    PHYS 509Methods of Theoretical Physics3
    PHYS 539Quantum Mechanics3
    PHYS 541Theory Electricity Magnetism3
    PHYS 545Analytical Mechanics3
  5. Complete six additional hours from the following:
    PHYS 510Methods of Theoretical Physics3
    PHYS 540Quantum Mechanics3
    PHYS 542Theory of Electricity and Magnetism3
  6. Complete research project and PHYS 998 Thesis (4-9 credits).

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission rquirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Applicants who are seeking admission to School of Graduate Studies must meet all of the minimum general School of Graduate Studies admission requirements identified in the graduate catalog. In addition, prospective students must fulfill the requirements for admission to the graduate program in Physics and Astrophysics.

  1. Successful completion of a master’s degree (Some programs permit bypassing the master’s degree and allow for direct admission to the Ph.D. degree. Check specific department requirements for admission.)
  2. An overall GPA of 3.0 for all graduate work.
  3. Completed all undergraduate preparation.
  4. Presentation of scores on the GRE General Test and advanced physics test is recommended.
  5. Be recommended for doctoral work by the department.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Physics and Astrophysics Department.

The degree is a research degree and is conferred only in recognition of high achievement in independent scientific research and scholarship.

  1. Completion of 90 semester credits beyond the baccalaureate degree.
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate.
  3. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to one-half of the work beyond a master’s degree (maximum of 30 semester credit hours) may be transferred from another institution that offers post-master’s degrees in the discipline
  4. In addition to PHYS 590 Research, the coursework will amount to approximately 36 hours.
  5. Completion of a regular core of courses which includes:
    PHYS 509Methods of Theoretical Physics3
    PHYS 510Methods of Theoretical Physics3
    PHYS 539Quantum Mechanics3
    PHYS 540Quantum Mechanics3
    PHYS 541Theory Electricity Magnetism3
    PHYS 542Theory of Electricity and Magnetism3
    PHYS 543Statistical Physics3
    PHYS 545Analytical Mechanics3
    PHYS 549Seminar1
  6. Completion of several specialized graduate level courses in physics in order to obtain the in-depth training essential for the development of their research interest.
  7. Completion of at least nine semester hours of graduate work, (400 level or above) in a single related field.
  8. After successful completion of the first two semesters of coursework, students who entered the program with a bachelor’s degree will take a written qualifying examination, which covers undergraduate and first-year graduate level courses. Students with a master’s degree will take this examination in the second semester of enrollment.
  9. A student who fails to perform satisfactorily in this examination may be re-examined after waiting one semester. In general, no student will be allowed to take the qualifying examination more than twice.
  10. No student may proceed formally toward the Ph.D. degree until this examination has been passed.
  11. Written doctoral comprehensive examination in physics will normally be taken in the fifth semester of graduate enrollment. This must be completed before advancement to candidacy is granted.
  12. Candidates for the Ph.D. must complete a research investigation. Upon satisfactory completion of the research investigation, the student is required to prepare a dissertation covering the research.

At the final oral examination, the candidate presents and defends the dissertation.

Courses

PHYS 509. Methods of Theoretical Physics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the mathematical methods currently used in physics.

PHYS 510. Methods of Theoretical Physics. 3 Credits.

A continuation of Physics 509 introduction to the mathematical methods currently used in physics.

PHYS 511A. Physics for Teachers I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 511L.

PHYS 511B. Physics for Teachers I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 511A.

PHYS 511L. Physics for Teachers I Lab. 2 Credits.

Prerequisite: Department consent.

PHYS 512A. Physics for Teachers II. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 512L.

PHYS 512B. Physics for Teachers II. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 512A.

PHYS 512L. Physics for Teachers II Lab. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: PHYS 511L and PHYS 511B.

PHYS 513A. Physics for Teachers III. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 513L.

PHYS 513B. Physics for Teachers III. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: PHYS 513A.

PHYS 513L. Physics for Teachers III Lab. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: PHYS 512L and PHYS 512B.

PHYS 535. Solid State Physics. 3 Credits.

The crystal lattice, electron theory of metals and semiconductors, and transport phenomena in solids.

PHYS 536. Solid State Physics II. 3 Credits.

Lattice vibrations, phononelectron interactions, and cooperative phenomena in solids.

PHYS 539. Quantum Mechanics. 3 Credits.

The Schroedinger equation, perturbation methods, and simple quantum mechanical systems.

PHYS 540. Quantum Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Matrix methods, spin, and scattering phenomena.

PHYS 541. Theory Electricity Magnetism. 3 Credits.

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic waves.

PHYS 542. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 3 Credits.

Special theory of relativity, scattering of charged particles, and radiation.

PHYS 543. Statistical Physics. 3 Credits.

The Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac statistics, and their application to the description of physical systems.

PHYS 545. Analytical Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Variational methods. Lagrange's equations, oscillations, Hamilton equations, and special relativity.

PHYS 549. Seminar. 1 Credit.

PHYS 550. Special Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Investigation of special topics in advanced physics; the subject matter determined by studentfaculty interest. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

PHYS 590. Research. 1-16 Credits.

PHYS 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

PHYS 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

PHYS 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

PHYS 999. Dissertation. 1-18 Credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

PHYS 402. Computers in Physics. 3 Credits.

Computer applications in physics, that may include data analysis, numerical simulation, symbolic and algebraic programming, parallel computing, computer interfacing and/or experimental physics applications. Prerequisites: PHYS 252 and Knowledge of a higher-level computer programming language, or consent of instructor. On demand.

PHYS 428. Advanced Physics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Advanced undergraduate experiments in physics, using modern techniques and instrumentation. Classic experiments leading to the current understanding of physical theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 253 or approval of instructor. F, odd years.

PHYS 431. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to quantum mechanics with applications to atomic structure. Prerequisite: PHYS 253. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 317 or approval of department. F, odd years.

PHYS 432. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Credits.

Further development of basic quantum theory with application to atomic, molecular, solid state and nuclear physics. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 431 or consent of instructor. S, even years.

PHYS 434. Nuclear Physics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory of atomic nuclei, fundamental forces and sub-atomic particles. Prerequisite: PHYS 253 or approval of instructor. F, odd years.

PHYS 437. Introductory Solid State Physics. 3 Credits.

A general introduction to solid state phenomena. Prerequisite: PHYS 253 or approval of instructor. F, even years.

PHYS 460. Introduction to Astrophysics. 3 Credits.

Nature of stars. Topics include celestial mechanics, relativity, optics, stellar birth, stellar interiors and evolution, nucleosynthesis, stellar death, compact objects, black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs, binaries and variable stars. Some topics include the use of computer tools to solve problems. Prerequisite: PHYS 253 or approval of instructor. F, even years.

PHYS 461. Introduction to Astrophysics II. 3 Credits.

Galaxies and the universe. Topics include structure and evolution of galaxies, the Milky Way, stellar populations, globular clusters, interstellar medium, big bang, Hubble and the distance scale, radio galaxies, quasars, jets, blazars, clusters and superclusters of galaxies and cosmology. Some topics include the use of computer tools to solve problems. Prerequisite: PHYS 460 or approval of instructor. F, odd years.

PHYS 492. Special Problems. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisite: Approval of the department. F,S.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382