2014-2015 Catalog

History

http://www.und.edu/dept/histdept/

FACULTY: Berger, Broedel (Graduate Program Director), Burin, Campbell, Caraher, Iseminger, Kelsch, Mochoruk, Porter, Prescott and Reese (Chair)

Degrees Granted: Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Education (M.Ed.), Doctor of Arts (D.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of History offers programs leading to the Master of Arts degree, the Master of Education degree, the Doctor of Arts degree, and the Ph.D. degree. The M.Ed. degree is also available for students who wish to complete an education degree with an area of concentration in History. See the M.Ed. requirements in the Degree Requirements section for further information. The program advisor for the M.Ed. will be in the Department of History, but students planning to take this option should also consult an advisor in the College of Education and Human Development.

Some Teaching Assistantships, providing stipends and waivers of tuition, are available. Applications for assistantships should be submitted by March 1, but later applications will be considered. M.A. students are eligible for four semesters of assistantships and doctoral students are eligible for six semesters of assistantships.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Graduate Program of the History Department of the University of North Dakota is to provide quality graduate-level instruction in the fields of North American, European, and World History. Successful students will be prepared to seek careers as history teachers at the high school and junior college level, as public historians, museum curators, archivists, or in a variety of other professions (journalism, business, government service) which require well-developed skills in research, critical thinking, and oral and written expression.

Goal 1: Students will be able to conduct significant, independent research in their chosen field of concentration.

Goal 2: Students will demonstrate considerable knowledge of disciplinary sub-fields, major interpretive schools of thought, appropriate methodological approaches, and a mastery of the major works in their field of concentration.

Goal 3: Students will be able to combine the results of their primary research with their knowledge of the pertinent secondary and theoretical literature and present their findings both orally and in writing.

Doctor of Arts (D.A.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of UND’s Doctor of Arts program is to provide candidates the opportunity to earn a terminal degree in history that is both rich in content and which will allow them to develop a unique blend of teaching and research skills. The D.A. program is specifically designed to prepare those teachers/scholars whose primary interest revolves around teaching history at the undergraduate level, most particularly at two- and four-year institutions, although the degree also provides opportunities for students to engage in public history of various types. Because the current academic marketplace requires instructors who can teach in multiple fields in a manner informed by the best pedagogical practices, the D.A. degree places heavy emphasis upon mastering a broad range of subject matter (and the attendant methodologies and historiographies) and training in pedagogy, both through coursework and supervised internships. Degree candidates will develop an appropriate level of mastery of materials in four of the following areas of history: Modern European from 1750; Pre-modern European/Mediterranean to 1750; U.S. to 1877: U.S. from 1877; World; a mastery they will document through rigourous examinations. Finally, candidates will also complete a substantial research project within the field of their primary concentration. This work, the capstone to the student’s UND experience, will integrate the lessons of the classroom, the training in varous historical methodologies, and field research work. Ideally, these projects will be suitable for publication and/or public presentation.

Goal 1: Students will be able to teach a broad range of history courses, including United States History, European History, and World History on the undergraduate level.

Goal 2: Students will be able to conduct significant, independent research in their chosen field of concentration.

Goal 3: Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge of disciplinary subfields, major interpretive schools of thought, appropriate methodological approaches and a mastery of the major works in their field of concentration.

Goal 4: Students will be able to integrate and organize their primary research with their knowledge of historiography, methodology, and the pertinent theoretical literature in order to meet specific pedagogical and educational goals.

The Doctor of Arts program has been designated a Western Regional Graduate Program by the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) because of its uniqueness and strength. It is, therefore, open to residents of the thirteen western states at resident tuition rates.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Combined Ph.D. Program with NDSU

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Graduate Program of the History Department of the University of North Dakota is to provide quality graduate-level instruction and supervision in the major fields of Great Plains History, Rural History, North American, and Western European History and in the Minor Fields of Public History and World History. Successful students will be prepared to seek careers as college and university history teachers, as public historians, museum curators and archivists, or in a variety of other professions (journalism, business, government service), which require well-developed skills in research, critical thinking, and oral and written expression.

Goal 1: Students will be able to teach college and university-level courses in fields including Great Plains History, Rural History, North American History, Western European History, Public History and World History.

Goal 2: Students will be able to conduct significant, independent research in their chosen field of concentration.

Goal 3: Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge of disciplinary sub-fields, major interpretive schools of thought, appropriate methodological approaches, and a mastery of the major works in their field of concentration.

Goal 4: Students will be able to combine the results of their primary research with their knowledge of the pertinent secondary and theoretical literature and present their findings both orally and in writing and in their teaching.

 

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the Gradaute School’s current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. Demonstration of preparation for graduate study in history. This includes one of the following from a recognized college or university:
    1. A bachelor’s degree in history, or
    2. An undergraduate degree with a minimum of 20 semester credits in history with at least 6 credits at the upper division level, or
    3. An undergraduate degree or combination of classes clearly demonstrating the applicant’s ability to pursue graduate study in history.
  2. An overall undergraduate GPA of at least 3.00 and at least 3.25 in all undergraduate history courses.
  3. A writing sample, preferably a research or seminar paper, that demonstrates the applicant’s research, analytical and writing skills.
  4. Three letters of recommendation with at least two coming from individuals who hold or have held academic positions and who can comment on the applicant’s aptitude for graduate work.
  5. A one-to-two page statement that explains the applicant’s interest in history, the reason for applying to the UND graduate program, and the area or areas in which the applicant intends to take courses and conduct research.
  6. The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  7. To insure full consideration of applications, especially for tuition waivers and graduate teaching assistantships, the application deadline for Fall admission is March 15 and for Spring admission, it is September 30. Later applications will be considered.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Arts degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements of the School of Graduate Studies as well as requirements of the History Department.

Thesis Option

  1. The M.A. degree (thesis option) requires a minimum of 30 credit hours.
  2. In consultation with a designated advisor, the student will select a supervisory committee and prepare a program of study that provides the student with the academic tools necessary for advanced scholarly research, responds to the student’s academic and professional interests and goals, and fulfills all degree requirements. At the discretion of the student’s advisor, this program may require demonstrable proficiency in a foreign language and may include a minor or cognate.
  3. The following coursework is required:
    HIST 501Methods of Historical Research3
    HIST 502Historiography3
    Select one of the following (research seminar):3
    Research Seminar in American History
    Research Seminar in World History
    Research Seminar in European History
    Select two of the following (reading courses):6
    Readings in World History
    Readings in American History
    Readings in European History
    Electives9
    HIST 998Thesis6
    Total Credits30
  4. The candidate will successfully complete, defend and submit to the School of Graduate Studies a thesis that meets the History Department’s established guidelines.

Non-Thesis Option

  1. The M.A. degree (non-thesis option) requires a total of 35 credit hours.
  2. In consultation with a designated advisor, the student will select a supervisory committee and prepare a program of study that provides the student with the academic tools necessary for advanced scholarly research, responds to the student’s academic and professional interests and goals, and fulfills all degree requirements. At the discretion of the student’s advisor, this program may require demonstrable proficiency in a foreign language, and may include a minor or cognate.
  3. The following coursework is required:
    HIST 501Methods of Historical Research3
    HIST 502Historiography3
    Select two of the following (research seminar):6
    Research Seminar in American History
    Research Seminar in World History
    Research Seminar in European History
    Select two of the following (reading courses):6
    Readings in World History
    Readings in American History
    Readings in European History
    Electives *15
    HIST 997Independent Study (see #4 below)2
    Total Credits35

    *

    With the approval of the student’s advisor, up to twelve of these credits may be taken within the minor or cognate.

  4. The candidate will successfully complete a scholarly independent investigation of a topic chosen in consultation with the advisor and members of the supervisory committee.
  5. The candidate will successfully complete a comprehensive written examination administered by the advisor and supervisory committee, responding to the student’s program of study.

 

Doctor of Arts (D.A.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’s current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. All M.A. admission requirements.
  2. A master’s degree, preferably in history and with thesis, but at least 15 semester credits of history at the graduate level.
  3. A GPA of at least 3.50 for the master’s level work.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  5. Preference will be given to applicants with teaching experience, especially in the fields of history, the social sciences, or the humanities.
  6. To insure full consideration of applications, especially for tuition waivers and graduate teaching assistantships, the application deadline for Fall admission is March 15 and for Spring admission it is September 30. Later applications will be considered.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Arts degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements of the School of Graduate Studies as well as specific requirements of the History Department.

  1. Completion of 90 semester credits beyond the baccalaureate degree, including acceptable master’s work.
  2. The following coursework:
    HIST 501Methods of Historical Research3
    HIST 502Historiography3
    HIST 551Seminar in the Teaching of History3
    Select one of the following (research seminar):3
    Research Seminar in American History
    Research Seminar in World History
    Research Seminar in European History
    Select two of the following (reading courses):6
    Readings in World History
    Readings in American History
    Readings in European History
    Total Credits18
  3. An area of concentration in one of the following fields: U.S. History to 1877, U.S. History since 1877, Pre-Modern European/Mediterranean History to 1750, Modern European History, World History. The concentration will include:
    1. 12 elective graduate credits in the field of concentration.
    2. HIST 595 Research (12 credits). An independent research project exploring a topic of significant concern to historians and teachers of history.
  4. The following coursework:
    T&L 539College Teaching3
    Select one of the following:3
    Psychological Foundations Educ
    Assessment in Higher Education
    Adult Learners
    Technology in Higher Education
    Total Credits6
  5. HIST 599 Internship in the Teaching of History (9 credits): A teaching internship of nine credits. Supervision of the internship is the responsibility of the student’s faculty advisor or an alternative named by the Department Graduate Committee. Students in the internship will teach:
    HIST 101
      & HIST 102
    Western Civilization I
       and Western Civilization II
    6
    or HIST 103
      & HIST 104
    United States to 1877
       and United States since 1877
    A course at the 200 or 300 level in their field of concentration
  6. Written examinations in both United States fields and in two of the three European fields selected on the basis of work done in a Master’s degree program as well as the doctoral program. (Exams may be taken after 60 hours of the program of study have been completed.)

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Combined Ph.D. Program with NDSU

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. Preference for admission into the Ph.D. program with full graduate standing will be given to applicants who have a GPA of at least 3.5 in history courses in an earned bachelor’s or master’s degree.
  2. Applicants will submit a statement of intent clearly outlining the applicant’s research interests, career goals, and purpose for seeking a Ph.D. in history.
  3. Applicants will submit a substantial paper previously submitted for a class in history to provide evidence of ability to research thoroughly, to interpret and analyze primary and secondary sources, to synthesize information, to organize thoughts logically, and to communicate clearly and effectively.
  4. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination are required.
  5. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements of the School of Graduate Studies as well as specific requirements of the History Department.

  1. Students must satisfactorily complete 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree. Students entering with an M.A. degree must complete at least 60 additional semester graduate credits. Core course requirements must be met which include: Methods of Historical Research, Historiography, Seminar in the Teaching of History, at least two research seminars, and at least two readings courses. Students must complete 36 course credits with at least 27 credits in history courses. Students will earn 12 credits in two or more major fields. Students may choose a third major field or a minor field (nine semester credits).
  2. Students must have a proficiency in two languages other than their native language or one foreign language and one special research skill such as statistics or computer science.
  3. The program will require at least one academic year in residence at either campus. Each student will register at one of the universities that will be the student’s academic “home.” The student’s adviser must be employed in the home university. At least one member of the student’s committee must be employed at the other (not home) university. Students may have to take courses at both universities.
  4. Students will write three comprehensive examinations in their major and minor fields. The exams will be read and graded by the supervisory committee. Students will complete an oral examination based on the written exams. The oral examination is to be conducted by the supervisory committee.
  5. Students will write a dissertation (up to 24 credits) on an approved topic in consultation with the faculty adviser and the supervisory committee of five faculty. The dissertation must be based on extensive research in primary and secondary sources, must argue an original thesis, and must be defended before the supervisory committee.
  6. The committee will be composed of the faculty adviser who represents the student’s field of study and who will direct the research and writing of the dissertation. A second member of the committee (second reader) represents the student’s major field of study. A third member of the committee will represent the student’s minor field of study. The fourth member of the committee represents either the student’s major field or minor field. At least one of the four history faculty must be from the cooperating (non-home) university. The School of Graduate Studies will appoint the fifth member of the committee.

Residency Requirements

  1. Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program are required to complete at least one academic year (18 credits minimum) in residence at one campus.
  2. Resident students may qualify for teaching assistantships. Students who have completed a M.A. degree may be assigned full responsibility for undergraduate courses or may be assigned to assist a faculty member in teaching courses.
  3. Students will be required to take some courses from faculty at both campuses, but will register at only one university. Some courses will be offered by interactive video network, some will be offered through internet online systems, some courses will require students to travel to the other campus.
  4. Students not residing on one of the cooperating campuses will have to have access to a satisfactory research library for various courses and for dissertation research.

Courses

‡ All 593 and 594 courses involve reading, bibliographical study, discussion, and writing. Study may be confined to a subtopic within the general subject area. Repeatable with different subtopics. Students in the M.A. program will not ordinarily take more than one 593 or 594 in the primary concentration.

The following undergraduate courses are eligible for inclusion on graduate programs of study. Additional assignments and higher standards of accomplishment are required of students taking these courses for graduate credit.

HIST 344Ancient Rome3
HIST 405The United States: Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-18503
HIST 406The United States: Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-18773
HIST 407The United States: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-19173
HIST 408The United States, 1920-19453
HIST 412U.S.Foreign Relations since 19003
HIST 413The United States since 19453
HIST 419Great Britain since 18153
HIST 431Seminar in the History of the Great Plains3
HIST 460The Atlantic World3
HIST 470United States-Canadian Relations, 1776 to the Present3
HIST 480Introduction to Public History3
HIST 481Public History Practice3

Major Fields

Great Plains History
Rural History
North American History
Western European History

Minor Fields

Public History
World History

Libraries

The combined UND/NDSU libraries contain over two million volumes. In addition, each university library houses an archive of historic materials that has supported the research of many faculty members and visiting scholars.

The catalogs of the Chester Fritz Library and the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections at the University of North Dakota are available online.

The catalog of the Libraries at North Dakota State University is available online along with the catalog of the Institute for Regional Studies.

The North Dakota State University Library also houses the Germans From Russia Heritage Collection.

Locations

The University of North Dakota is in Grand Forks and North Dakota State University is in Fargo. Both cities are situated along Interstate 29 about 75 miles apart.

Courses

HIST 501. Methods of Historical Research. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to teach graduate students to comprehend, analyze, apply, and evaluate the basic techniques and frameworks for historical research. These include basic historical theories, methods, and problems (such as causality, objectivity, types of evidence, schools of historical thought, evaluation of sources, qualitative and quantitative analysis). Students will also learn how to use standard databases and bibliographical aids to find, identify, and assess appropriate information to support, modify, or reject historical interpretations and arguments. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

HIST 502. Historiography. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for advanced degrees in history. An introduction to the history of historical thought, from the classical Greeks to the present, with examination of some of the works of important historians writing in the western tradition. The first half of the course is primarily devoted to classical and European historians; the second half is primarily devoted to modern and American historians.

HIST 503. Advanced Historical Methods. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a specific historical research methodology through instruction and practice. Repeatable up to 6 credits.

HIST 511. Research Seminar in American History. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Arts, and Master of Arts who do not take History 515. This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of American History. Repeatable.

HIST 513. Research Seminar in World History. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the research and writing of World History with a stress on the proper utilization of comparative and thematic methodology. It requires the preparation of a research paper that utilizes the methodology of World History.

HIST 515. Research Seminar in European History. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Arts, and Master of Arts who do not take History 511. This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of European History. Repeatable.

HIST 520. Material Culture. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a material culture research methodology through reading, discussion, research, and writing.

HIST 521. Public History. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the practice of public history through readings, discussion and practice. Repeatable to six credits.

HIST 551. Seminar in the Teaching of History. 3 Credits.

Required of all students pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Arts. Includes methods appropriate to college-level teaching. Class consists of discussion, demonstration, and practice. S.

HIST 585. Directed Readings. 3 Credits.

Independent, directed readings on a topic tailored to the individual needs of the student. Doctoral students may repeat this course to a maximum of 6 credits; Masters students may not repeat the course. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

HIST 592. Readings in World History. 3 Credits.

This course focuses upon the reading and understanding of World History historiography, theories and methods through thematic and comparative readings. Repeatable.

HIST 593. Readings in American History. 2-3 Credits.

Topics vary. Involves reading, bibliographical study, discussion, and writing. Study may be confined to a subtopic within the general subject area. Repeatable with different subtopics. Students in the M.A. program with a U.S. primary concentration will not ordinarily take more than one 593.

HIST 594. Readings in European History. 2-3 Credits.

Topics vary. Involves reading, bibliographical study, discussion, and writing. Study may be confined to a subtopic within the general subject area. Repeatable with different subtopics. Students in the M.A. program with a European primary concentration will not ordinarily take more than one 594.

HIST 595. Research. 1-6 Credits.

Requires a research project that will be a component of the area of concentration. Repeatable to 12 credits. Prerequisite: Candidates for the Doctor of Arts only.

HIST 599. Internship in the Teaching of History. 3 Credits.

The internship requires the teaching of three courses to demonstrate proficiency in college-level teaching at the undergraduate level. Although the teaching is supervised, the student has full responsibility for the courses. The internship may be conducted on this campus or, with proper arrangement and supervision, on another campus. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: Candidates for the Doctor of Arts only.

HIST 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

HIST 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

HIST 998. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

HIST 999. Dissertation. 3-24 Credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

HIST 344. Ancient Rome. 3 Credits.

A survey of the prehistory, historical development, and ultimate decline in Rome. In addition to inquiries into the military, political, cultural, economic, and religious experiences of the ancient Romans, this course will attempt to delineate those qualities of life that were peculiarly Roman. S, even years.

HIST 405. The United States: Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1850. 3 Credits.

A study of the creation of a new, expansive nationalism in the development of new institutions and new national character, and the simultaneous growth of sectional forces which brought the new nation to the brink of Civil War. F, even years.

HIST 406. The United States: Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877. 3 Credits.

A study of the acceleration of the forces of sectionalism and racism that caused the temporary breakdown of the American democratic process and the tragedy of Civil War and Reconstruction. S, odd years.

HIST 407. The United States: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1917. 3 Credits.

A survey of the rise of America to industrial and world power. Emphasis is placed upon the great changes which the Industrial Revolution brought and the American response to these changes. Detailed attention is given to the Populist and Progressive movements. F, odd years.

HIST 408. The United States, 1920-1945. 3 Credits.

A study of American society from the end of World War I through World War II. Emphasis will be placed upon the Republican ascendancy and social changes during the 1920s, the causes of the Great Depression, the New Deal, the road to World War II, and the war, especially the homefront. F, odd years.

HIST 412. U.S.Foreign Relations since 1900. 3 Credits.

An advanced survey of the major policies advocated and pursued by the U.S. during the 20th century. S, odd years.

HIST 413. The United States since 1945. 3 Credits.

An advanced examination of the United States as it has developed from the height of its power, influence, and prosperity through years of upheaval, cultural and political transformation, and economic decline. F, even years.

HIST 419. Great Britain since 1815. 3 Credits.

A survey of British history since 1815 with an emphasis on the state of mind known as "Victorian," as it was manifested, practiced, or criticized in the nineteenth century; its influence on economics, politics, foreign affairs, and social policy; and its vestiges in modern-day Britain. F, even years.

HIST 431. Seminar in the History of the Great Plains. 3 Credits.

This course promotes focused study of the Great Plains of North America through reading, discussion, research, and writing. Students will examine all aspects of Great Plains history including culture, environment, social organization, economics, and politics from the ancient past to the present. S, odd years.

HIST 460. The Atlantic World. 3 Credits.

This is a comparative world history course that focuses upon the cultural, economic, social, political, ideological and religious interaction, competition, conflict and change between Western Europe, West Africa, and the Americas. The course will begin in the 1400s by examining the foundations of European expansion and end with the revolutions of the Americas and Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A major focus of the class will be cultural interaction, the slave trade, and the foundations of the modern world system. F, odd years.

HIST 470. United States-Canadian Relations, 1776 to the Present. 3 Credits.

This course explores the historical relationships linking and dividing Canada and the United States of America since 1774. Because of the unique constitutional and diplomatic status of British North America and then Canada itself, this course examines the often complex tri-partite relationship between the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain. F, even years.

HIST 480. Introduction to Public History. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public history at federal, state, and local levels. Emphasis is given to archival theory, oral history, museum studies and historic preservation, with attention to awareness of historical resources. On demand.

HIST 481. Public History Practice. 3 Credits.

A practicum in which the student learns through experience the techniques of public history work. S, odd years.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382