History

Courses

HIST 501. Methods of Historical Research. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to teach graduate students to comprehend, analyze, apply, and evaluate the basic techniques and frameworks for historical research. These include basic historical theories, methods, and problems (such as causality, objectivity, types of evidence, schools of historical thought, evaluation of sources, qualitative and quantitative analysis). Students will also learn how to use standard databases and bibliographical aids to find, identify, and assess appropriate information to support, modify, or reject historical interpretations and arguments. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

HIST 502. Historiography. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for advanced degrees in history. An introduction to the history of historical thought, from the classical Greeks to the present, with examination of some of the works of important historians writing in the western tradition. The first half of the course is primarily devoted to classical and European historians; the second half is primarily devoted to modern and American historians.

HIST 503. Advanced Historical Methods. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a specific historical research methodology through instruction and practice. Repeatable up to 6 credits. Repeatable to 6 credits.

HIST 511. Research Seminar in American History. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Arts, and Master of Arts who do not take History 515. This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of American History. Repeatable. Repeatable.

HIST 513. Research Seminar in World History. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the research and writing of World History with a stress on the proper utilization of comparative and thematic methodology. It requires the preparation of a research paper that utilizes the methodology of World History.

HIST 515. Research Seminar in European History. 3 Credits.

Required for all candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Arts, and Master of Arts who do not take History 511. This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of European History. Repeatable. Repeatable.

HIST 520. Material Culture. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a material culture research methodology through reading, discussion, research, and writing.

HIST 521. Public History. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the practice of public history through readings, discussion and practice. Repeatable to six credits. Repeatable to 6 credits.

HIST 551. Seminar in the Teaching of History. 3 Credits.

Required of all students pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Arts. Includes methods appropriate to college-level teaching. Class consists of discussion, demonstration, and practice. S.

HIST 585. Directed Readings. 3 Credits.

Independent, directed readings on a topic tailored to the individual needs of the student. Doctoral students may repeat this course to a maximum of 6 credits; Masters students may not repeat the course. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

HIST 592. Readings in World History. 3 Credits.

This course focuses upon the reading and understanding of World History historiography, theories and methods through thematic and comparative readings. Repeatable. Repeatable.

HIST 593. Readings in American History. 2-3 Credits.

Topics vary. Involves reading, bibliographical study, discussion, and writing. Study may be confined to a subtopic within the general subject area. Repeatable with different subtopics. Students in the M.A. program with a U.S. primary concentration will not ordinarily take more than one 593.. Repeatable to 30 credits.

HIST 594. Readings in European History. 2-3 Credits.

Topics vary. Involves reading, bibliographical study, discussion, and writing. Study may be confined to a subtopic within the general subject area. Repeatable with different subtopics. Students in the M.A. program with a European primary concentration will not ordinarily take more than one 594.. Repeatable to 36 credits.

HIST 595. Research. 1-6 Credits.

Requires a research project that will be a component of the area of concentration. Repeatable to 12 credits. Prerequisite: Candidates for the Doctor of Arts only. Repeatable to 12 credits.

HIST 599. Internship in the Teaching of History. 3 Credits.

The internship requires the teaching of three courses to demonstrate proficiency in college-level teaching at the undergraduate level. Although the teaching is supervised, the student has full responsibility for the courses. The internship may be conducted on this campus or, with proper arrangement and supervision, on another campus. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: Candidates for the Doctor of Arts only. Repeatable to 9 credits. S/U grading.

HIST 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. S/U grading.

HIST 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

HIST 998. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable to 6 credits.

HIST 999. Dissertation. 3-24 Credits.

Repeatable to 24 credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

HIST 344. Ancient Rome. 3 Credits.

A survey of the prehistory, historical development, and ultimate decline in Rome. In addition to inquiries into the military, political, cultural, economic, and religious experiences of the ancient Romans, this course will attempt to delineate those qualities of life that were peculiarly Roman. S, even years.

HIST 405. The United States: Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1850. 3 Credits.

A study of the creation of a new, expansive nationalism in the development of new institutions and new national character, and the simultaneous growth of sectional forces which brought the new nation to the brink of Civil War. F, even years.

HIST 406. The United States: Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877. 3 Credits.

A study of the acceleration of the forces of sectionalism and racism that caused the temporary breakdown of the American democratic process and the tragedy of Civil War and Reconstruction. S, odd years.

HIST 407. The United States: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1917. 3 Credits.

A survey of the rise of America to industrial and world power. Emphasis is placed upon the great changes which the Industrial Revolution brought and the American response to these changes. Detailed attention is given to the Populist and Progressive movements. F, odd years.

HIST 408. The United States, 1920-1945. 3 Credits.

A study of American society from the end of World War I through World War II. Emphasis will be placed upon the Republican ascendancy and social changes during the 1920s, the causes of the Great Depression, the New Deal, the road to World War II, and the war, especially the homefront. F, odd years.

HIST 412. U.S.Foreign Relations since 1900. 3 Credits.

An advanced survey of the major policies advocated and pursued by the U.S. during the 20th century. S, odd years.

HIST 413. The United States since 1945. 3 Credits.

An advanced examination of the United States as it has developed from the height of its power, influence, and prosperity through years of upheaval, cultural and political transformation, and economic decline. F, even years.

HIST 419. Great Britain since 1815. 3 Credits.

A survey of British history since 1815 with an emphasis on the state of mind known as "Victorian," as it was manifested, practiced, or criticized in the nineteenth century; its influence on economics, politics, foreign affairs, and social policy; and its vestiges in modern-day Britain. F, even years.

HIST 431. Seminar in the History of the Great Plains. 3 Credits.

This course promotes focused study of the Great Plains of North America through reading, discussion, research, and writing. Students will examine all aspects of Great Plains history including culture, environment, social organization, economics, and politics from the ancient past to the present. S, odd years.

HIST 470. United States-Canadian Relations, 1776 to the Present. 3 Credits.

This course explores the historical relationships linking and dividing Canada and the United States of America since 1774. Because of the unique constitutional and diplomatic status of British North America and then Canada itself, this course examines the often complex tri-partite relationship between the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain. F, even years.

HIST 480. Introduction to Public History. 3 Credits.

An introduction to public history at federal, state, and local levels. Emphasis is given to archival theory, oral history, museum studies and historic preservation, with attention to awareness of historical resources. On demand.

HIST 481. Public History Practice. 3 Credits.

A practicum in which the student learns through experience the techniques of public history work. S, odd years.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382