2014-2015 Catalog

Education

http://www.und.edu/dept/ehd/

FACULTY: Baker, Barrentine, Beck, Borgeson, Burris, Chalmers, Chiasson, Combs, De Long, Gallo, Gershman, Gourneau, Guy, Healy, Helgeson, Holdman, Holen, Houdek, S. Hung, W. Hung, C. Hunter, Ingwalson, Jacobson, Johnson, Kallio, Keengwe, Lee, LeMire, Mahar, Olson, Onchwari, Ozaki, Pearson, Rice, Rocha, Salyers, Schnellert, Shafer, Smart, Stupnisky, Sun, Terras, Van Eck, Walker, M. Weaver-Hightower, Worley, Yearwood and Zidon

Graduate programs in education are housed in three departments of the College of Education and Human Development. Faculty in the Departments of Educational Foundations and Research, Educational Leadership, and Teaching and Learning work closely together in design and delivery of the graduate programs described in this section. The department chairs and program coordinators are listed below.

Department Chairpersons

Educational Foundations and ResearchS. LeMire
Educational LeadershipT. Steen
Teaching and LearningM. Baker

Program Coordinators

Early Childhood EducationK. Votava
Education: General StudiesJ. Holen
Educational Foundations and ResearchK. Gershman
Educational Leadership PK-12 EmphasisS. Houdek
Elementary EducationB. Gourneau
English Language Learner EducationJ. Shafer
Higher EducationM. Healy
Instructional Design and TechnologyW. Hung
Reading EducationS. Barrentine
Special EducationL. Chalmers
Teaching and Learning Doctoral ProgramM. Zidon

Graduate programs in education at UND are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through 2015, and those leading to teacher licensure or endorsement or to an advanced educator credential are approved by the North Dakota Education Standards and Practices Board and the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction as appropriate.

Design of Graduate Programs: Critical Inquiry

The College of Education and Human Development admits to advanced programs for educators students who are self-directed learners with considerable experience in the practice of education. Viewing knowledge as holistic, interconnected, and never fully defined, we encourage students to define their own programs of study within the framework of critical inquiry.

Critical inquiry begins as students, individually or in groups, identify and seek resolution to problems in education. Students engaged in critical inquiry observe and try to understand differences in proposed resolutions to problems; explore problem situations and the consequences of various resolutions; seek further definition of issues through reading, interaction, research, and creative activity; and further professional abilities consistent with their own understandings of directions for policy and practice in education. Foundational studies in education and the study of research methodologies contribute to student’s ability to engage in critical inquiry.

Goals that inform graduate programs for teachers are drawn from the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

Programs Offered

Program Degrees Available
Early Childhood Education M.S.
Educational Foundations & Research Ph.D.
Educational Leadership M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.
Education-General Studies M.S.
Elementary Education M.Ed., M.S.
English Language Learner Education M.Ed.
Higher Education M.S., Ed.D., Ph.D.
Instructional Design and Technology M.Ed., M.S.
Reading Education M.Ed., M.S.
Special Education M.Ed., M.S.
Teaching and Learning Ed.D., Ph.D.

Degrees Offered

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) and the Specialist Diploma (Ed.S) focus graduate study on professional practice from a broad educational perspective and admit only licensed educators. Both programs require completion of a final research paper or special project to culminate degree study. Refer to the Degree Requirements section of this catalog for a discussion of M.Ed.and Specialist Diploma requirements.

The Master of Science (M.S.) degrees offered in education admit students who are licensed educators and others interested in the study of education. Degree requirements vary according to the background of the student and are described in the section devoted to each program. M.S. degree programs are available with thesis and non-thesis options.

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees are designed to prepare persons for leadership in the public schools or other educational agencies and for teaching and administration in colleges or universities. Study at the doctoral level requires that the student demonstrate analytic inquiry and creative scholarship in the study of education. The Ed.D. program focuses on study of professional practice and requires completion of independent work leading to an original dissertation with implications for the practice of education. The Ph.D. program emphasizes educational research and requires completion of independent work leading to an original dissertation focused on educational theory. Refer to the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog for delineation of requirements for the Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

For a complete picture of each degree program, the student is advised to read sections discussing the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies referenced in the paragraphs above, the requirements of the Education faculty in the following section, the pages devoted to discussion of each of the programs offered, and the graduate handbooks available from the dean of the College of Education and Human Development and/or the department.

Admissions Process

Success in the graduate study of education is related to qualities of mind, motivation, literacy, and experience. Among the qualities of mind sought in candidates for admission to Education programs are creativity, intelligence, independence of thought, willingness to take risks, openness to new ideas, openness to diversity, and flexibility of thought. Motivation is demonstrated by commitment to learners of all ages, professional growth, self-direction, and commitment to academic study leading to a graduate degree. Literacy is the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Experience may be demonstrated by diverse activities including work with children or adults in a variety of settings, foreign or domestic travel, and a liberal education. Each student brings a different mix of characteristics and strengths to graduate study.

Within the catalog, each graduate program lists specific admission requirements. Consult the website for up-to-date admissions processes for each program.

Scholarly Tools

The scholarly tool requirement for the M.S., Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees is an integral part of the graduate degree program. Since the purpose of the scholarly tool requirement in graduate study is to enable the student to read, understand and conduct research, the tools are to be directly related to the research interests of each graduate student. Achievement levels will be demonstrated by satisfactory completion of coursework in the appropriate scholarly tool area(s) or by a proficiency examination. A minimum of five semester credits in appropriate coursework for the M.S. degree is required.

There is no scholarly tool requirement for the M.Ed. or Ed.S. degrees. For the Ph.D., the minimum scholarly tool requirements of 12 credits may be met by one of the following options:

Option 1: Qualitative emphasis option:

EFR 510Qualitative Research Methods (or equivalents)3
EFR 520Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (or equivalents)3
EFR 516Statistics II (or equivalents)3
Approved Electives3
Total Credits12

Option 2: Quantitative emphasis option:

EFR 510Qualitative Research Methods (or equivalents)3
EFR 516Statistics II (or equivalents)3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Research Methodologies (or equivalents)
Multivariate Analysis (or equivalents)
Research Seminar (or equivalents)
Approved Electives3
Total Credits12

Option 3: Tests and measurements option:

EFR 511Program Evaluation (or equivalents)3
EFR 512Educational Tests and Measurements (or equivalents)3
EFR 516Statistics II (or equivalents)3
EFR 517Advanced Research Methodologies (or equivalents)3
Total Credits12

The student’s advisory committee may approve an exception to these three specializations upon consultation with the research faculty. An appropriate exception would be a different sequence of studies that assures breadth and depth in the research process that is related to both the student’s career goals in research and in regard to the student’s research.

For the Ed.D., the minimum scholarly tool requirements of six credits may be met by one of the following options:

Option 1: Qualitative emphasis option:

EFR 510Qualitative Research Methods (or equivalents)3
EFR 520Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (or equivalents)3
Total Credits6

Option 2: Quantitative emphasis option:

EFR 516Statistics II (or equivalents)3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Research Methodologies (or equivalents)
Multivariate Analysis (or equivalents)
Research Seminar (or equivalents)
Total Credits6

Option 3: Tests and measurements option:

EFR 511Program Evaluation (or equivalents)3
EFR 512Educational Tests and Measurements (or equivalents)3
Total Credits6

The student’s advisory committee may approve an exception to these three specializations upon consultation with the research faculty. An appropriate exception would be a different sequence of studies that assures breadth and depth in the research process that is related to both the student’s career goals in research and to the student’s research.

Thesis and Independent Study Reports

All master’s degrees and the Ed.S. culminate in a final paper or project. The thesis in the Master of Science degree earns four to six credits. Both the Master of Education and the Master of Science (non-thesis) degrees require a two-credit independent study or Final Project instead of a thesis. The independent study requirement may be met by completing a formal master’s paper. The Final Project requirement is met by completing a project that demonstrates critical analysis of a topic in a scholarly way and integrates information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. All theses, independent studies, or final projects must be based on an approved proposal. Note that the Department of Educational Leadership may have requirements that differ from those noted above.

Comprehensive Examinations

Master’s and Specialist Diploma students in the Department of Educational Leadership take comprehensive examinations in the semester during which graduation is expected. Candidates take comprehensive examinations after making formal application to receive the Master’s or Specialist’s degree and having been notified of eligibility in writing by the School of Graduate Studies. Students enrolled in the following master’s programs complete a Final Project in lieu of comprehensive exams: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, General Studies, Reading Education, and Special Education.

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Education (M.Ed.), Specialist Diploma (Spec. Dip.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Graduate programs in Education are housed in three departments of the College of Education and Human Development. Faculty in the Departments of Educational Foundations and Research, Educational Leadership, and Teaching and Learning work closely together in design and delivery of the graduate programs described in this section. The graduate programs are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through 2015, and those leading to teacher licensure or endorsement or to an advanced educator credential are approved by the North Dakota Education Standards and Practices Board and the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction as appropriate.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Educational Foundations and Research

http://www.und.edu/dept/efr/

FACULTY: Gershman (Graduate Director), S. Hung, C. Hunter, LeMire (Chair), Rocha, Stupnisky and M. Weaver-Hightower

Degree Granted: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of Educational Foundations and Research provides programs for educators and other professionals interested in educational foundations, educational evaluation, and/or educational research. The department is committed to the encouragement of interdisciplinary efforts and to increased understanding of our multicultural society.

The Department cooperates with the Department of Teaching and Learning in offering an M.S. in Education—General Studies. See the descriptions under Teaching and Learning for the details related to their program. Students are admitted to these programs following procedures established by the college.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Department of Educational Foundations and Research provides courses for educators and other professionals interested in educational foundations, educational evaluation, and/or educational research. The department is committed to the encouragement of interdisciplinary efforts and to increased understanding of our multicultural society. We cooperate with the Department of Teaching and Learning in advisement of the M.S. General Studies degree and the Ph.D. in Educational Foundations and Research (below).

The Ph.D. degree will prepare students for professional positions that rely on a full understanding of the broad intellectual and scholarly themes that are foundational to good practice, as well as excellent research skills. Students will study both the Foundations of Education as well as Research Methodologies, choosing to emphasize one or the other (see requirements below). They will design a graduate minor or cognate uniquely suited to their scholarly and research interests.

Educational Leadership

http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/edl/degrees.html

FACULTY: DeLong, Healy, Houdek (Chair and Graduate Program Director), Kallio, Rice, Schnellert, Stonehouse, Sun and Worley

Degrees Granted: Master of Education (M.Ed.), Specialist Diploma (Ed.S.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Department of Educational Leadership prides itself on being a leader in the field with an internationally recognized academic program that combines theory and practice to provide a scholar-practitioner educational model. Our innovative and responsive curriculum fosters intellectual vitality and facilitates the development of our world-class students and faculty.

The academic experience is designed to provide our students with an understanding of basic concepts and advanced knowledge of educational leadership. The academic offerings apply to leadership positions in the elementary, middle, secondary, and higher education levels as well as for the non-profit sector.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The M.Ed. program in Educational Leadership is designed to prepare students for administrative positions in either elementary, middle school or secondary schools. Upon completion of the M.Ed. degree, a student will have completed the academic requirements for the North Dakota principal credential at PK-12 levels. Applicants for the M.Ed. must be licensed to teach and it is recommended they have a minimum of three years of teaching experience.

Goal 1: Candidates demonstrate an understanding of how students develop and learn with respect to individual, contextual and cultural differences, and an ability to take account of these differences in their practice.

Goal 2: Candidates demonstrate an ability to be effective communicators both orally and in writing.

Goal 3: Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the subjects they teach (content knowledge).

Goal 4: Candidates demonstrate ability to teach their subject areas (pedagogical knowledge) to students.

Goal 5: Candidates demonstrate an ability to create, enrich, maintain and alter instructional settings to capture and sustain the interest of their students and to make the most effective use of time.

Goal 6: Candidates demonstrate an ability to assess the progress of students through multiple methods, adjust practice to meet students’ assessed needs and clearly explain student performance to parents, appropriate school personnel and administrators.

Goal 7: Candidates research and reflect systematically about their practice and so deepen their knowledge and adapt and strengthen their practice.

Goal 8: Candidates demonstrate ability to collaborate with others as members of learning communities who can contribute to the effectiveness of the school.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

It is the mission of the Educational Leadership Doctoral Program to prepare persons for leadership and teaching positions in schools, colleges or universities, and public or private agencies. The following four goals apply to all areas of emphasis within the program PK-12 education and higher education.

Goal 1: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how personal educational practice guides and supports the learning of others.

Goal 2: The student will demonstrate the ability to apply research and research methods relevant to the field of study.

Goal 3: The student will demonstrate knowledge and application of educational practices related to the foundations (personal, historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, psychological, and/or multicultural) for learning and teaching.

Goal 4: The student will demonstrate knowledge and skills in understanding ways of engaging learners in the active construction of knowledge relevant to the advanced discipline of study.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

It is the mission of the Educational Leadership Doctoral Program to prepare persons for leadership and teaching positions in schools, colleges or universities, and public or private agencies. The following four goals apply to all areas of emphasis within the program PK-12 education and higher education.

Goal 1: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how personal educational practice guides and supports the learning of others.

Goal 2: The student will demonstrate the ability to apply research and research methods relevant to the field of study.

Goal 3: The student will demonstrate knowledge and application of educational practices related to the foundations (personal, historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, psychological, and/or multicultural) for learning and teaching.

Goal 4: The student will demonstrate knowledge and skills in understanding ways of engaging learners in the active construction of knowledge relevant to the advanced discipline of study.

Early Childhood Education

http://www.und.edu/dept/tl/ece/

FACULTY: Burris, Gallo, Olsen, Onchwari, Votava (Graduate Director) and J. Yearwood (Director)

Degree Granted: Master of Science (M.S.)

The focus of the M.S. program in Early Childhood Education is on the advanced preparation of teachers and leaders in the field of Early Childhood Education. The program addresses the education of children age 3 through grade 3 by concentrating on the study of children ages 3-8 and the implications such study holds for educational practice. This degree does not lead to initial teacher licensure. Those pursuing this program will be prepared as professional teachers/leaders in a variety of early childhood settings, including public and private schools (Pre-K-grade 3), Head Start programs, child development and childcare centers, and college and University settings.

The Early Childhood education program is administered through the Department of Teaching & Learning in the College of Education and Human Development (EHD) and the UND School of Graduate Studies. The programs follow the policies of Early Childhood Education, the Department of Teaching & Learning, EHD, UND, UND School of Graduate Studies and NDUS.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The mission of the Early Childhood Education program is to teach and empower educators and leaders in the field of Early Childhood Education. The focus in this program is on educating teachers to be careful and open-minded observers who develop early learning curriculum and programs with the child in mind; thus, the child is at the center of the program, and the source of study.

The program is committed to establishing a theoretical foundation based on research in the field of early childhood education that is combined with practical experiences to prepare professionals who will:

  1. Encourage the child’s natural curiosity and exploration of the environment;
  2. Develop an understanding of human diversity and recognize its value in a community of learners;
  3. Become reflective in their approach to teaching and leadership;
  4. Develop supportive and productive learning environments for children, teachers, parents, and support staff;
  5. Integrate knowledge of children with special needs into curriculum and program development.

Elementary Education

http://education.und.edu/teaching-and-learning/grad-elem-ed.cfm

FACULTY: Baker, Barrentine, Beck, Combs, Gourneau (Graduate Director), Guy, Helgeson, Keengwe, Shafer, and Walker

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.) and Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The Master of Science (MS) and the Master of Education (M.Ed) degrees are offered by the Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education and Human Development. These two Elementary Education Master Programs strive for excellence in education for all learners. The Programs are dedicated to the professional development of responsive teachers as learners, active agents of learning, and articulate visionaries. We provide high quality educational experiences that emphasize inquiry, reflection, and collaboration. In order to be accessible to our graduate students we offer Programs in a variety of formats including campus based and distance degrees.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Master of Science: Elementary Education is committed to preparing knowledgeable and responsive educators through the advanced study of research, creative scholarship, and educational theory. Students in the program will:

  • Commit to the continuing process of learning with an emphasis on learning to teach.
  • Become more confident, responsive, and reflective as decision-makers in their educational learning communities.
  • Plan, implement, and evaluate strategies of research in education.
  • Examine practices and assumptions in schools, including moral and ethical standards along with the concerns of schools in society.
  • Embrace inclusive diversity by meeting the varied needs of students and communities.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education: Elementary Education is committed to preparing knowledgeable and responsive educators through the advanced study of professional practice, theory, and foundations of education. Students in the program will:

  • Commit to the continuing process of learning with an emphasis on learning to teach.
  • Examine best practices, skills, and values to effectively teach all students.
  • Become more confident, responsive, and reflective as decision-makers in their educational learning communities.
  • Learn to adapt curricular experiences to provide for individual needs, backgrounds, interests, and learning standards.
  • Embrace inclusive diversity by meeting the varied needs of students and communities.

English Language Learners (TESOL)

http://www.und.edu/dept/tl/html/ELL/index.html

FACULTY: Shafer (Graduate Director) and Walker

Degree Granted: Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The Graduate Certificate in ELL Education and the M.Ed. in ELL Education are designed to provide licensed teachers and other professionals with in-depth and specialized knowledge in teaching K-12 and adult English language learners in the U.S. and abroad. Both programs are offered on-line; on-campus options are also available. Both programs require a field experience. Note: K-12 licensure is not required for admission; however, these programs do not lead to initial teacher licensure, which is required for North Dakota ELL teacher endorsement. Educators from other states seeking ELL teacher endorsement should check to determine whether the Graduate Certificate program or the Masters degree program best meets their state requirements.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Mission Statement and Program Goals

ELL teachers and other TESOL professionals who work with English Language Learners require specialized linguistic, socio-cultural, and pedagogical knowledge in order to provide effective instruction and assessment in the ELL classroom. The ELL teacher’s role, however, extends beyond the ELL classroom, and our program prepares graduates to become collaborators, leaders and advocates in the field of TESOL education. Flexibility in course assignments allows individuals to pursue their own scholarly interests in the field.

By the end of the program:

  1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the English language required for teaching ELLs.
  2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of how people acquire and/or learn languages.
  3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of models, strategies, methods and assessments for English acquisition in the four language domains.
  4. The student will demonstrate knowledge of U.S. and global issues and challenges in ELL education.

The program is offered entirely on-line. Note: Licensure is not required for admission; however, these programs do not lead to initial teacher licensure, which is required for North Dakota ELL teacher endorsement. Educators from other states seeking ELL teacher endorsement should check to determine whether the Graduate Certificate program or the Master’s degree program best meets their state requirements.

A variety of federal financial aid programs, including TEACH grants, are available for candidates who plan to work as ELL teachers in high needs schools in the United States.

Education: General Studies

http://www.und.edu/dept/efr/generalstudies.html

FACULTY: Anderson, Holen (Graduate Director), Gershman, Helgeson, Hung, Hunter, Ingwalson, Lemire, Pearson, Rocha, Smart, Weaver-Hightower and Zidon

Degree Granted: Master of Science (M.S.)

This M.S. degree program (thesis and non-thesis) is designed for both the licensed secondary or middle level teacher who seeks a major in education with a cognate or a minor in another field (Track I), or for those who wish to pursue a graduate degree in education that broadly will inform their own professional practice (Track II). Track I requires a teaching license; Track II does not require, nor does it lead to, teacher licensure.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Mission Statement

The General Studies program Track I is dedicated to educating the classroom teacher in educational philosophies and theories of curriculum, pedagogy and learners. The program is committed to the professional development of teachers who are lifelong learners, who value diversity, promote the learning of all students, use effective instructional practice and assessment, and systematically reflect on their practice in order to support learners and their learning.

The General Studies program Track II is dedicated to the pursuit of education as field of study. Historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, and psychological aspects of education are viewed through multiple perspectives of culture, gender, community and organizations. The program is committed to the development of professionals who value lifelong learning, diversity, inquiry and critical thinking.

Program Goals

The program goals for the Track I and Track II emphasis areas are designed to expand your awareness of philosophical, social and historical education issues, to enhance your understanding of curriculum and to promote your research knowledge and skills. The Track I emphasis area adds one more goal: to study and utilize various instructional and assessment strategies.

In this program you will:

  • Explore and understand the historical, philosophical, sociological, and psychological foundations of education, schooling and curriculum.
  • Study current learning theories, instructional principles, and curriculum development principles.
  • Demonstrate awareness of individual differences in learning needs, cultural heritage, economics, ability/disability, religion, and gender.
  • Develop competencies in accordance with North Dakota ESPB Standards and the National Board Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS)
  • Learn to design, develop, implement and evaluate curriculum.
  • Collaborate with other professionals to consider learning theory and practice.
  • Acquire knowledge, skills and dispositions for understanding and conducting educational research.
  • Study current trends in assessment design and practices.
  • Use learning technology to improve instructional content and delivery.

Higher Education

http://www.und.edu/dept/edl/he.html

FACULTY:  Healy (Graduate Director), Rice, Sun, Worley

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

This major incorporates the examination of the governance, organization, and administration of colleges and universities; internal and external factors leading to student access, development, and success; evaluation and assessment of students, programs, institutions, and systems; and ethical and historical implications of the higher education enterprise.

Mission Statement 

The academic mission is to prepare and support students through a community of diverse learners in their development as scholar-practitioners, who seek positions in postsecondary educational organizations or governmental agencies. Accordingly, the proposed graduate studies in Higher Education will enable students to engage actively in the critical reflection and ethical decision-making about current issues and problems in higher education. To achieve those learning experiences, the faculty have identified three learning goals and several corresponding learning objectives for students of this major.

Program Goals

Learning Goal 1: Students will display intellectual and professional curiosity in pursuit of knowledge and learning. Accordingly, students will be able to:

  • articulate a general understanding of higher education as a field of study.
  • develop, deliver, and assess courses and educational programs that are grounded in current research and best practice on learning, course and program design, and assessment.
  • design and/or modify academic and co-curricular programs and policies to respond to the differences in student characteristics and developmental needs.
  • demonstrate the basic leadership skills of developing a vision, engaging others in the vision, and executing a plan to achieve the vision.

Learning Goal 2: Students will communicate in both written and oral presentation form with a scholar-practitioner frame. Accordingly, students will be able to: 

  • demonstrate sound research design and familiarity with quantitative and qualitative methodologies.
  • integrate information, theory and research with the student’s own perspective and voice.
  • apply theory to practice in order to demonstrate how organizations, culture and environment influence and shape student behavior.
  • analyze a situation, identify the key players and decision-makers, develop networks of support, and prepare compelling and convincing arguments.

Learning Goal 3: Students will demonstrate capacity to express multiple perspectives and values among multiple constituents so they may maneuver through the enterprise, profession, and individual pursuits. Accordingly, students will be able to:

  • define the philosophical and historical context of current issues and problems in higher education.
  • identify and understand cultural elements and artifacts for students, faculty, administrators, and policy-makers and how they impact the higher education experience.
  • demonstrate a commitment to diversity and social justice by understanding the backgrounds and histories of individuals.
  • promote multicultural competence in students, faculty, staff, administrators, and policy-makers. 

Instructional Design and Technology

http://idt.und.edu

FACULTY: Borysewicz, Grabe, W. Hung (Graduate Director) and Van Eck

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Education (M.Ed.) and Graduate Certificates

The Instructional Design and Technology (IDT) program is a collaboration between the College of Education and Human Development, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. The designers believe the program benefits from the expertise of a diverse faculty, the various resources of the different organizational units, and a collaborative decision-making structure among the three units. The IDT program is administered through the College of Education and Human Development (EHD) and follows the IDT, EHD, UND, UND School of Graduate Studies, and NDUS rules and policies. The IDT program currently offers a Master of Science, a Master of Education, a Certificate in K-12 Technology Integration, a Certificate in eLearning, and a Certificate in Corporate Training and Performance. IDT also offers a doctorate through the Teaching and Learning Ph.D. program, in which IDT is an area of emphasis (see Teaching and Learning in the graduate catalog).

The IDT master’s and certificate programs are available for on-campus and distance delivery, making it possible to attain these degrees via distance delivery, on-campus attendances, or a combination of both. Online students and on-campus students are peers in the same class sessions and experience the same educational opportunities. Courses typically have a few synchronous (live) class sessions, where students may attend on-campus in the actual classroom or they may participate through our distance delivery system. In this manner, class lectures, discussion, presentation, and collaboration are done seamlessly, in a nearly identical fashion to traditional classes.

Asynchronous sessions (those done at the time and place of the students’ choosing each week) are handled through a course management system. Students use these tools to read material loaded by the teacher, turn in assignments, communicate through message boards, participate in discussions through threaded discussion tools, take tests, and receive their grades. There are assignments and participation activities every week, whether the class meets live or not. In this way, students get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of online learning and the personal contact and connection of face-to-face instruction.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements, and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (MS)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The primary mission of the Instructional Design and Technology (IDT) program is to prepare graduates for service in education, business, government, and industry who will enhance instruction and learning through the use of instructional design and technology. Graduates will be able to design curriculum, training, and human performance solutions using any medium and for any subject area, environment, or learner. Graduates of the doctoral program will be qualified to work as university faculty in IDT.

The Master of Science (MS) degree is primarily intended for students who plan to work in business, government, and industry developing and delivering technologically supported curriculum and/or solving human performance problems. This degree is available in two tracks. The MS (thesis option) is intended for those students who want to develop and utilize research skills, (e.g., for work in academic environments where research is encouraged). The MS (scholarly project option) is intended for those students who prefer to emphasize the development and evaluation of instructional materials.

Master of Education (MEd)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The primary mission of the IDT program is to prepare graduates for service in education, business, government, and industry who will enhance instruction and learning through the use of IDT. These graduates will be able to design curriculum, training, and human performance solutions using any medium, and for any subject area, environment, or learner.

The Master of Education (MEd) degree is primarily intended for students who plan to work in an education environment, including K-12 schools and higher education. Individuals pursuing this degree will work primarily as technology facilitators or curriculum design specialists. As technology facilitators, they are likely to work with instructors in assisting them to appropriately, effectively, and successfully integrate technology into their instruction. They are also likely to do some direct work with students in teaching skills associated with technology integration. As curriculum design specialists, they are likely to work at the school, district, or state levels to design curriculum for public education. Students pursuing this degree will learn the theoretical issues associated with technologically supported instruction but their emphasis will be in the application of this knowledge in terms of best practices. A scholarly project is required and is considered a capstone experience. The scholarly project must address a real-world, practical instructional design learning or performance problem and fully employ an instructional design or human performance technology model to the solution of that problem or address a theoretical construct in the same way that a thesis does.

Reading Education

http://www.und.edu/dept/tl/html/reading/index.html

FACULTY: Barrentine (Graduate Director), Beck, Combs and Walker

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.) and Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The Reading Education programs are designed for educators or other professionals interested in the study of individual readers and writers, reading/language arts instruction in the classroom and/or in the reading specialist setting, reading/language arts curriculum and assessment. A unique feature of these programs is that students become engaged in teaching literacy in a supervised practicum experience. With careful planning, licensed teachers can take course work that meets the requirements for obtaining the North Dakota Reading Credential.

Certified teachers with a bachelor’s degree in education may pursue either the Master of Education or the Master of Science. Non-certified individuals who have earned a bachelor’s degree in a field of study other than education may only pursue the Master of Science.

The Reading Education programs are administered through the Department of Teaching & Learning in the College of Education and Human Development (EHD) and the UND School of Graduate Studies. The programs follow the policies of Reading Education, the Department of Teaching & Learning, EHD, UND, UND School of Graduate Studies, and NDUS. The Reading programs are approved by the North Dakota Education Standards and Practices Board.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Master of Science, Reading Education program prepares literacy specialists and classroom teachers in reading/language arts and leadership. Graduates possess specialized knowledge about how to work with readers who have diverse needs. Systematic reflection on instruction and assessment practice that aims to promote reading development for all learners is emphasized. Students in the program will:

  • Learn to use the foundations of literacy to create a literate environment for literacy learning by diverse learners in a variety of literacy learning settings.
  • Gain knowledge of literacy curriculum that is learner and literature based.
  • Learn to use constructivist assessments and instructional practices in a variety of literacy learning settings, e.g., Title I classroom.
  • Understand methods to assess, diagnose, and evaluate readers and writers.
  • Use systematic study of practice to lead positive changes in literacy teaching and learning.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Master of Education, Reading Education program prepares teachers in reading/language arts. Graduates are equipped to become life-long learners in the field of literacy education, understand and respect diverse readers, promote the learning of all students, use effective instructional practice and assessment, and systematically reflect on their practice to advance literacy achievements for their students. Students in the program will:

  • Learn to use the foundations of literacy to create a literate environment for literacy learning by diverse learners in the classroom.
  • Gain knowledge of literacy curriculum that is learner and literature based.
  • Learn to use constructivist assessment and instructional practices in the classroom.
  • View professional development in literacy education as a career-long responsibility of the classroom teacher.

Special Education

http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/tl/specialed/

FACULTY: Borgeson, Chalmers, Chiasson, Grave, Jacobson, Johnson, Lee, Mahar and Terras

Degrees Granted: Master of Science (M.S.) and Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The Special Education Program offers graduate coursework leading to a Master of Science or Master of Education degree in Special Education in the specialization areas of: Developmental/Cognitive Disabilities; Early Childhood; Emotional Disturbance; Learning Disabilities; Strategist; Visual Impairment; and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

The Special Education programs are designed for educators or other professionals interested in the study of children, adolescents, and/or adults with disabilities. Certified teachers with a bachelor’s degree in any area of education may pursue either the Master of Education or the Master of Science in any of the specialization areas. The Master of Education degrees have a foundation of education focus, whereas the Master of Science degrees have an assessment and research focus. Non-certified individuals who have earned a bachelor’s degree in a field of study other than education may only pursue the Master of Science. The Special Education programs are administered through the Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education and Human Development (EHD) and the UND School of Graduate Studies.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Master of Science (M.S.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

The Special Education faculty at the University of North Dakota believe that all children can learn. Thus, our mission is to provide the best preparation for students who aim to become special educators in schools, hospitals, state and private institutions, and other human service agencies.

Through this program, you will:

  • Learn concepts, practices, and approaches that benefit children/young adults with disabilities.
  • Become familiar with issues, trends, and research in the field of special education.
  • Be encouraged to have an inquiring and questioning attitude toward your profession.
  • Become conversant with the literature of the field and be encouraged to be a lifelong learner.

Degrees Offered

There are two types of degree programs and one certificate program available. The certificate program is composed of 12 credits and is offered in the area of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The degree programs include the Master of Science (M.S.) and the Master of Education (M.Ed.). Certified teachers with a bachelor’s degree in education may pursue either the Master of Education or the Master of Science. Non-certified individuals who have earned a bachelor’s degree in a field of study other than education may only pursue the Master of Science. The Master of Science degree has an assessment and scholarly writing focus, whereas the Master of Education has a focus on the foundations of education.

Teaching and Learning

http://education.und.edu/teaching-and-learning/

FACULTY: Baker (Chair), Barrentine, Beck, Borgeson, Borysewicz, Burris, Chalmers, Chiasson, Combs, Gallo, Gourneau, Grabe, Grave, Guy, Helgeson, W. Hung, Ingwalson, Jacobson, Johnson, Keengwe, Lee, Mahar, Olsen, Olson, Onchwari, Ozaki, Pearson, Salyers, Shafer, Smart, Terras, Van Eck, Walker, Yearwood and Zidon

Graduate Programs Offered in the Department of Teaching and Learning

Doctoral Programs
Teaching and Learning Ed.D., Ph.D.
Masters and Certificate Programs
Early Childhood Education M.S.
Education-General Studies M.S.
Elementary Education M.Ed., M.S.
English Language Learner Education (TESOL) M.Ed.
Certificate
Reading Education M.Ed., M.S.
Special Education M.Ed., M.S.
Certificate (ASD)
Instructional Design and Technology M.Ed., M.S.
Certificate

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs are designed to prepare persons for leadership in the public schools or other educational agencies and for teaching and administration in colleges or universities. Study at the doctoral level requires that the student demonstrate analytic inquiry and creative scholarship in the study of education. The Ed.D. program focuses on study of professional practice and requires completion of independent work leading to an original dissertation with implications for the practice of education. The Ph.D. program emphasizes educational research and requires completion of independent work leading to an original dissertation focused on educational theory. Refer to the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog for delineation of requirements for the Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) focuses graduate study on professional practice from a broad educational perspective and admits only licensed educators. The M.Ed. program requires completion of a final research paper or special project to culminate degree study. Refer to the Degree Requirements section of this catalog for a discussion of M.Ed. requirements.

The Master of Science (M.S.) degrees offered in education admit students who are licensed educators and others interested in the study of education. Degree requirements vary according to the background of the student and are described in the section devoted to each program. M.S. programs are available with thesis and non-thesis options.

Certificate programs augment skills in an area. Degree seeking students may simultaneously be enrolled in a degree and certificate program, although the certificate requirements are over and beyond the credits for the graduate degree.

For a complete picture of each degree program, the student is advised to read sections discussing the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies referenced in the paragraphs above, the requirements of each program in the following section, and the graduate handbooks available from the department of Teaching and Learning.

Degrees Granted: Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) programs in Teaching and Learning are designed to prepare individuals for leadership and teaching positions in schools, colleges and universities, and public or private agencies. The doctoral program in Teaching and Learning offers three areas of emphasis:

  • Higher Education (preparation to be a college or university professor of an academic discipline and all of its responsibilities).
  • Teacher Education (preparation to be an educator of teachers in a college or university setting and/or as a person providing consultation and in-service to teachers in pre-K-12 schools).
  • Instructional Design and Technology (preparation to be researchers and scholars. The focus is on understanding various areas in instructional design, human learning, and the integration of technology).

Coursework for all areas of emphasis is offered by faculty from the department of Teaching and Learning. Faculty members are able to serve as advisors to doctoral students.

Students are specifically admitted to the Ed.D. or the Ph.D. program.

  • The Ed.D. degree emphasizes professional practice and educational foundations and theory.
  • The Ph.D. degree emphasizes research, creative scholarship, and educational theory.

The doctoral student and advisory committee design the doctoral program of study to meet individual needs within the framework of guidelines set by the School of Graduate Studies and by the program faculty. School of Graduate Studies requirements for the Ph.D. and the Ed.D. are stated in the Degree Requirements section.

Details pertaining to admission requirements, degree requirements and courses offered can be found in the Degree section.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

It is the mission of the Teaching and Learning Doctoral Program to prepare persons for leadership and teaching positions in schools, colleges or universities, and public or private agencies.

Goal 1: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how personal educational practice guides and supports the learning of others.

Goal 2: The student will demonstrate the ability to apply research and research methods relevant to the field of study.

Goal 3: The student will demonstrate knowledge and application of educational practices related to the foundations (personal, historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, psychological, and/multicultural) for learning and teaching.

Goal 4: The student will demonstrate knowledge and skills in understanding ways of engaging learners in the active construction of knowledge relevant to the advanced discipline of study.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Mission Statement and Program Goals

It is the mission of the Teaching and Learning Doctoral Program to prepare persons for leadership and teaching positions in schools, colleges or universities, and public or private agencies.

Goal 1: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how personal educational practice guides and supports the learning of others.

Goal 2: The student will demonstrate the ability to apply research and research methods relevant to the field of study.

Goal 3: The student will demonstrate knowledge and application of educational practices related to the foundations (personal, historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, psychological, and/multicultural) for learning and teaching.

Goal 4: The student will demonstrate knowledge and skills in understanding ways of engaging learners in the active construction of knowledge relevant to the advanced discipline of study.

 

Educational Foundations and Research

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

Students with a master’s degree in a field unrelated to Education are eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program.

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Important dates:

For admission in the Fall semester, please send your complete application materials by February 15; you will be advised of our decision by April 15. For admission in the Spring semester, please send your application materials by October 1; you will be advised of our decision by December 1.

International students should be aware that the School of Graduate Studies at the University of North Dakota does not recognize master’s degrees from institutions outside of the United States or Canada. Students must satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Application materials should include:

  1. Transcripts showing a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
  2. Transcripts showing a graduate degree from an accredited college or university
  3. Graduate GPA of 3.5 and above
  4. Three letters of reference
  5. An essay that responds to questions provided in the application
  6. A resume and a writing sample of 10-15 pages (separate from #5 above). Your writing sample should demonstrate the best of your intellectual abilities and/or creative work.
  7. Optional: scores from the GRE exam, the Advanced GRE, or the Miller’s Analogy Test.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies for the Ph.D., as well as the following:

  1. A minimum of 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree
  2. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, 30 credits from a master’s degree from an accredited institution will be applied to the doctoral program of study
  3. Maintenance of a minimum of 3.0 GPA
  4. Educational Foundations credit hours of 21 or 9 (depending on the emphasis)
  5. Research Methodologies credit hours of 21 or 9 (depending on the emphasis)
  6. A cognate of 12-15 credits
  7. A dissertation of 15 credits
  8. The following course requirements:

Foundations of Education Emphasis

Select seven of the following:21
Foundations of Educational Thought
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Multicultural Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
International and Comparative Education
Select three of the following (Research):9
Introduction to Educational Research
Qualitative Research Methods
Program Evaluation
Educational Tests and Measurements
Computer Applications in Educational Statistics
Discourse Analysis
Statistics I
Statistics II
Advanced Research Methodologies
Multivariate Analysis
Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Mixed-Methods Research
Needs Assessment
Special Topics in Education
Individual Research in Education
Historiography
Total Credits30

Research Methodologies Emphasis

Select seven of the following:21
Introduction to Educational Research
Qualitative Research Methods
Program Evaluation
Educational Tests and Measurements
Computer Applications in Educational Statistics
Discourse Analysis
Statistics I
Statistics II
Advanced Research Methodologies
Multivariate Analysis
Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Mixed-Methods Research
Special Topics in Education
Individual Research in Education
Historiography
Select three of the following (Foundations):9
Foundations of Educational Thought
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Multicultural Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
International and Comparative Education
Special Topics in Education
Readings in Education
Total Credits30

 

Educational Leadership 

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Admission Requirements

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. A cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or at least 3.00 for the last two years.
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  4. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.
  5. All applicants are required to respond to essay questions provided in the application, and submit a resume and a writing sample.
  6. All PK-12 applicants are required to submit to a background check.
  7. All PK-12 applicants are required to have a teaching credential. Typically, teaching experience beyond student teaching in PK-12 schools is required.

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty-four (34) credits at or above the 500 level.
  2. At least 12 credits, including 2 for the EDL 997 Independent Study, must be in a single field or area of concentration.
  3. At least 6 credits must be in an area or areas of concentration (major).
  4. At least 6 credits must be in Educational Foundations and Research.
  5. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  6. Preparation of a written Independent Study approved by the faculty advisor.

M.Ed. Degree (PK-12 Emphasis)

Required Courses
EDL 501Leadership and Organizational Behavior3
EDL 503Seminar Educational Leadership1-3
EDL 511Effective Administrative Communications3
EDL 513Leading Curriculum and Learning3
EDL 514Supervision and Staff Development3
EDL 515Education Law and Ethics3
EDL 516Education Finance and Policy3
EDL 519Principalship2
EDL 529Special Education Law3
Select one of the following:1
Middle School Principal Field Study
Elementary Principal Field Study
Secondary Principal Field Study
Select one of the following:1-3
Administration of Elementary School Curriculum
Administration of Middle School Curriculum
Administration of Secondary School Curriculum
Independent Study
Research and Foundations/Cognate
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
Electives3
Total Credits35-39

 

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Admission Requirements

The following criteria will be used to assess a student’s application for admission into the doctoral programs in the Department of Educational Leadership. No single criterion can adequately predict a student’s probable success in graduate work; as such, candidates for admission to the doctoral programs are evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Completion of a master’s degree from an accredited college or university
  2. Grade point average from all previous graduate work (minimum of 3.5 required)
  3. Professional resume
  4. Educational leadership essay
  5. Statement of professional goals
  6. Writing sample
  7. Three (3) letters of recommendation
  8. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the Graduate Catalog.
  9. Interview. Applicants who successfully meet all the above requirements will be interviewed by members of the T&L Admissions Committee, either face-to-face on campus or via a synchronous online format. Final admission decisions will be based on the interview.
  10. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.
  11. All PK-12 applicants are required to have a teaching credential, three years of teaching experience, and administrative experience in PK-12 environments.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Education degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Educational Leadership Department.

The Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership is designed primarily for practitioners preparing for school administration positions including elementary or secondary principalships, superintendencies, curriculum directorships, or other school district central office positions. Upon completion of the Ed.D. degree, a student generally will have completed the requirements for an administrative credential, including those required for the position of school superintendent in North Dakota.

  1. A minimum of 96 semester credit hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of a dissertation, which incorporates independent work that is an original contribution to knowledge.
  4. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to 30 credits from a master’s degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations in Educational Leadership and Educational Foundations.
  6. Successful completion of a final examination.
Educational Leadership Core Courses *
For PK-12 emphasis:
EDL 501Leadership and Organizational Behavior3
EDL 511Effective Administrative Communications3
EDL 513Leading Curriculum and Learning3
EDL 514Supervision and Staff Development3
EDL 515Education Law and Ethics3
EDL 516Education Finance and Policy3
Doctoral Core Courses
EDL 503Seminar Educational Leadership1-4
EDL 572Educational Systems and Planning2
EDL 573Administration and Organizational Behavior I3
EDL 575Education and Public Policy3
EDL 579Special Topics in Educational Leadership12
Educational Leadership PK-12
EDL 523The Educational Plant3
EDL 524Educational Personnel Administration2
EDL 526Business Management in Education2
EDL 527Legal Issues in Education3
EDL 529Special Education Law3
EDL 531School District Leadership2
EDL 532Staff and Program Evaluation2
EDL 571School Community Relations2
Foundations of Education
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Select three of the following:9
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Multicultural Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
Cognate Area(s)
One or two cognate areas outside Educational Leadership and often outside the field of Education to support the area of emphasis.12-24
Scholarly Tools
Select from approved courses that provide the scholarly tools to support educational research ***6
Internship
EDL 593Internship in Educational Leadership ****1-8
Dissertation
EDL 999Dissertation10
Total Credits99-121

 

*

If the Master’s degree or Specialist Diploma did not include these courses or their equivalent, they must be completed as soon as possible after admission to the Ed.D. program.

**

As appropriate, elective courses are selected from one of the following areas of emphasis to fulfill individual needs and goals in consultation with a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee. A minimum of 30 credits of Educational Leadership courses is required. A concentration of 48 credits in the major is required (including Educational Leadership courses, scholarly tools and dissertation).

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Leadership and General Administration
  • Management of Resources
***

EFR 515 Statistics I (or its equivalent) may not be used to fulfill Scholarly Tools.

****

Not required but often advisable, depending upon student experience and goals and these credits are reported in your major.

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The following criteria will be used to assess a student’s application for admission into the doctoral programs in the Department of Educational Leadership. No single criterion can adequately predict a student’s probable success in graduate work; as such, candidates for admission to the doctoral programs are evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Completion of a master’s degree from an accredited college or university
  2. Grade point average from all previous graduate work (minimum of 3.5 required)
  3. Professional resume
  4. Educational leadership essay
  5. Statement of professional goals
  6. Writing sample
  7. Three (3) letters of recommendation
  8. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  9. Interview. Applicants who successfully meet all the above requirements will be interviewed by members of the T&L Admissions Committee, either face-to-face on campus or via a synchronous online format. Final admission decisions will be based on the interview.
  10. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.
  11. All PK-12 applicants are required to have a teaching credential, three years of teaching experience, and administrative experience in PK-12 environments.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Educational Leadership Department.

The Ph.D. program in Educational Leadership is designed for students preparing for positions in which research and creative experience are predominant interests. Ph.D. candidates are expected to have undertaken and completed independent research leading to an original contribution of knowledge in the field. It is generally expected that the Ph.D. dissertation will be publishable. This degree option typically provides preparation for those who aspire to leadership positions in higher education, in government agencies, or in other educational policy organizations.

  1. A minimum of 90 semester credit hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of a dissertation, which incorporates independent work that is an original contribution to knowledge.
  4. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to 30 credits from a master’s degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations in Educational Leadership and Educational Research.
  6. Successful completion of a final examination.
Educational Leadership Core Courses *
For PK-12 emphasis:
EDL 501Leadership and Organizational Behavior3
EDL 511Effective Administrative Communications3
EDL 513Leading Curriculum and Learning3
EDL 514Supervision and Staff Development3
EDL 515Education Law and Ethics3
EDL 516Education Finance and Policy3
Doctoral Core Courses
EDL 503Seminar Educational Leadership1-4
EDL 572Educational Systems and Planning2
EDL 573Administration and Organizational Behavior I3
EDL 575Education and Public Policy3
EDL 579Special Topics in Educational Leadership12
Educational Leadership PK-12
EDL 523The Educational Plant3
EDL 524Educational Personnel Administration2
EDL 526Business Management in Education2
EDL 527Legal Issues in Education3
EDL 529Special Education Law3
EDL 531School District Leadership2
EDL 532Staff and Program Evaluation2
EDL 571School Community Relations2
**
Foundations of Education
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Select one of the following:3
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Multicultural Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
Cognate Area(s)
One or two cognate areas or one minor area outside Educational Leadership and often outside the field of Education to support the area of emphasis.12-24
Scholarly Tools
Select from approved courses that provide the scholarly tools to support educational research ***9
Internship
EDL 593Internship in Educational Leadership ****1-8
Dissertation
EDL 999Dissertation12
Total Credits98-120

 

*

If the Master’s degree or Specialist Diploma did not include these courses or their equivalent, they must be completed as soon as possible after admission to the Ph.D. program.

**

As appropriate, elective courses are selected from one of the following areas to fulfill individual needs and goals in consultation with a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee. A minimum of 30 credits of Educational Leadership courses is required. A concentration of 48 credits in the major (including Foundations and Educational Leadership courses, scholarly tools courses and a dissertation) is required.

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Leadership and General Administration
  • Management of Resources
***

EFR 515 Statistics I (or its equivalent) may not be used to fulfill Scholarly Tools.

****

Not required but is often advisable, depending upon student experience and goals, and these credits are reported in your major.

 

Specialist Diploma (Spec.Dip.)

The Specialist Diploma, available at UND only in Educational Leadership, is designed for students preparing for school administrative positions. This course of study is usually considered to be a terminal program of advanced preparation for professional practice. Upon completion of the Specialist Diploma, a student generally will have completed the requirements for an administrative credential, including those required for the position of school superintendent in North Dakota.

A MINIMUM OF 64 SEMESTER HOURS OF COURSE WORK BEYOND THE BACHELOR’S DEGREE IS REQUIRED FOR THE SPECIALIST DIPLOMA. THE SPECIALIST DIPLOMA MUST INCLUDE APPROXIMATELY 30 CREDITS BEYOND THE MASTER’S DEGREE.

Required Courses in General and Building Level Administration *
EDL 501Leadership and Organizational Behavior3
EDL 503Seminar Educational Leadership1-4
EDL 511Effective Administrative Communications3
EDL 513Leading Curriculum and Learning3
EDL 514Supervision and Staff Development3
EDL 515Education Law and Ethics3
EDL 516Education Finance and Policy3
EDL 519
  & EDL 520
Principalship
   and Middle School Principal Field Study
3
or EDL 521 Elementary Principal Field Study
or EDL 522 Secondary Principal Field Study
EDL 535Administration of Elementary School Curriculum1-3
EDL 536Administration of Middle School Curriculum1-3
EDL 537Administration of Secondary School Curriculum1-3
Required Courses in District Level Administration with a master’s degree in administration **
EDL 523The Educational Plant3
EDL 524Educational Personnel Administration2
EDL 526Business Management in Education2
EDL 527Legal Issues in Education3
EDL 571School Community Relations2
Foundations
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Select one of the following:3
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Multicultural Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
Cognate Area(s)
A minimum of 12 credits (to a maximum of 24 credits) of course work must be in one or two cognate areas outside Educational Leadership and may be outside the field of Education. The cognate area(s) serve to support the area of emphasis.12-24
Research Methods
Select from approved courses that provide the scholarly tools to support research3
Internship
EDL 593Internship in Educational Leadership ***1-8
Independent Study
EDL 997Independent Study4
Total Credits63-91

 

*

These required courses include practicum in each class.

**

As appropriate, elective courses are selected from one of the following areas to fulfill individual needs and goals in consultation with the Faculty Advisory Committee. A minimum of 20 credits of Educational Leadership courses is required. A concentration of 40 credits in the major (including Foundations and Educational Leadership courses and an Independent Study) is required.

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Leadership and General Administration
  • Management of Resources
***

Not required but is often advisable, depending upon student experience and goals.

 

Early Childhood Education

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. An undergraduate degree in early childhood education, child development, elementary education, or a related field.
  2. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A = 4.00).
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  4. Transcripts, recommendations for admission, and a personal statement, i.e., a response to three essay prompts, are part of the School of Graduate Studies and Early Childhood Education application procedure. The personal statement essay should be 2-3 pages in length and the prompts are:
    1. What have you already done professionally or personally of which you are proud? Please include a chronological history of all professional teaching and administration experience, as well as academic honors or achievements you earned.
    2. What are the characteristics, attitudes, values, and/or skills that you think will make you a good candidate for your professional role?
    3. Describe several personal and professional goals you would like to achieve in the next five years. Include in your description reasons why these goals are important to you.

Degree Requirements

The M.S. degree in Early Childhood Education is available in two options: non-thesis option and the thesis option. The program of study is developed together with the student’s advisor (non-thesis option, 32 credits) or with a student’s thesis committee (thesis option, 30 credits).

Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Thirty-two credits including credits required for the major.
  2. A minimum of two credits of T&L 997 Independent Study, or T&L 995 Scholarly Project.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  4. At least one-half of the credits must be above the 500 level.
  5. The program may include just the major, the major and the minor, or the major and a cognate area. The major must include 20 credits from the major department and the minor or cognate must include nine credits.
  6. Completion of a two-credit practicum (60 hours) in an early childhood setting.
  7. Preparation of a written independent study approved by the faculty advisor.

Thesis Option:

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to a 4-6-credit T&L 998 Thesis.
  2. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be above the 500 level.
  4. The program may include just the major, the major and a minor, or the major and a cognate area. The major must include 20 credits from the major department and a minor or cognate must include nine credits.
  5. Preparation and successful defense of a thesis.

This program of graduate study can be completed in 18 months going full-time or 24 months going part-time (two courses per semester). Courses are offered on campus, online and a combination of the two.

Required Courses:

Major
SPED 510Early Intervention for Children with Special Needs2
T&L 526Play in Development and Early Childhood Education3
T&L 527Curricular Foundations in Early Childhood Education3
T&L 529Language Development & Cognition in Children3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 553Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community3
T&L 580Practicum in Schools2
T&L 997Independent Study2
Scholarly Tools
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
T&L 569Action Research3
Electives
The student will choose electives in consultation with his/her adviser.5
Total Credits32

Students are required to take T&L 580 Practicum in Schools. This practicum requires 60 hours in an early childhood setting, which could be the candidate’s work setting if it meets required accreditation standards.

 

Elementary Education

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. Teacher Licensure or a baccalaureate degree
  2. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A= 4.00).
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Refer to the Admissions section of the graduate catalog for additional information on admission requirements and application procedures.

Degree Requirements

Degree requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Elementary Education include:

A detailed description of the M.S. degree may be found in the Degree Requirements section. Scholarly tool requirements are described in the Education departmental section.

The Master of Science Degree in Elementary Education is available in two tracks. Track I, either thesis or non-thesis, is open to licensed or non-licensed persons who wish to follow a research-oriented program of study. Track I requires a minimum of five credits of scholarly tool coursework and allows a maximum three credits of readings.

Track II, available only in the non-thesis option, provides opportunity for non-licensed persons to study Elementary Education at the graduate level. Track II requires a minimum of six credits of coursework in Foundations of Education.

Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Thirty-two (32) credits including credits required for the major.
  2. A minimum of three credits of Independent Study
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  4. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Preparation of a written independent study approved by the faculty advisor.

Thesis Option:

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.

Required Courses for the Master of Science

Major: Elementary Education (Track I)

Required Core
T&L 518Science in the Elementary School3
T&L 519Social Studies in the Elementary School3
T&L 522Mathematics in the Elementary School3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 580Practicum in Schools1-4
Electives
Depends on thesis or non-thesis option3-9
Scholarly Tools
T&L 569Action Research3
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
Other Required Coursework
T&L 995Scholarly Project2-6
or T&L 997 Independent Study
or T&L 998 Thesis
Total Credits24-37

Major: Elementary Education (Track II)

Required Core Courses
T&L 518Science in the Elementary School3
T&L 519Social Studies in the Elementary School3
T&L 522Mathematics in the Elementary School3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 580Practicum in Schools1-4
Electives
Depends on thesis or non-thesis option3-9
Foundations
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
EFR Elective3
Other Required Coursework
T&L 995Scholarly Project2-6
or T&L 997 Independent Study
or T&L 998 Thesis
Total Credits24-37

 

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. Teacher Licensure
  2. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A= 4.00).
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Refer to the Admissions section of the graduate catalog for additional information on admission requirements and application procedures.

Degree Requirements

Licensed persons are eligible for the Master of Education degree. The major portion of the program includes coursework that addresses practical aspects of teaching at the elementary school level—literacy development, mathematics, science, social studies, curriculum development, and working with families. Available courses focus on the relationship between theories of child development and educational practices designed to foster that development. The program culminates in a final paper, project, or thesis.

Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Thirty-two (32) credits including credits required for the major.
  2. A minimum of three credits of Independent Study
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  4. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Preparation of a written independent study approved by the faculty advisor.

Thesis Option:

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.

Required Courses for the Master of Education

Major: Elementary Education

Required Core Courses
T&L 518Science in the Elementary School3
T&L 519Social Studies in the Elementary School3
T&L 522Mathematics in the Elementary School3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 580Practicum in Schools1-4
Cognate
T&L 569Action Research (Recommended)3
Elective3
Foundations
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
EFR Elective3
Other Required Coursework
T&L 995Scholarly Project2-6
or T&L 997 Independent Study
or T&L 998 Thesis
Electives3
Total Credits30-37

English Language Learners (TESOL)

 

Master of Education in ELL Education (M.Ed.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, or a related field.
  2. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A = 4.00).
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  4. Students currently enrolled in UND’s Graduate Certificate in ELL Program who want to transfer to the M.Ed. in ELL Education program must apply for admission to the M.Ed. program. Students who have completed the Graduate Certificate have two years from the date of certificate completion to be apply and be accepted into the M.Ed. program and have their certificate courses credited towards the M.Ed. degree.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

This degree is the highest academic credential normally held by teachers in the TESOL field. While the program focuses on K-12 education in the United States, the program is also responsive to those planning to teach adult ESL or teach English overseas. The program may be completed in six semesters. A 90-hour field experience is required in addition to a final scholarly project or independent study.

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty-five (35) credits including a minimum of twelve in the major, six in a cognate area, and six in foundations.
  2. A minimum of two credits of Independent Study or Scholarly Project.
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500- level.
  4. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Preparation of a written independent study or scholarly project approved by the faculty advisor.
  6. Required Courses:
  7. Major
    T&L 522Mathematics in the Elementary School3
    T&L 523Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners3
    T&L 537ELL Methods and Materials3
    T&L 550Assessment and Evaluation in ELL Education3
    T&L 568Research and Advocacy in TESOL3
    T&L 580Practicum in Schools2
    T&L 995Scholarly Project2
    or T&L 997 Independent Study
    Cognate
    T&L 513Linguistics for ELL Teachers3
    T&L 567Language Structure and Analysis for ELL Teachers3
    T&L 551Second Language Acquisition for ELL Teachrs3
    Foundations
    EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
    EFR 506Multicultural Education3
    Total Credits34

Education: General Studies

 

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. A four-year bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university
  2. Teacher Licensure, or
  3. Minimum of 8 credit hours of social sciences/humanities
  4. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A=4.00)
  5. Three letters of recommendation that support you for graduate work
  6. Statement of Goals and Objectives (see below)
  7. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Statement of Goals and Objectives. As part of the application process, the applicant must respond to the following questions:

  1. Describe several personal and professional goals you would like to achieve in the next five years. Include in your description reasons why these goals are important to you.
  2. What are the characteristics, attitudes, values, and/or skills that you think will make you a good candidate for your professional role?
  3. What have you already done professionally or personally of which you are proud? Please include a chronological history of all professional teaching or administration experiences, as well as academic honors or achievements you have earned.

Degree Requirements

Track I (32 credits):

Foundations6
Scholarly Tools6
Curriculum and Instruction6
Scholarly Project or Independent Study2
Cognate or Minor9
Total Credits29

 

*

All coursework can also be taken in the major.

Track II (32 credits):

Foundations9
Scholarly Tools6
Curriculum and Instruction3
Scholarly Project or Independent Study2
Cognate or Minor9
Total Credits29

 

*

All coursework can also be taken in the major.

Thesis Option

  1. A minimum of 30 semester credits in a major field, including the credits granted for the thesis and the research leading to the thesis.
  2. A minimum of four credits and a maximum of six credits for the thesis.
  3. The program may include just the major, the major and a minor, or the major and a cognate area.
  4. Preparation of a written thesis is approved by a committee of three faculty. The student’s advisor chairs the committee.
  5. Presentation and defense of the thesis takes place before the final report is sent to the School of Graduate Studies.

Non-Thesis Option

  1. A minimum of 32 credits including credits required for the major.
  2. A minimum of two credits for the Independent Study or Scholarly Project.
  3. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500-level.
  4. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. The program may include just the major, the major and a minor, or the major and a cognate area.
  6. Preparation of a written independent study or scholarly project must be approved by the faculty advisor.
  7. Presentation of independent study or scholarly project takes place before the final report is sent to the School of Graduate Studies.

IDT 998 Thesis. 4 to 9 credits. The thesis is an original research project completed.

 

Higher Education

Master of Science (MS)

Admission Requirements

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. A cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or at least 3.00 for the last two years. Typically, applicants with teaching experience in schools apply to the M.Ed. program, not the M.S. program.
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the Graduate Catolog.
  4. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.
  5. All applicants are required to respond to essay questions provided in the application, submit a resume and writing sample.

Degree Requirements

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. A cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or at least 3.00 for the last two years. Typically, applicants with teaching experience in schools apply to the M.Ed. program, not the M.S. program.
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the Graduate Catolog.
  4. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.
  5. All applicants are required to respond to essay questions provided in the application, submit a resume and writing sample.

Required Courses:

Core Courses/Experiences:
HE 500Higher Education Orientation1
HE 501Introduction to Higher Education3
HE 503Diversity Across Higher Education3
HE 505The College Student3
Educational Foundations & Research:
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
T&L 541History of Higher Education in the United States3
Integrative Learning Experiences:
HE 529Capstone Seminar1
HE 997Independent Study2
Electives (Sampling of Potential Electives):
HE 507Collegiate Environments3
HE 509Higher Education Management3
HE 511Program Development3
HE 513College Students and the Law3
HE 592Internship in Higher Education1-8
Total Credits35-42

 

Doctor of Education (EdD) 

Admission Requirements

The following criteria will be used to assess a student’s application for admission into the doctoral programs in the Department of Educational Leadership. No single criterion can adequately predict a student’s probable success in graduate work; as such, candidates for admission to the  doctoral programs are evaluated on the following criteria:
  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. Completion of a master’s degree from an accredited college or university
  3. Grade point average from all previous graduate work (minimum of 3.5 required)
  4. Professional resume
  5. Educational leadership essay
  6. Statement of professional goals
  7. Writing sample
  8. Three (3) letters of recommendation
  9. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ Englsh Language Proficiency requirements as listed in the Graduate Academic Information section.
  10. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Education degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Educational Leadership Department.
The Ed.D. program in Higher Education is designed primarily for practitioners preparing for college and university administration positions. 
  1. A minimum of 96 semester credit hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of a dissertation, which incorporates independent work that is an original contribution to knowledge.
  4. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to 30 credits from a master’s degree may betransferred from another institution.
  5. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations in Educational Leadership and Educational Foundations and Research.
  6. Successful completion of a final examination.

Required Courses:

Minor/Master's transfer credits (30 credits)30
Higher Education Common Core (18 credits):
HE 530Orientation to Doctoral Study1
HE 532Principles and Practices in Higher Education3
HE 536Leading and Learning in Higher Education3
HE 538College Student Experiences3
HE 549Dissertation Orientation2
T&L 541History of Higher Education in the United States3
T&L 543Scholarly Writing3
Educational Foundations (12 credits):
Advanced Foundations elective 13
Advanced Foundations elective 23
Advanced Foundations elective 33
Advanced Foundations elective 43
Scholarly Tools (6 credits):
(Prerequsite: EFR 515 or equivalent)
EFR 510Qualitative Research Methods3
EFR 516Statistics II3
Administration Emphasis (20 credits):
Core (9 credits):
HE 563Academic Administration in Higher Education3
HE 570Higher Education Law3
HE 576Higher Education Planning and Finance3
Electives (11 credits):
Selected with consent of advisor11
OR
Individualized Emphasis (20 credits):
Electives selected with consent of advisor and faculty from area of specialization20
Dissertation10
Total Credits116

 

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Admission Requirements

The following criteria will be used to assess a student’s application for admission into the doctoral programs in the Department of Educational Leadership. No single criterion can adequately predict a student’s probable success in graduate work; as such, candidates for admission to the  doctoral programs are evaluated on the following criteria:
  1. Completion of a master’s degree from an accredited college or university
  2. Grade point average from all previous graduate work (minimum of 3.5 required)
  3. Professional resume
  4. Educational leadership essay
  5. Statement of professional goals
  6. Writing sample
  7. Three (3) letters of recommendation
  8. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  9. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Educational Leadership Department.
The Ph.D. program in Higher Education is designed for students preparing for positions in which research and creative experience are predominant interests. Ph.D. candidates are expected to have undertaken and completed independent research leading to an original contribution of knowledge in the field. It is generally expected that the Ph.D. dissertation will be publishable. This degree option typically provides preparation for those who aspire to leadership positions in higher education, in government agencies, or in other educational policy organizations.
  1. A minimum of 90 semester credit hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. Completion of a dissertation, which incorporates independent work that is anoriginal contribution to knowledge.
  4. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to 30 credits from a master’s degree may be transferred from another institution.
  5. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations in Educational Leadership and Educational Foundations and Research.
  6. Successful completion of a final examination. 
Minor/Master's transfer credits (24 credits)24
Higher Education Common Core (18 credits):
HE 530Orientation to Doctoral Study1
HE 532Principles and Practices in Higher Education3
HE 536Leading and Learning in Higher Education3
HE 538College Student Experiences3
HE 549Dissertation Orientation2
T&L 541History of Higher Education in the United States3
T&L 543Scholarly Writing3
Educational Foundations (6 credits):
(Prerequisite: EFR 500 or equivalent)
Advanced Foundations elective 13
Advanced Foundations elective 23
Scholarly Tools (12 credits):
(Prerequisite: EFR 515 or equivalent)
EFR 510Qualitative Research Methods3
EFR 516Statistics II3
Advanced Scholarly Tool elective 13
Advanced Scholarly Tool elective 23
Administration emphasis (18 credits):
Core (9 credits):
HE 563Academic Administration in Higher Education3
HE 570Higher Education Law3
HE 576Higher Education Planning and Finance3
Electives (9 credits):
Selected with consent of advisor9
OR
Individualized emphasis (18 credits):
Electives selected with consent of advisor and faculty from area of specialization18
Dissertation12

Instructional Design and Technology

 

Master of Science (MS)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. An overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or a junior/senior year grade point average of 3.00 for the Master of Education and Master of Science degrees, and for the certificate programs.
  2. A 3.5 or better grade point average for all graduate work.
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.
  4. Two essay questions as part of the application process.

Provisional admission may be considered for students whose academic performance does not meet these criteria. Whether such consideration is given will depend on the circumstances and the judgment of the admissions faculty.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the MS degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the IDT program.

  1. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500 level.
  2. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
Required Courses
Core coursework in IDT 9
Additional coursework in IDT area of emphasis9
Foundations coursework in education and psychology3
Scholarly tools/research 6
Electives3
Internship2
Scholarly project or thesis2-4
Total (34-non-thesis or 36- thesis)

The IDT degree options are based on the same set of program components:

  1. Program core component: New courses presenting IDT content.
  2. Research component: Development of research skills.
  3. Foundations component: Fundamental background in psychology.
  4. Area of Emphasis in IDT: Opportunity for area or skill specialization within IDT.

The IDT course requirements are organized within a major, foundations area, research/scholarly tools area, and area of emphasis. The major consists of the IDT core and the area of emphasis in IDT. Students in the MS degree program will be required to complete 18 credit hours of coursework in IDT subject matter. This requirement includes:

Core Coursework
IDT 500Survey of Instructional Design3
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Area of Emphasis
Select three of the following:9
Theories and Models of Instructional Design
Special Topics in Instructional Design and Technology
Readings in Instructional Design and Technology
Research in Instructional Design and Technology (MS must take scholarly tool, does not count toward cognate)
Directed Studies in Instructional Design and Technology
K-12 Emphasis
Technology-Based Instruction: Applications and Methods
Digital Media and the Internet in Schools
Corporate Emphasis
Instructional Design Consulting
Human Performance Technology
Computer- and Web-Based Instruction
Introduction to Computer-Based Instruction
Advanced Computer-Based Instructional Development
Instructional Simulations and Games
Introduction to Web-Based Instruction
Foundations
PSYC 501Psychological Foundations Educ3
Scholarly Tools
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
IDT 592Research in Instructional Design and Technology1-3
Internship
IDT 584Internship in Instructional Design and Technology2-4
Thesis/Scholarly Project
Select one of the following:2-4
Independent Study
Scholarly Project
Thesis
Total Credits29-35

Master of Education (MEd)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

  1. An overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or a junior/senior year grade point average of 3.00 for the Master of Education and Master of Science degrees, and for the certificate programs.
  2. A 3.5 or better grade point average for all graduate work.
  3. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as listed in the Graduate Academic Information section of the graduate catalog.
  4. Two essay questions as part of the application process.

Provisional admission may be considered for students whose academic performance does not meet these criteria. Whether such consideration is given will depend on the circumstances and the judgment of the admissions faculty.

A basic knowledge of the microcomputer and substantial skill in using standard applications to produce work products (word processing, spreadsheet, drawing/painting, graphing, and other common applications).

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the MEd degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the IDT program.

  1. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500 level.
  2. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours required for the degree may be transferred from another institution.
Required Courses
Core coursework in IDT9
Additional coursework in IDT area of emphasis6
Foundations coursework in education and psychology6
Scholarly tools/research 3
Electives6
Internship2
Scholarly Project/Independent Study2
Total Credits34

The IDT degree options are based on the same set of program components:

  1. Program core component: New courses presenting IDT content.
  2. Research component: Development of research skills.
  3. Foundations component: Fundamental background in psychology.
  4. Area of Emphasis in IDT: Opportunity for area or skill specialization within IDT.

The IDT course requirements are organized within a major, foundations area, research/scholarly tools area, and area of emphasis. The major consists of the IDT core and the area of emphasis in IDT. Students in the MEd degree program will be required to complete 15 credit hours of coursework in IDT subject matter. This requirement includes:

Core Coursework
IDT 500Survey of Instructional Design3
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Area of Emphasis
Select two of the following:6
Special Topics in Instructional Design and Technology
Readings in Instructional Design and Technology
Research in Instructional Design and Technology
Directed Studies in Instructional Design and Technology
K-12 Emphasis
Technology-Based Instruction: Applications and Methods
Digital Media and the Internet in Schools
Corporate Emphasis
Instructional Design Consulting
Human Performance Technology
Computer- and Web-Based Instruction
Introduction to Computer-Based Instruction
Advanced Computer-Based Instructional Development
Instructional Simulations and Games
Introduction to Web-Based Instruction
Foundations
PSYC 501Psychological Foundations Educ3
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Scholarly Tools
EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
Internship
IDT 584Internship in Instructional Design and Technology2-4
Scholarly Project
IDT 997Independent Study2
IDT 995Scholarly Project2
Total Credits30-32

Degree Delivery Options

The IDT master’s and certificate programs are available for on-campus and distance delivery, making it possible to attain these degrees via distance delivery, on-campus attendance, or a combination of both. Online students and on-campus students are peers in the same class sessions and experience the same educational opportunities. Courses typically have a few synchronous (live) class sessions, where students may attend on-campus in the actual classroom or they may participate through our distance delivery system. In this manner, class lectures, discussion, presentation, and collaboration are done seamlessly, in a nearly identical fashion to traditional classes.

Asynchronous sessions (those done at the time and place of the students’ choosing each week) are handled through a course management system. Students use these tools to read material loaded by the teacher, turn in assignments, communicate through message boards, participate in discussions through threaded discussion tools, take tests, and receive their grades. There are assignments and participation activities every week, whether the class meets live or not. In this way, students get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of online learning and the personal contact and connection of face-to-face instruction.

PhD Area of Emphasis in IDT

IDT also offers a doctorate through the Teaching and Learning PhD program, in which IDT is an area of emphasis. For details on this option, see the Teaching and Learning PhD program section in the graduate catalog.

Reading Education

 

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements

For the M.S., teacher licensure at one of the following levels: early childhood, elementary, middle or secondary education, or a baccalaureate degree in another field of study is required.

The Reading Education program follows the School of Graduate Studies requirements for a cumulative undergraduate minimum grade point average of 2.75 or a junior/senior year minimum grade point average of 3.00. Applicants must satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as listed in the Graduate Academic Information section of the graduate catalog. Transcripts, recommendations, and a personal statement, i.e., a response to three essay prompts, are part of the School of Graduate Studies and Reading Education application procedure. The personal statement essay should be three pages in length and the prompts are:

  1. Describe your professional background, especially as it relates to teaching reading, writing and other areas of reading/language arts.
  2. What characteristics and strengths do you possess that make you a good candidate for this degree program?
  3. Discuss your professional goals.

Refer to the School of Graduate Studies Admissions and the Education Admissions Process sections of the graduate catalog for additional information on degree and application requirements and procedures.

Degree Requirements

Tracks I and II are based on the following components:

  1. Core Requirements for the Reading Education major and literacy education electives: The courses in the major engage students in learning content about diverse readers, writers, and speakers; curriculum, methods of teaching and assessing; literacy theory and foundations; and professional perspective. T&L 583 Reading Clinic, one of the Core Requirements, involves students in a practicum experience in which they work with readers to apply their core knowledge about teaching literacy to diverse readers.
  2. Research: This component of the program supports development of skills for scholarly inquiry and systematic study of one’s own practice; learning about scholarly inquiry is integrated throughout the coursework.
  3. Foundations: Foundations content supports exploration of progressive education, issues in education and the field of literacy, and affirmation of diversity.

The Core Requirements for the Reading Education major, for both degree programs are:

T&L 524Reading in the Content Areas2
T&L 525Writing in the Classroom3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 534Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation2
T&L 583Reading Clinic (corequisite with T&L 534)2
Total Credits12

Note: All students also complete various requirements specified for their degree program, i.e., for either the M.Ed. or the M.S. Please see below.

The M.S. Reading Education degree program is available in two tracks. Track I, either thesis or non-thesis, is open to licensed persons who wish to follow a research-oriented program of study. Track I requires a minimum of five credits of scholarly tools coursework and allows a maximum of two credits of reading. Track II, available only in the non-thesis option, provides oportunity for non-licensed persons to study Reading Education at the graduate level. Track II requires a minimum of six credits of coursework in Foundations of Education. With careful planning, most M.S. Track I students can meet the course requirements of the North Dakota Reading Credential.

The credit hours for the M.S., Reading Education consist of:

T&L 524Reading in the Content Areas2
T&L 525Writing in the Classroom3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 534Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation2
T&L 583Reading Clinic2
Select two to five of the following:6-13
Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners
Children's Literature in the Classroom
Early Literacy Development and Instruction
Reading in the Secondary School
Teaching and Supervision of Elementary Language Arts
Special Topics
T&L 995Scholarly Project2-6
or T&L 997 Independent Study
or T&L 998 Thesis
Scholarly Tools (Track I only)
Select two of the following:5
Action Research
Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Introduction to Educational Research
Statistics I
Educational Foundations (Track II only)
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Select one of the following:3
Multicultural Education
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
Total Credits31-42

 

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Admission Requirements

For the M.Ed., teacher licensure at one of the following levels: early childhood, elementary, middle or secondary education, or a baccalaureate degree in another field of study is required.

The Reading Education program follows the School of Graduate Studies requirements for a cumulative undergraduate minimum grade point average of 2.75 or a junior/senior year minimum grade point average of 3.00. Applicants must satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as listed in the Graduate Academic Information section of the graduate catalog. Transcripts, recommendations, and a personal statement, i.e., a response to three essay prompts, are part of the School of Graduate Studies and Reading Education application procedure. The personal statement essay should be three pages in length and the prompts are:

  1. Describe your professional background, especially as it relates to teaching reading, writing and other areas of reading/language arts.
  2. What characteristics and strengths do you possess that make you a good candidate for this degree program?
  3. Discuss your professional goals.

Refer to the School of Graduate Studies Admissions and the Education Admissions Process sections of the graduate catalog for additional information on degree and application requirements and procedures.

Degree Requirements

The M.Ed. degree requirements are based on the following components:

  1. Core Requirements for the Reading Education major and literacy education electives: The courses in the major engage students in learning content about diverse readers, writers, and speakers; curriculum, methods of teaching and assessing; literacy theory and foundations; and professional perspective. T&L 583 Reading Clinic, one of the Core Requirements, involves students in a practicum experience in which they work with readers to apply their core knowledge about teaching literacy to diverse readers.
  2. Research: This component of the program supports development of skills for scholarly inquiry and systematic study of one’s own practice; learning about scholarly inquiry is integrated throughout the coursework.
  3. Foundations: Foundations content supports exploration of progressive education, issues in education and the field of literacy, and affirmation of diversity.

The Core Requirements for the Reading Education major, for both degree programs are:

T&L 524Reading in the Content Areas2
T&L 525Writing in the Classroom3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 534Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation2
T&L 583Reading Clinic (corequisite with T&L 534)2
Total Credits12

The M.Ed. Reading Education degree program requires coursework in three areas: The major (reading education), cognate, i.e., coursework that supplements the major, and foundations of education.The program culminates in T&L 995 Scholarly Project or T&L 997 Independent Study. With careful planning, most students can meet the course requirements for the North Dakota Reading Credential.

The credit hours for the M.Ed., Reading Education consist of:

T&L 524Reading in the Content Areas2
T&L 525Writing in the Classroom3
T&L 530Foundations of Reading Instruction3
T&L 534Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation2
T&L 583Reading Clinic (corequisite with T&L 534)2
Select two of the following:6
Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners
Children's Literature in the Classroom
Early Literacy Development and Instruction
Reading in the Secondary School
Teaching and Supervision of Elementary Language Arts
Special Topics (Leadership in Literacy)
T&L 995Scholarly Project2
or T&L 997 Independent Study
Cognate
Sample choices:6
Action Research
Inclusive Methods
Special Topics (Differentiated Instruction)
Theory and Philosophies of Curriculum in Schools
Elementary Education Courses
Science in the Elementary School
Social Studies in the Elementary School
Mathematics in the Elementary School
Early Childhood Education Courses
Play in Development and Early Childhood Education
Language Development & Cognition in Children
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Other courses are suited to the cognate to this area, e.g., English Language Learner courses; courses outside of the department and college may also be acceptable; consult with your advisor.
Educational Foundations
EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
Select one of the following:3
Multicultural Education
Psychological Foundations of Education
Issues and Trends in Education
Historical Foundations of Education
Philosophical Foundations of Education
Social Foundations of Education
Gender, Sexuality and Education
Anthropological Foundations of Education
Total Credits32

Special Education

 

Master of Science (M.S.)

Admission Requirements for the M.S. and M.Ed.

  1. A bachelor’s degree.
  2. For students seeking North Dakota teacher certification, T&L 315 Education of Exceptional Students, or its equivalent taken as either a prerequisite or corequisite with the master’s coursework.
  3. For students seeking North Dakota teacher certification, an elementary reading methods course and an elementary math methods course taken as either prerequisites or corequisites with the master’s coursework.
  4. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.75 for all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the junior and senior years of undergraduate work (based on A = 4.00).
  5. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test, or for the Internet-based TOEFL, a composite score of 79, with minimum scores of 23/30 (speaking); 19/30 (listening); 19/30 (reading); 17/30 (writing) for applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants may also meet language requirements by presenting IETLS scores of 6.5. Students who have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from the United States or English-speaking Canada are not required to submit the TOEFL.

Admissions Process

  1. Complete the School of Graduate Studies online application.
  2. Submit the application fee of $35.
  3. Recommend three people who will complete the recommendation form:
    1. one from an employment supervisor or administrator;
    2. one from a professional colleague or university professor; and
    3. one from a person of your choosing.
  4. Send official transcripts from each institution attended to the School of Graduate Studies.
  5. Complete the personal statement and attach it in the “essay” section of the application. The personal statement should address three questions:
    1. describe several personal and professional goals you would like to achieve in the next five years including why these goals are important to you;
    2. describe the characteristics, attitudes, values, and/or skills that you think will make you a good candidate for your chosen professional role; and
    3. describe what you have done professionally or personally that you are proud of.

Descriptions of the Specialization Areas

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): The ASD specialization area focuses on children, adolescents, and adults with ASD and addresses several aspects of ASD including characteristics, assessment, methods/strategies, interagency collaboration/support, and application in a field setting.

Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE): The ECSE specialization area focuses on children from birth to age nine and addresses various disabilities, primarily developmental in nature, and addresses several aspects of ECSE including characteristics, assessment, methods/strategies, all forms of development, (e.g., language, physical), and application in a field setting.

Emotional Disturbance (ED): The ED specialization area focuses on children and adolescents with both emotional and behavior disorders and addresses several aspects of ED including characteristics, assessment, behavior and academic methods/strategies, and application in a field setting.

General Special Education: The general specialization area is a “design your own program” option. Students can choose courses from all of the courses offered by the special education program.

Gifted/Talented Education (GT): The GT specialization area focuses on children and youth with outstanding talent who perform or show the potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. The specialization area addresses characteristics, assessment, methods/strategies, and application in a field setting.

Intellectual Disabilities (ID): The ID specialization area focuses on children and adolescents with DCD (the federal law refers to this population as those with mental retardation) and addresses several aspects of ID including characteristics, assessment, methods/strategies, and application in a field setting.

Learning Disabilities (LD): The LD specialization area focuses on children and adolescents with learning problems that are not due to developmental, emotional, or cognitive disabilities and addresses several aspects of LD including characteristics, assessment, methods/strategies, and application in a field setting.

Special Education Strategist (SES): The SES specialization area is a cross-categorical area that encompasses all of the courses in the specialization areas of ID, ED, and LD. Since it addresses three disability areas, it is the largest specialization area in number of credits required.

Visual Impairment (VI): The VI specialization area focuses on children and adolescents who are visually impaired or blind and addresses several aspects of VI including characteristics, assessment, braille code, methods/strategies, orientation/mobility, and application in a field setting.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Science degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Special Education program. Note that the Master of Science degree provides both an on-campus and online format.

  1. A minimum of 32 credits including credits required for the major/specialization.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500 level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours may be transferred from another institution.
  4. Two credits of SPED 995 Scholarly Project or four credits of T&L 998 Thesis.
  5. Five credits of scholarly tools/assessment courses. E.g.:
  6. SPED 511Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs3
    SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
    SPED 557Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students3
    SPED 558Response to Intervention2
    SPED 567ASD Assessment2
    SPED 590Special Topics in Special Education1-4
    EFR 509Introduction to Educational Research3
    EFR 515Statistics I3
    T&L 569Action Research3
  7. In addition to #4 and #5 above, choose one or more specialization areas and complete the required courses and elective courses for a minimum total of 32 credits for the M.S. degree*:

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Required Courses
SPED 560Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 561Methods for Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 567ASD Assessment2
SPED 583Internship: Autism Spectrum Disorders1-6
Elective Courses
Select nine of the following:18
Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan
Autistic Spectrum Disorder:Medical Issues and Trends
Structured Teaching
Methods for Students with Asperger Syndrome
Autistic Spectrum Disorder Intensive Early Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education (Introduction to ABA)
Special Topics in Special Education (Experimental Analysis of Behavior)
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-30

Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE)

Required Courses
SPED 510Early Intervention for Children with Special Needs2
SPED 511Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs3
SPED 512Methods and Materials for Preschool Children with Special Needs3
SPED 589Internship: Early Childhood Special Education2-8
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Intervention Strategies with Infants and Toddlers
Advanced Assistive Technology
Language Development & Cognition in Children
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Response to Intervention
Special Topics in Special Education (Infant/Toddler Mental Health)
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-31

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in ECSE in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Emotional Disturbance (ED)

Required Courses
SPED 506Introduction to Emotional Disorders2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 555Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed3
SPED 586Internship: Emotional Disturbance2-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in ED in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

General Special Education

Note that there are no additional required courses. A minimum of 25 credits can be selected from the following courses:

SPED 500Education of the Visually Impaired3
SPED 501Diseases and Function of the Eye2
SPED 502Braille Reading and Writing2
SPED 503Orientation and Mobility/Visually Impaired2
SPED 504Communication Media and Methods/Visually Impaired3
SPED 505Low Vision Assessment and Remediation2
SPED 506Introduction to Emotional Disorders2
SPED 507Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities2
SPED 508Introduction to Learning Disabilities2
SPED 509IEP Development2
SPED 510Early Intervention for Children with Special Needs2
SPED 511Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs3
SPED 512Methods and Materials for Preschool Children with Special Needs3
SPED 514Intervention Strategies with Infants and Toddlers2
SPED 521Transition to Adult Life3
SPED 528Advanced Assistive Technology1
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 552Inclusive Methods3
T&L 553Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community3
SPED 554Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities3
SPED 555Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed3
SPED 556Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties3
SPED 557Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students3
SPED 558Response to Intervention2
SPED 560Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 561Methods for Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 562Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan2
SPED 563Autistic Spectrum Disorder:Medical Issues and Trends2
SPED 564Structured Teaching2
SPED 565Methods for Students with Asperger Syndrome2
SPED 566Autistic Spectrum Disorder Intensive Early Intervention2
SPED 567ASD Assessment2
SPED 578Behavior Management for Special Needs Students3
SPED 590Special Topics in Special Education (Introduction to ABA)2
SPED 590Special Topics in Special Education (Experimental Analysis of Behavior)2
SPED 590Special Topics in Special Education (Infant and Toddler Mental Health)2
EDL 529Special Education Law3

Gifted/Talented (GT)

Required Courses
SPED 522Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 523Assessment in Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 524Teaching Methods in Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 584Internship: Gifted/Talented2-6
Elective Courses
Select five of the following:15
Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education (Response to Intervention)
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas or other T&L courses approved by the advisor

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in GT in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Intellectual Disabilities (ID)

Required Courses
SPED 507Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 556Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties3
SPED 587Internship: Intellectual Disabilities1-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits24-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in ID in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Learning Disabilities (LD)

Required Courses
SPED 508Introduction to Learning Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 554Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities3
SPED 588Internship: Learning Disabilities2-6
Elective Courses
Select five of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in LD in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Strategist (SES)

Required Courses
SPED 506Introduction to Emotional Disorders2
SPED 507Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities2
SPED 508Introduction to Learning Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 554Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities3
SPED 555Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed3
SPED 556Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties3
SPED 586Internship: Emotional Disturbance2-6
SPED 587Internship: Intellectual Disabilities2-6
SPED 588Internship: Learning Disabilities2-6
Elective Courses
Select one of the following:1
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-37

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in SES in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Visual Impairment (VI)

Required Courses
SPED 500Education of the Visually Impaired3
SPED 502Braille Reading and Writing2
SPED 505Low Vision Assessment and Remediation2
SPED 585Internship: Visual Impairment2-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
Diseases and Function of the Eye
Orientation and Mobility/Visually Impaired
Communication Media and Methods/Visually Impaired
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education (Braille Code)
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits24-28

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in VI in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

 

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Master of Education degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Special Education program. Note that the Master of Education degree provides an on-campus format only.

  1. A minimum of 32 credits including credits required for the major/specialization.
  2. At least one-half of the credits must be at or above the 500 level.
  3. A maximum of one-fourth of the credit hours may be transferred from another institution.
  4. Two credits of SPED 995 Scholarly Project or four credits of T&L 998 Thesis.
  5. Six credits of foundations of education courses. E.g.:
  6. EFR 500Foundations of Educational Thought3
    EFR 501Psychological Foundations of Education3
    EFR 502Issues and Trends in Education3
    EFR 503Historical Foundations of Education3
    EFR 504Philosophical Foundations of Education3
    EFR 505Social Foundations of Education3
    EFR 506Multicultural Education3
    EFR 507Gender, Sexuality and Education3
    EFR 508Anthropological Foundations of Education3
    T&L 553Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community3
    SPED 552Inclusive Methods3
  7. In addition to #4 and #5 above, choose one or more specialization areas and complete the required courses and elective courses for a minimum total of 32 credits for the M.Ed. degree*:

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Required Courses
SPED 560Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 561Methods for Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 567ASD Assessment2
SPED 583Internship: Autism Spectrum Disorders1-6
Elective Courses
Select nine of the following:18
Response to Intervention
Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan
Autistic Spectrum Disorder:Medical Issues and Trends
Structured Teaching
Methods for Students with Asperger Syndrome
Autistic Spectrum Disorder Intensive Early Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education (Introduction to ABA)
Special Topics in Special Education (Experimental Analysis of Behavior)
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-30

Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE)

Required Courses
SPED 510Early Intervention for Children with Special Needs2
SPED 511Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs3
SPED 512Methods and Materials for Preschool Children with Special Needs3
SPED 589Internship: Early Childhood Special Education2-8
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Intervention Strategies with Infants and Toddlers
Advanced Assistive Technology
Language Development & Cognition in Children
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education ( Infant/Toddler Mental Health)
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-31

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in ECSE in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Emotional Disturbance (ED)

Required Courses
SPED 506Introduction to Emotional Disorders2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 555Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed3
SPED 586Internship: Emotional Disturbance2-6
Elective Courses
Select five of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in ED in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Gifted/Talented (GT)

Required Courses
SPED 522Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 523Assessment in Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 524Teaching Methods in Gifted/Talented Education3
SPED 584Internship: Gifted/Talented2-6
Elective Courses
Select five of the following:15
Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas or other T&L courses approved by the advisor
Total Credits26-30

  

*

If seeking special education endorsement in GT in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Intellectual Disabilities (ID)

Required Courses
SPED 507Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 556Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties3
SPED 587Internship: Intellectual Disabilities1-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits24-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in DCD in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Learning Disabilities (LD)

Required Courses
SPED 508Introduction to Learning Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 554Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities3
SPED 588Internship: Learning Disabilities2-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-29

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in LD in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Strategist (SES)

Required Courses
SPED 506Introduction to Emotional Disorders2
SPED 507Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities2
SPED 508Introduction to Learning Disabilities2
SPED 551Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students3
SPED 554Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities3
SPED 555Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed3
SPED 556Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties3
SPED 586Internship: Emotional Disturbance2-6
SPED 587Internship: Intellectual Disabilities2-6
SPED 588Internship: Learning Disabilities2-6
Elective Courses
Select one of the following:1
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits25-37

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in SES in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Daktoa, refer to that state’s requirements.

Visual Impairment (VI)

Required Courses
SPED 500Education of the Visually Impaired3
SPED 502Braille Reading and Writing2
SPED 505Low Vision Assessment and Remediation2
SPED 585Internship: Visual Impairment2-6
Elective Courses
Select six of the following:15
Diseases and Function of the Eye
Orientation and Mobility/Visually Impaired
Communication Media and Methods/Visually Impaired
IEP Development
Transition to Adult Life
Advanced Assistive Technology
Inclusive Methods
Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community
Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students
Response to Intervention
Behavior Management for Special Needs Students
Special Topics in Special Education (Braille Code)
Special Education Law
Additional credits from the other specialization areas
Total Credits24-28

 

*

If seeking special education endorsement in VI in North Dakota, confer with your advisor regarding these requirements. If seeking teacher certification in a state other than North Dakota, refer to that state’s requirements.

Teaching and Learning

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Applicants should anticipate that the materials they submit will be held to high standards with the following basic expectations:

  1. Graduate grade point average of 3.5 and above
  2. Excellent writing skills
  3. Three letters of recommendation that address your academic ability, professional accomplishments related to your field of study, and positive character traits
  4. A statement of clear professional/educational goals that can be met by our program as specified in the graduate catalog

Your application must also include the following:

  1. Transcripts
  2. Professional resume
  3. Essay. An original essay not to exceed four double-spaced pages (exclusive of references) on a controversial issue or a problem facing education today. The writing will be reviewed for:
    1. overall suitability for doctoral level study;
    2. cohesive development of ideas;
    3. support for ideas; and
    4. writing conventions. The applicant must also sign a statement attesting that the work submitted was that of the applicant.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Students with a master’s degree in the content field and without previous background in the study of education are eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program with the higher education area of emphasis option.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Philosphy degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Teaching and Learning Department.

  1. Completion of 90 semester credits beyond the baccalaureate degree
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to one-half of the work beyond a master’s degree (maximum of 30 semester credit hours) may be transferred from another institution that offers post-master’s degrees in the discipline.
  4. At least one-half of the work must be in the major field, including:
    • At least 10 credits of dissertation, which incorporates independent work that is an original contribution to knowledge in the field
    • A minimum of 6 credits in the Foundations of Education
    • A minimum of 12 credits of scholarly tools*
    • At least 12 credits of a minor or cognate in a supporting area
  5. Meet one of the three residency options described below.

Residency Requirements for Doctoral Programs

The purpose of residency is to provide an opportunity for sustained and concentrated intellectual effort, to provide for immersion in a research environment, and to permit extensive interaction with fellow students and faculty of the major department.

The residency for programs in education is designed to provide the student with the experiences outlined by the School of Graduate Studies. It is expected that students will engage in serious scholarship and will reflect on their learning and experiences. The expectation is that the students will integrate their doctoral study in order that the program of study they pursue will become a holistic and unified experience. (The residency option is normally declared on the student’s program of study.) The education faculty has outlined some of the conditions required for these goals to be realized. A doctoral student in Teaching and Learning can meet the residency requirement in any one of these ways:

  • Students will complete a residency while enrolled in a minimum of 9 semester hours of credit during each of two consecutive semesters (Fall, Spring or Spring, Fall). Students in this option are encouraged, but are not required, to enroll in a Doctoral Seminar during their residency or at another time in the program. If a student is a GRA, GSA, or GTA, the number of credits that the student may take for this option is less and specified in the catalog.
  • Students will complete a residency while enrolled in a minimum of eight semester hours of credit during each of three consecutive summer sessions and in a minimum of two Doctoral Seminars following their first and second or third summers in residence.
  • Students will complete a residency over a period of three consecutive years of continuous enrollment in a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit (12 credits per year for 3 years) to include a minimum of two Doctoral Seminars during the period of residency.

 

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Admission Requirements

The applicant must meet the School of Graduate Studies’ current minimum general admission requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Applicants should anticipate that the materials they submit will be held to high standards with the following basic expectations:

  1. Graduate grade point average of 3.5 and above
  2. Excellent writing skills
  3. Three letters of recommendation that address your academic ability, professional accomplishments related to your field of study, and positive character traits
  4. A statement of clear professional/educational goals that can be met by our program as specified in the graduate catalog

Your application must also include the following:

  1. Transcripts
  2. Professional resume
  3. Essay. An original essay not to exceed four double-spaced pages (exclusive of references) on a controversial issue or a problem facing education today. The writing will be reviewed for:
    1. overall suitability for doctoral level study;
    2. cohesive development of ideas;
    3. support for ideas; and
    4. writing conventions. The applicant must also sign a statement attesting that the work submitted was that of the applicant.
  4. Satisfy the School of Graduate Studies’ English Language Proficiency requirements as published in the graduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking the Doctor of Education degree at the University of North Dakota must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies as well as particular requirements set forth by the Teaching and Learning Department.

  1. Completion of 96 semester credits beyond the baccalaureate degree
  2. Maintenance of at least a 3.0 GPA for all classes completed as a graduate student.
  3. With approval of a student’s Faculty Advisory Committee, up to one-half of the work beyond a master’s degree (maximum of 30 semester credit hours) may be transferred from another institution that offers post-master’s degrees in the discipline.
  4. At least one-half of the work must be in the major field, including:
    • A dissertation of 10 credits
    • A minimum of 12 credits in the Foundations of Education
    • A minimum of 6 credits of scholarly tools*
    • At least 12 credits of a minor or cognate in a supporting area
  5. One of the three following residency options.
*

Scholarly tool options for the doctoral students in education are described in the Education departmental requirements section of this catalog.

Residency Requirements for Doctoral Programs

The purpose of residency is to provide an opportunity for sustained and concentrated intellectual effort, to provide for immersion in a research environment, and to permit extensive interaction with fellow students and faculty of the major department.

The residency for programs in education is designed to provide the student with the experiences outlined by the School of Graduate Studies. It is expected that students will engage in serious scholarship and will reflect on their learning and experiences. The expectation is that the students will integrate their doctoral study in order that the program of study they pursue will become a holistic and unified experience. (The residency option is normally declared on the student’s program of study.) The education faculty has outlined some of the conditions required for these goals to be realized. A doctoral student in Teaching and Learning can meet the residency requirement in any one of these ways:

  • Students will complete a residency while enrolled in a minimum of 9 semester hours of credit during each of two consecutive semesters (Fall, Spring or Spring, Fall). Students in this option are encouraged, but are not required, to enroll in a Doctoral Seminar during their residency or at another time in the program. If a student is a GRA, GSA, or GTA, the number of credits that the student may take for this option is less and specified in the catalog.
  • Students will complete a residency while enrolled in a minimum of eight semester hours of credit during each of three consecutive summer sessions and in a minimum of two Doctoral Seminars following their first and second or third summers in residence.
  • Students will complete a residency over a period of three consecutive years of continuous enrollment in a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit (12 credits per year for 3 years) to include a minimum of two Doctoral Seminars during the period of residency.

Graduate Certificate Program in College Teaching

Purpose

This certificate program targets faculty (full-time and adjuncts), as well as graduate students who wish to become professors, college instructors, and academic advisors as well as individuals who are teaching or want to teach in college settings.

Objectives

Students will:

  • gain knowledge of pedagogical approaches
  • experience and demonstrate effective teaching skills
  • connect institutional and departmental missions as well as disciplinary norms
  • foster ethical behaviors and professional standards
  • understand the complexities of the academic profession
  • identify emerging trends in college teaching excellence
  • participate in professional forums as a means to enhance knowledge and practice of effective teaching.

Admission Requirements

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university
  2. At the baccalaureate level, have earned a cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all courses of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale

Program Requirements

T&L 539College Teaching3
T&L 548
  & T&L 545
The Professoriate
   and Adult Learners
6
or T&L 544 Assessment in Higher Education
Select one of the following:1-4
Internship in Education
Special Topics (Motivation)
Special Topics (Students with Special Needs)
Total Credits10-13

For Further Information:

Please contact Dr. Myrna R. Olson, College Certificate Program Coordinator, Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education and Human Development, Mailstop 7189, 231 Centennial Drive, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202. Telephone: 701-777-3188; Email: myrna.olson@email.und.edu

Certificate in ELL Education

The Certificate in ELL Education program offers a 20-credit, seven course sequence that fulfills the requirements for the North Dakota ELL teacher endorsement. The program may be completed in three semesters. This program is for those who do not need or want a full master’s program, but who want documentation of their studies in the field.

Required Courses:

EFR 506Multicultural Education3
T&L 513Linguistics for ELL Teachers3
T&L 514Introduction to Multilingual Education3
T&L 537ELL Methods and Materials3
T&L 550Assessment and Evaluation in ELL Education3
T&L 551Second Language Acquisition for ELL Teachrs3
T&L 580Practicum in Schools2
Total Credits20

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Graduate Certificate

Admission Requirements

  1. Online application and fee of $35 (the application fee is waived for McNair Scholars).
  2. One official copy of ALL college and/or university academic transcripts.

ASD Graduate Certificate

Required Courses
SPED 560Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 561Methods for Autistic Spectrum Disorder2
SPED 562Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan2
SPED 567ASD Assessment2
Elective Courses
Select two of the following:4
Autistic Spectrum Disorder:Medical Issues and Trends
Structured Teaching
Methods for Students with Asperger Syndrome
Autistic Spectrum Disorder Intensive Early Intervention
Internship: Autism Spectrum Disorders
Other courses as approved by the faculty advisor
Total Credits12

Instructional Design and Technology

IDT Certificate Programs

IDT offers three 12-credit certificates. The certificates provide minimum competencies in the field of instructional design within a given subset of the field (technology integration, corporate training, or eLearning). Certificates are intended for those already working in some capacity as an instructional designer but who lack an advanced degree in instructional design. Those seeking the full set of professional competencies of an instructional designer across all areas in preparation for entering the field of instructional design are encouraged to apply to one of the IDT master’s programs instead. Courses taken for a certificate may also be transferred into any of the IDT master’s programs at a later date.

IDT Certificate in K-12 Technology Integration

Required Courses
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Select two of the following:6
Technology-Based Instruction: Applications and Methods
Digital Media and the Internet in Schools
Instructional Simulations and Games
Total Credits12

IDT Certificate in eLearning

Required Courses
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Select two of the following:6
Introduction to Computer-Based Instruction
Instructional Simulations and Games
Introduction to Web-Based Instruction
Total Credits12

IDT Certificate in Corporate Training and Performance

Required Courses
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Select two pf the following:6
Instructional Simulations and Games
Instructional Design Consulting
Human Performance Technology
Total Credits12

Degree Delivery Options

The IDT master’s and certificate programs are available for on-campus and distance delivery, making it possible to attain these degrees via distance delivery, on-campus attendance, or a combination of both. Online students and on-campus students are peers in the same class sessions and experience the same educational opportunities. Courses typically have a few synchronous (live) class sessions, where students may attend on-campus in the actual classroom or they may participate through our distance delivery system. In this manner, class lectures, discussion, presentation, and collaboration are done seamlessly, in a nearly identical fashion to traditional classes.

Asynchronous sessions (those done at the time and place of the students’ choosing each week) are handled through a course management system. Students use these tools to read material loaded by the teacher, turn in assignments, communicate through message boards, participate in discussions through threaded discussion tools, take tests, and receive their grades. There are assignments and participation activities every week, whether the class meets live or not. In this way, students get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of online learning and the personal contact and connection of face-to-face instruction.

Cognate/Minor for Non-Program Majors

The IDT program welcomes graduate students outside of IDT who want to learn more about the integration of technology with instruction. To complete a cognate or minor in IDT, students should take the following courses:

IDT 500Survey of Instructional Design3
IDT 520Instructional Systems Analysis and Design3
IDT 525Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Instructional Materials3
Total Credits9

This will be considered by the IDT faculty to be a cognate or minor at the master’s level. If the student is a doctoral student and his or her department requires more credits for a minor, the IDT program chair will work with the student to select additional coursework to meet that minimum.

EDL Courses

EDL 501. Leadership and Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with preparation in skills for providing purpose and direction for individuals and groups, shaping school culture and value, facilitating the development of shared strategic vision for the school, formulating goals and planning change efforts with staff, and setting priorities for one's school in the context of community and district priorities for student and staff needs.

EDL 502. Technology and Information Systems. 2 Credits.

This course provides an understanding of selected computer applications for educational administrators. The focus of instruction is to have educational leaders use the computer as a decision-making and planning tool for carrying out communication functions of administration at the building and district levels.

EDL 503. Seminar Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable to 4 credits.

EDL 511. Effective Administrative Communications. 3 Credits.

This course prepares aspiring school leaders to plan for their personal and professional development; understand and use the principles of interpersonal, oral, and written communication.

EDL 512. Research, Measurement, and Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with an understanding of how to determine what diagnostic information is needed about students, staff, and the school environment; examine the extent to which outcomes meet or exceed defined standards, goals, or priorities for individuals or groups; draw inferences for program revisions; interpret and understand research, measurements, and evaluations; relate programs to desired outcomes; develop equivalent measures of incompetence; and design accountability mechanisms.

EDL 513. Leading Curriculum and Learning. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders the ability to understand major curriculum design models, interpret school district curricula, initiate needs analyses, plan and implement with staff a framework for instruction, align curriculum with anticipated outcomes, monitor social and technological developments as they affect curriculum, and adjust content as needs and conditions change. Corequisite: EDL 535 or EDL 536 or EDL 537.

EDL 514. Supervision and Staff Development. 3 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with preparation in skills for instructional improvement, working with faculty and staff to identify professional needs. Classes are designed for in-depth study and practice planning, organizing, and facilitating programs that improve faculty and staff effectiveness and are consistent with institutional goals and needs; supervising individuals and groups; providing feedback on performance; arranging for remedial assistance; engaging faculty and others to plan and participate in recruitment and development activities; and initiating self-development.

EDL 515. Education Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course is designed as a beginning law course for school administrators. In addition to the acquisition of legal knowledge as it relates to P-12 education, students are introduced to ethical perspectives that frequently influence the legal decision-making process.

EDL 516. Education Finance and Policy. 3 Credits.

Includes such topics as the organization of and responsibility for education in the United States at the federal, state, and local levels; basic administrative theories, processes, and techniques; and major areas of concern in the operation of local schools. The course includes an experiential learning assignment in which students complete a budget project.

EDL 517. Social, Cultural, Political, and Community Dimensions of Schools. 4 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with an understanding of the historical, philosophical, ethical, social, and economic influences affecting education to the degree that they can apply their understandings to professional decisions. Students are expected to apply political concepts and strategies and approaches to collaboration in involving the community in decision making, building community support for integrating health and social services in support of students, and developing community support for school priorities. Throughout the course, students' work will be expected to manifest a sensitivity to issues of diversity in a pluralistic society.

EDL 519. Principalship. 2 Credits.

This course provides school leaders with an understanding of the role of the building principal along with skills and techniques associated with the principalship. The topics include the principal's role in community and family relationships and collaboration, using community resources to support the academic and social needs of students and families, the development and application of policies related to students and staff, planning and delivering of curricular and cocurricular programs within the school, and the principal's role in working with staff. Students must also enroll in a one-credit field-based experience (EDL 520, 521 or 522) appropriate for their desired level of preparation for the principalship.

EDL 520. Middle School Principal Field Study. 1 Credit.

This course provides a field-based experience in the role of the middle school principal. Corequisite: EDL 519.

EDL 521. Elementary Principal Field Study. 1 Credit.

This course provides a field-based experience in the role of the elementary school principal. Corequisite: EDL 519.

EDL 522. Secondary Principal Field Study. 1 Credit.

This course provides a field-based experience in the role of the secondary school principal. Corequisite: EDL 519.

EDL 523. The Educational Plant. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the planning, construction, modification, and maintenance of school buildings and complimentary facilities such as playgrounds, athletic fields and facilities, drop-off zones, and parking lots. This course will include appraisal of school facilities and techniques for developing and using input from the community and building and program audits.

EDL 524. Educational Personnel Administration. 2 Credits.

Study of selection, assignment, evaluation, development, and release practices for certified and non-certified school personnel; salary and contract administration in schools.

EDL 526. Business Management in Education. 2 Credits.

Study of the business function in educational organizations with emphasis on budget development and administration, accounting, purchasing, risk management, support services, and capital outlay.

EDL 527. Legal Issues in Education. 3 Credits.

Study of the legal issues affecting educational organizations with emphasis on state and federal relationships to local institutions, school boards and other governing bodies, contracts, teachers' and students' rights, and tort liability of educational organizations and their officers. Consideration is given to legal research and policy analysis.

EDL 529. Special Education Law. 3 Credits.

A course designed to give participants a working knowledge of the legislative, judicial, and administrative changes which have revamped the areas of teaching and administering special education since 1974. It will provide information useful to administrators, practitioners, attorneys, parents, and advocates on topics including: student records, discipline, related services, due process, least restrictive environment, and appropriate education.

EDL 531. School District Leadership. 2 Credits.

A study of concerns and issues related to education leadership and administration at the district level, including relationships between the superintendent and the school board, community and school district staff.

EDL 532. Staff and Program Evaluation. 2 Credits.

A study of the evaluation of staff, including teachers, administrators, support personnel, and boards; and for purposes of accreditation, the evaluation of components that support the curriculum. Procedures, processes, and instruments will be identified and analyzed.

EDL 533. Collective Negotiations. 2 Credits.

A study of the collective bargaining process in the field of education. Includes topics such as contract language, planning for negotiations, bargaining strategies, impasse and arbitration, contract maintenance, grievance procedures, and results of the negotiations.

EDL 535. Administration of Elementary School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of an elementary curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of elementary curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive K-5 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 536. Administration of Middle School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of the middle school level curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of middle school level curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive 6-8 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 537. Administration of Secondary School Curriculum. 1-3 Credits.

Designed primarily for graduate students seeking positions as curriculum coordinators or administrative positions. A study of leadership skills for developing the administrator's understanding of knowledge construction, adult learning, planning and implementing a framework for curriculum design and instruction, and the professional responsibility for assessing and implementation of secondary curriculum. The course examines the current issues, trends, subject areas, student achievement, and challenges for the future of middle school level curriculum. The student will research the current best practices for application of administrative skills in relationship to supervision of a comprehensive 9-12 grade level curriculum and its impact on learners. Corequisite: EDL 513.

EDL 538. Auxiliary School Functions. 3 Credits.

Overview of school business and facilities management for educational administrators. Topics include: introduction to special area budgeting and accounting; insurance and risk management; forecasting; vendor relations; supervision of classified and support staff; management of support services, e.g., transportation, food service; facility operation and maintenance; and space utilization analysis, allocation; and cooperative community use of facilities.

EDL 571. School Community Relations. 2 Credits.

Study of the responsibility of classroom, attendance unit, and district personnel in public information efforts; design, use, and analysis of surveys; study of involvement of parents and other community members in resource, advisory, and decision-making activities; preparation of news releases and public information materials; study of relationships to media personnel.

EDL 572. Educational Systems and Planning. 2 Credits.

A study of the planning process including topics such as establishing goals; assessing needs; identifying resources; and generating, analyzing, and selecting alternatives. Processes and techniques in planning will be emphasized.

EDL 573. Administration and Organizational Behavior I. 3 Credits.

A study and critique of selected theories and research in administration and organizational behavior including topics such as leadership; formal and informal structure; communication; change and intervention; motivation and morale; interpersonal relations and conflict management; small-group processes; and personality, values, and ethics.

EDL 574. Administration and Organizational Behavior II. 3 Credits.

A continuation of Administration and Organizational Behavior I. Provides the student with the opportunity to design and carry out an original field study project in organizational behavior, participate in critiquing studies designed and completed by fellow students, and engage in individualized study in a topic area related to behavior in organizations.

EDL 575. Education and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of policy issues, analysis of policy formation, implementation analysis, and structures and actors in policy activity.

EDL 579. Special Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of educational leadership not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

EDL 589. Superintendency Series. 1 Credit.

EDL 593. Internship in Educational Leadership. 1-8 Credits.

This is a culminating experience primarily for Specialist Diploma and doctoral students. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational, cognate, and major area coursework and consent of the advisor and instructor.

EDL 597. Readings in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor.

EDL 599. Individual Research in Educational Leadership. 1-4 Credits.

May be repeated. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor.

EDL 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

EDL 997. Independent Study. 1-4 Credits.

EDL 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

EDL 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

EFR Courses

EFR 500. Foundations of Educational Thought. 3 Credits.

A problem-centered class dialogue on those philosophical, social, political and historical concepts of educational thought that have shaped the development of the learning experience.

EFR 501. Psychological Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

A study of the learning process with secondary emphasis on how the learning process is affected by individual differences, growth and development, and personality. A background in undergraduate Educational Psychology is assumed. Both theories of learning and theories of instruction are considered. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 502. Issues and Trends in Education. 3 Credits.

Examination of contemporary issues of education and some of the political, social, and historical foundations which influence their development. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 503. Historical Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

An historical examination of the concepts of the meaning, nature, process, and purposes of education as evolved in different historical periods and social contexts with emphasis on the learners, ideas and changing institutions. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 504. Philosophical Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

A study of the representative schools of thought which have structured major philosophies of education. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 505. Social Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

The study of schools and education in social contexts such as community, polity, equity, race, class, gender, and social reproduction. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 506. Multicultural Education. 3 Credits.

A review of the conceptual, historical and theoretical aspects of multicultural education. A major goal will be to provide educators with processes for incorporating multicultural education into educational environments; to meet the needs of culturally diverse students and to increase the cultural awareness and sensitivity of all students. North Dakota/Native American issues are primary elements of this course. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 507. Gender, Sexuality and Education. 3 Credits.

A critical feminist analysis of the history, philosophy, theory, curriculum, and practice of education. The roles of educators, students, society, biology, and policy are considered in the schooling of females, males, and those of diverse sexualities. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 508. Anthropological Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

Students will examine the convergence of anthropology and education through an analysis of education as cultural transmission and a review of enculturation and acculturation processes in traditional and modern societies. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 509. Introduction to Educational Research. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the research methodologies used to study education. The course covers quantitative as well as qualitative types of research. The paradigms of both types of research will be contrasted and the application of the methodologies in actual research investigated.

EFR 510. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Qualitative research methods are naturalistic and contextual. The methodology derives from Anthropology and other social sciences, and seeks to understand human behavior from the actors' perspective. Students are to learn the fundamental data collection methods: observation, participant observation, and interviewing, as well as data analysis through coding and categorizing.

EFR 511. Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary course which studies the theoretical models of program evaluation as well as professional standards. Emphasis is on the analysis of models for implementation and application in various social and public policy fields, as well as education. S.

EFR 512. Educational Tests and Measurements. 3 Credits.

An introduction to psychological tests and measurements in educational settings and various research environments. The course covers basic concepts and principles in selection, construction, application, and evaluation of educational/psychological tests and measurements. Prerequisites: EFR 515 or consent of instructor. S.

EFR 513. Computer Applications in Educational Statistics. 3 Credits.

A study of computer applications in educational statistics, usually involving relatively large data sets using SPSS and/or SAS. Prerequisites: EFR 515 (or concurrent) or consent of instructor.

EFR 514. Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

Discourse analysis is a research methodology used to analyze naturally occuring language use, whether in writing or in speech. It draws from and is practiced in many social science and humanities disciplines related to the foundations of education, including linguistics, sociology, anthropology, communications, and cognitive and social psychology. This course will provide students with the building blocks of performing discourse analysis, including instruction in its philosophical foundations, its practices, and its implications.

EFR 515. Statistics I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to basic statistical methods, focusing primarily on descriptive statistics and inferential statistics up to and including two-way analysis of variance.

EFR 516. Statistics II. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of inferential statistics with primary emphasis on analysis of variance models, multiple regression techniques, analysis of covariance and other higher-order statistical procedures. Prerequisites: EFR 515 or consent of instructor. S,SS.

EFR 517. Advanced Research Methodologies. 3 Credits.

Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of research are considered for a variety of topics, including ethics in research, use of data banks, Q-methodology, survey research, Bayesian concepts, critical theory, longitudinal research and research consultation. Comprehensive examinations in educational research are addressed. This is a capstone course in educational research. Previous or concurrent involvement in research is highly desirable. Available for doctoral level students only.

EFR 518. Multivariate Analysis. 3 Credits.

Multiple regression in generalized problem solving; discriminant analysis, factor analysis, multivariate analysis, canonical analysis, and multivariate analysis of covariance. Students are encouraged to analyze their own data including student-generated computer applications.

EFR 519. Research Seminar. 1-4 Credits.

Experimental Design--An in-depth treatment of analysis of variance designs including factoral designs, treatment by subjects designs, groups within treatment designs, latin squares, higher dimensional designs, mixed effect designs, analysis of covariance, and trend analysis. Emphasis is placed on underlying linear models. Other seminars are held on specific research topics, particularly research proposals. May be repeated.

EFR 520. Advanced Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Advanced Qualitative Research Methods will engage students in more in-depth and complex theoretical and practical issues associated with the methodology. Students will conduct mini-research studies and examine qualitative studies conducted by others. Knowledge about IRB requirements will also be addressed. Prerequisites: EFR 510 or consent of instructor.

EFR 522. Mixed-Methods Research. 3 Credits.

Mixed-methods research is the practice of combining quantitative and qualitative analysis within a single study. Students will learn the history and conceptual underpinnings of this methodological practice, read exemplary empirical studies that use mixed-methods, and explore the major mixed-methods designs. To apply these understandings, students will conduct a mixed-methods study on a topic of their own interests. Prerequisites: EFR 510 and EFR 516, or consent of instructor. S.

EFR 524. Needs Assessment. 3 Credits.

Needs assessment is a common evaluation method. This interdisciplinary course will study the concept of needs as well as the processes and techniques of conducting needs assessment. A set of techniques for implementation and application of needs assessment in various community, education, social work, public health, business/industry settings, government, and non-profit agencies will be reviewed. F.

EFR 525. International and Comparative Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of the major issues, concepts and methods of comparative and international education. Focuses on the development of the field, the uses of comparison, the impact of globalization, and policy and practice development around the world at all levels of education. Prerequisites: EFR 500 or consent of instructor.

EFR 584. Internship in Educational Research. 1-8 Credits.

Practical experience in the conduct of educational research, analyzing data, and writing reports. Available for doctoral level students only. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Appropriate coursework in educational research and consent of the adviser and department chair.

EFR 590. Special Topics in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of education not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

EFR 591. Readings in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

EFR 592. Individual Research in Education. 1-4 Credits.

May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

EFR 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

EFR 997. Independent Study M Ed & M S. 2 Credits.

EFR 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

EFR 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.

HE Courses

HE 500. Higher Education Orientation. 1 Credit.

This course provides an orientation to graduate masters education. On demand.

HE 501. Introduction to Higher Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of administration of America's colleges and universities. Topics include roles of state and federal government, governing boards, institutional organization and culture, types of institutions, faculty, students, research about higher education, and the profession of administrator. On demand.

HE 503. Diversity Across Higher Education. 3 Credits.

The course intends to promote understanding of the diverse populations within higher education and to encourage students to examine their own attitudes regarding diversity and openness to other cultures. Examination of practice models for service delivery to diverse populations will help prepare students to develop management, leadership, and advocacy skills. The course will underscore the development of skills for working with individuals, small groups, and campus groups in relation to equity, diversity, and inclusion. On demand.

HE 505. The College Student. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the theoretical perspectives that describe students' growth throughout the late adolescent and adult life span. The course will look at theory in the areas of intellectual, moral, ego, psychosocial, career, and spiritual development. Further, the course will examine sources of identity including gender, race, culture, ethnicity, and sexual identity. On demand.

HE 507. Collegiate Environments. 3 Credits.

The course will discuss how student characteristics influence student educational and development needs, and the effects of the college experience on student learning and development. This course also will examine collegiate environments and how students' person-environment interactions affect their development. On demand.

HE 509. Higher Education Management. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the administrative functions of higher education including student affairs, academic affairs, institutional advancement, and administrative services. Students will be introduced to professional issues, ethics, standards of practice, and the legal environment. On demand.

HE 511. Program Development. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the learning theories that undergird the design and delivery of educational programs and services. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills needed to conduct needs assessments and outcomes assessments in-person and mediated environments. They will also learn and demonstrate program planning, development and implementation process. On demand.

HE 513. College Students and the Law. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of key legal issues that pertain to college students. Using a legal frame and analysis, the focus of the course surrounds administrative decision making, effective practices, and organizational policy design and implementation. On demand.

HE 529. Capstone Seminar. 1 Credit.

Capstone course for students in the Higher Education master's program. On demand.

HE 530. Orientation to Doctoral Study. 1 Credit.

This course provides an orientation to doctoral study . On demand.

HE 532. Principles and Practices in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for students newly admitted to the doctoral program in higher education. It introduces the students to the study of higher education enterprise in terms of its context, research, and practice. Among the topics covered, students in the course will explore the significance of institutional missions and purposes, federal and state governments, and the academic community. On demand.

HE 536. Leading and Learning in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Colleges and universities are complex organizations with a core purpose of learning. An understanding of organizations, what they are and how they function is critical to success as a higher education professional. Further each member of the organization is called on to provide leadership for the organization in the classroom, the department, and other organizational units. Effective leaders will understand the organization and how their roles and work help support the institution's effectiveness in educating students. On demand.

HE 538. College Student Experiences. 3 Credits.

Given the growing awareness, economically, politically, and socially, of the need for students to succeed in college, faculty, staff, and administrators are increasingly being held accountable for college persistence and completion. A significant factor in students' success is their learning and development. Students in this course will explore concepts and theories related to student learning and development and be challenged to interpret and apply theories to real-world higher education practice, considering how these processes influence student success. On demand.

HE 549. Dissertation Orientation. 2 Credits.

This course introduces students to the dissertation process, focusing specifically on proposal formulation. On demand.

HE 561. Curriculum in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

A study of processes for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum within institutions of higher education. Topics will include historical perspectives on curriculum in higher education, governance systems related to curriculum development and adoption, and issues of current interest and concern. On demand.

HE 563. Academic Administration in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

The roles and responsibilities of academic administration in higher education. Topics include the major academic roles (chairperson, dean, chief academic officer), curriculum and instruction, program evaluation, assessment, planning, faculty workload and evaluation, and the profession of administrator. On demand.

HE 564. Higher Education Student and Support Services. 3 Credits.

An overview of the organization and functions of student and support services within institutions of higher education. Students will gain an understanding of the administrative issues related to career services, student counseling, enrollment services, student activities, health services, student organization, and other institutional units, which serve the needs of students at a college or university. On demand.

HE 569. Higher Education Diversity Systems and Policy. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of issues of diversity in higher education from an institutional and systematic perspective. Multiple levels and dimensions of diversity will be discussed, including structural, institutional and systematic manifestations of how diversity and equity are historically and currently addressed. Institutional type and role will also be explored. On demand.

HE 570. Higher Education Law. 3 Credits.

An overview of the legal issues that confront college and university personnel. Pertinent federal and state statutes as well as case law will be used to instruct about legal rights and responsibilities of university/college administrators and students. The legal relationships between the institution and the faculty, the student, state government, and the federal government will be explored. On demand.

HE 573. Higher Education and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

The course addresses the development, analysis, and implementation of public policy in postsecondary education and the structures and actors involved in policy activity. The course will also Introduce students to current and ongoing postsecondary public policy issues at the state, national, and international levels. On demand.

HE 576. Higher Education Planning and Finance. 3 Credits.

Higher education must plan to ensure the future of the institution and those plans guide the allocation of resources to accomplish the institutional mission and plan. This course will provide an overview of planning processes and the subsequent allocation of resources to implement the plan. Students will also learn about financial management including budgeting, financial policies and performance metrics. The college administrator's role in guiding the fiscal welfare of an institution of higher education will be explored. On demand.

HE 579. Special Topics in Higher Education. 1-3 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of education not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics . Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

HE 591. Practicum in Higher Education. 1-4 Credits.

Students will complete projects to further student learning through course design, teaching, and assessment. Repeatable up to a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. On demand.

HE 592. Internship in Higher Education. 1-8 Credits.

This is a professional practice experience in an administrative unit. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of the advisor and instructor. On demand.

HE 594. Readings in Higher Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor. On demand.

HE 595. Higher Education Seminar. 1-9 Credits.

A seminar for advanced graduate students on a focused topic. Students will have significant responsibility for preparing and presenting papers and studies on the focus topic. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and advisor. On demand.

HE 597. Administrative Project in Higher Education. 1-4 Credits.

For advanced graduate students. Students will undertake an assignment from an administrator for a project that will be implemented once it is completed. Repeatable to a maximum of 4 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor. On demand.

HE 598. Individual Research in Higher Education. 1-9 Credits.

Students design a research study, implement the research plan, and/or publish the results of the project. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and instructor.

HE 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. On demand.

HE 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 48 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor.

HE 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor.

HE 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor.

HE 999. Dissertation. 6-18 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor.

SPED Courses

SPED 500. Education of the Visually Impaired. 3 Credits.

A course which provides an overview of the field of visual impairment to include the following areas of emphases: History/Philosophy; Service-delivery models; medical, psychological and educational implications of partial vision or total blindness; curricula methods and materials; current issues/trends.

SPED 501. Diseases and Function of the Eye. 2 Credits.

A course which introduces students to: a) the structural parts of the eye and its functions; b) common ocular conditions and diseases and their implications for education; c) interpretation of medical eye examination reports; and d) special considerations for infant, school-age academic, multiply disable and adult populations.

SPED 502. Braille Reading and Writing. 2 Credits.

In this course students learn: 1) to read and write the literary code of grade 2 braille and 2) to teach the literary code of grade 2 braille to students of all ages.

SPED 503. Orientation and Mobility/Visually Impaired. 2 Credits.

This course introduces students to basic orientation and mobility techniques used by specialists when working with individuals with low vision and blindness. Concept development, kinesiology, tactile map construction, dog guides, electronic mobility devices and parental involvement are topics covered with respect to various populations (i.e. infants, schoolage academic children, multiply disabled children and adults).

SPED 504. Communication Media and Methods/Visually Impaired. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the communication devices and adaptive technology used by the visually disabled. Students learn to read and write the braille codes for mathematics and music, do basic calculations on the abacus, brailler and talking calculator and gain familiarity with computers and software currently used in the field. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SPED 505. Low Vision Assessment and Remediation. 2 Credits.

A course which focuses on children who have severe visual deficits but with proper training are able to utilize their vision for learning. Effects of low vision are studied with respect to psychological/sociological development, academic learning, skills of independent living, and vocational choice. Methods of assessing visual function are examined with emphasis on adaptions needed in the educational settings. Optical and non-optical aids are compared and evaluated. Prerequisite: T&L 315 or consent of instructor.

SPED 506. Introduction to Emotional Disorders. 2 Credits.

The historical perspective and the complexities of identification and characteristics of emotional disorders will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multisystems approach.

SPED 507. Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities. 2 Credits.

The historical perspective and the complexities of identification and characteristics of intellectual disabilities will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multi-systems approach. F,S,SS.

SPED 508. Introduction to Learning Disabilities. 2 Credits.

The historical perspective and the complexities of identification and characteristics of learning disabilities will be covered. Students will gain an understanding of service delivery models within a multisystems approach.

SPED 509. IEP Development. 2 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the individualized education plan (IEP) process, including an understanding of how to develop and write effective IEPs for students with disabilities. In addition, the IEP template and process used by the state of North Dakota (i.e., TIENET) will be addressed.

SPED 510. Early Intervention for Children with Special Needs. 2 Credits.

An introduction to the field of Early Childhood Special Education, primarily for students interested in entering the field. Issues such as program design, parent involvement, identification, infant education, and effects of disabilities will be covered.

SPED 511. Identification and Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles and procedures for screening, identifying and evaluating young children with special needs. Emphasis will be placed on exposing students to available assessment instruments and providing opportunities for actual testing of preschoolers. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 512. Methods and Materials for Preschool Children with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of curricula, program development and intervention strategies for disabled children ages birth to 6. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 514. Intervention Strategies with Infants and Toddlers. 2 Credits.

This course provides for study into the unique needs of infants and toddlers with disabilities as well as the delivery of intervention services to the very young child with disabilities and his/her family.

SPED 515. Professional Development. 1 Credit.

This course will provide an orientation to the roles and responsibilities of being a resident teacher in special education. Restricted to resident teachers in special education.

SPED 521. Transition to Adult Life. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on education, personal and vocational transition issues for students with disabilities across all grade levels into adult life. Assessment and transition program planning will be covered along with interagency collaboration skills and career awareness.

SPED 522. Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Historical and evolutionary research, theories, and philosophies for understanding the developmental and social-emotional needs of the more able child from early childhood through adolescence in educational experiences. Characteristics of G/T learners in the intellectual, leadership, academic, and creative realms; asynchrony; stereotypes; comorbidities; issues surrounding the identification of G/T learners. Cultural and societal influences on the field; educational trends. Prerequisite: T&L 315 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 523. Assessment in Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Formal and informal assessments of characteristics of G/T learners in the intellectual, leadership, academic, and creative realms for identification and qualification for educational programming; assessment of readiness and content mastery. Ongoing assessment, progress monitoring, and data interpretation skills will be practiced. Issues surrounding the identification of G/T learners, including misdiagnosis, stereotyping, and bias will be critically evaluated. Legal issues surrounding this area, and cultural influences on data sources will be explored. Prerequisite: T&L 315, T&L 423 SPED 551, or permission of the instructor.

SPED 524. Teaching Methods in Gifted/Talented Education. 3 Credits.

Methodological and pedagogical approaches for fulfilling the unique academic, intellectual, creative, social, and emotional needs of the more able child in the educational environment. Exploration and analysis of contributing research, theories, and philosophies for designing differentiated learning opportunities from early childhood through adolescence via multiple modes (i.e. Bloom's Taxonomy, Multiple Intelligence's, technologies, multicultural and creative materials, etc.); educational trends through curriculum design and the integration of formal and informal assessment data and national/state standards to create individualized learning goals through curriculum compacting, tiering, acceleration, academic planning, modifications, and mentorships. Exploration and analysis of curriculum models to suit various learning needs of the asynchronous child with multiple forms of exceptionality (LD, ED, ASD, ELL); legal, cultural, and stereotype issues affecting the implementation of enriched curriculum for the G/T child with comorbidities. Prerequisite: SPED 522.

SPED 528. Advanced Assistive Technology. 1 Credit.

This course covers the types and functions of assistive technology for students with disabilities across a variety of settings, e.g., home, schools and community. Assistive technology assessment and a working knowledge of best practices of assistive technology in the lives of students will be addressed. Identification of funding sources and assistive technology resources will also be covered.

SPED 551. Advanced Assessment/Special Needs Students. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of assessment, including formal and informal procedures for screening, identification and assessment of students with disabilities. Practical assignment included. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 552. Inclusive Methods. 3 Credits.

The study of a variety of methods and materials for teaching and assessing children and youth with learning and behavior problems in the general education classroom.

SPED 554. Advanced Methods: Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

The study of specific strategies, methods, and materials for working with students with learning disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 555. Advanced Methods: Emotionally Disturbed. 3 Credits.

The study of specific strategies, methods, and materials for working with students with emotional/behavioral disorders. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 556. Advanced Methods: Intellectual Disabilties. 3 Credits.

This course is a masters level methods course designed for professionals seeking to extend their skills in the areas of instruction, functional (life skills) curriculum, program and curriculum development, and functional behavioral analysis for working with students with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. Prerequisites: Graduate status and admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 557. Progress Monitoring/Special Needs Students. 3 Credits.

This course covers all aspects of progress monitoring including what it is, how it works, the benefits of progress monitoring, various ways and strategies for conducting progress monitoring and how it functions in a Response to Intervention (RTI) model. Students will learn how to track students in reading, math, and written language by collecting data and then using that data to measure student progress and in instructional decision-making. The strongest research-based strategy for progress monitoring, curriculum-based measurement, will be covered in depth. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education. F,S,SS.

SPED 558. Response to Intervention. 2 Credits.

This course will address common elements of Response to Intervention (RTI) including definition, components of successful RTI models, establishing RTI teams and building capacity for school-wide RTI implementation, the use of standard protocol in RTI implementation, monitoring progress in academics and behavior within RTI models, understanding guidelines for problem-solving/decision making in RTI, as well as the future direction of RTI. F,SS.

SPED 560. Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder. 2 Credits.

This is the introductory course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder. Its central purpose is to encourage parents and caregivers of individuals with autistic spectrum disorder to engage in reflective thinking about and critical analysis of the many and varied issues, e.g., identification, educational placement, effective treatments, vocational training, related to the provision of quality lifelong supports for these individuals. Prerequisites: Completed degree from a related field of study, or seniors who have completed T&L 315, and are completing an undergrad degree from a related field of study (see dept for approval).

SPED 561. Methods for Autistic Spectrum Disorder. 2 Credits.

This is the second required course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to encourage caregivers and parents who work with persons with ASD to engage in reflective thinking about and critical analysis of the many and varied programs and methods commonly applied in practice with persons with ASD or frequently discussed in the professional literature base. Prerequisite or corequisite: SPED 560.

SPED 562. Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Supports Across the Lifespan. 2 Credits.

This is the third required course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is threefold: a) to provide current information related to the chronic stressors experienced by caregivers for and family members of persons with ASD, b) to provide current information regarding career/vocational options related to transition from high school through adult life, e.g., young adults, middle-aged adults, older adults, and c) to provide current information regarding legal issues related to the provision of lifelong supports for persons with ASD. Prerequisites or corequisites: SPED 560 and SPED 561.

SPED 563. Autistic Spectrum Disorder:Medical Issues and Trends. 2 Credits.

This is the final required course in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to examine the role and future of medicine and medically oriented interventions for persons with ASD. Included in the course are discussions of issues related to conducting wellness examinations with persons with ASD, medication treatments currently available and those that will become available in the future. Prerequisites or corequisites: SPED 560 and SPED561.

SPED 564. Structured Teaching. 2 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Its central purpose is to encourage parents and caregivers of individuals with ASD to engage in reflective thinking about and critical analysis of this educational approach for these persons. Prerequisites or corequisites: SPED 560 and SPED 561.

SPED 565. Methods for Students with Asperger Syndrome. 2 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). This course focuses specifically on the students who function at the high end of the spectrum. The purpose of this course is to provide parents, teachers, and caregivers of individuals with Asperger Syndrome (AS) background, knowledge, and experience with the diagnosis and characteristics, assessments, functional analysis, various methods and practices, transition planning, and support for families related to the provision of quality lifelong supports for these individuals. Prerequisites or corequisites: SPED 560 and SPED 561.

SPED 566. Autistic Spectrum Disorder Intensive Early Intervention. 2 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) birth to age six. Topics addressed will include basic characteristics of children with ASD birth to age six, the developmental implications for these children and their families, and research-supported early interventions utilizing a family-centered approach with an emphasis on natural learning opportunities.

SPED 567. ASD Assessment. 2 Credits.

This is an elective course in the sequence of interdisciplinary courses focusing on autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) offered by the University of North Dakota. Its central focus is on assessing the ongoing needs and strengths of students with ASD in order to plan successful interventions in further differentiating instruction. Prerequisite: SPED 560. Corequisite: SPED 561. F,S.

SPED 578. Behavior Management for Special Needs Students. 3 Credits.

The study of a variety of effective behavior management and assessment techniques appropriate to the needs of children and youth with special needs. Topics include procedures to increase self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, self-esteem, and assessment procedures and techniques for determining behavioral needs. Prerequisite: Admission to one of the master's programs in special education.

SPED 580. Practicum: Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Practicum in the study of children and adolescents with disabilities in school and related settings. May be repeated to 8 credits.

SPED 583. Internship: Autism Spectrum Disorders. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of autism spectrum disorders. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 560, SPED 561, and consent of the instructor.

SPED 584. Internship: Gifted/Talented. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of gifted/talented. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 522, SPED 523, and SPED 524, or consent of the instructor.

SPED 585. Internship: Visual Impairment. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students who are seeking licensure or an endorsement in the area of visual impairment. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Repeatable up to 6 credits maximum. Prerequisties: SPED 500, SPED 501, SPED 502, and consent of the instructor. F,S,SS.

SPED 586. Internship: Emotional Disturbance. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of emotional disburbance. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SPED 587. Internship: Intellectual Disabilities. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of Intellectual disabilities. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. F,S,SS.

SPED 588. Internship: Learning Disabilities. 1-6 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students in the area of learning disabilities. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SPED 589. Internship: Early Childhood Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

This is a culminating experience for students who are seeking licensure or an endorsement in the area of early childhood special education. This course is designed for students to synthesize previously learned information from coursework as they apply and implement their knowledge and skills through written products and classroom performance. Prerequisites: SPED 510, SPED 511 and SPED 512, and consent of the instructor.

SPED 590. Special Topics in Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of special education. May be repeated for different topics.

SPED 591. Readings: Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and Instructor.

SPED 593. Independent Project: Special Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and Instructor.

SPED 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

The scholarly project demonstrates critical analysis and application of information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. The project allows students to demonstrate scholarly skills in an integrated manner that is directly related to their roles as teachers, program evaluators, and action researchers. The scholarly project must be approved by the student's advisor. Prerequisites: Consent of advisor and Instructor.

T&L Courses

T&L 513. Linguistics for ELL Teachers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the complexities of human language through the study of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Additional topis addressed include the brain and language, history of the English language, psycholinguistics, writing systems and language in social contexts. F,S,SS.

T&L 514. Introduction to Multilingual Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores language education models, programs and policies with an emphasis on English language learners (ELLs). Political, legal, historical, and cultural contexts of multilingual education will be discussed with a focus on both U.S. and global challenges.

T&L 515. Middle School Curriculum. 3 Credits.

This course examines the middle school curriculum and instructional strategies as well as the needs of early adolescents. The course focuses on the roles teachers play in incorporating a guided, interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. The studies include the components of curriculum teaming, advisory, exploration, learning communities) and instruction (differentiation, cooperative learning, learning styles, instructional strategies) incorporated in middle schools.

T&L 516. Philosophy and Foundations of Middle School Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historical and philosophical background of middle level education. The focus is on the roles teachers/administrators play in incorporating this guided, interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach that assists students during these fundamentally transformative years. The course looks at the philosophical aspect of the curriculum and instructional component. The studies explore contemporary issues associated with the middle school as well as the adaptations necessary for special circumstances affiliated with middle schools.

T&L 518. Science in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms.

T&L 519. Social Studies in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing social studies in elementary classrooms.

T&L 520. Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School. 4 Credits.

A study of processes for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum and improving instruction in elementary schools.

T&L 521. Differentiated Instruction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the principles of differentiated instruction. Topics of study include: brain-based learning, responsive instructional and assessment strategies, linking curriculum standards to learner needs, organizing and managing a differentiated classroom, and relevant resources for implementation.

T&L 522. Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

A study of current trends and practices associated with teaching and assessing inquiry-based math in elementary classrooms.

T&L 523. Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the foundations of teaching English language and literacy to English LanLanguage Learners (ELLs) and includes study of various approaches to ELL/bilingual education, methods of instruction, assessment of English language proficiency, and strategies to make content learning comprehensible for ELLs. Emphasis will be placed on praxis and current research in the field.

T&L 524. Reading in the Content Areas. 2 Credits.

How and why reading should be taught in the content areas (i.e. Social Studies, Science, Mathematics, etc.). Research studies in the field of content reading and a variety of instructional practices are reviewed.

T&L 525. Writing in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course examines writing as a process that is developmental, cultural, social, and individual. Emphasis is on effective implementation of the essential structures of writing workshop and on monitoring and assessing writers' growth.

T&L 526. Play in Development and Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores the role of play in cognitive, physical and social-emotional development, and the way in which play is incorporated into educational and other programmatic settings. Students will explore how assessment of play indicates a child's development, and they will use assessment to promote Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) for PreK-Grade 3 (ages 3-8) learners.

T&L 527. Curricular Foundations in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historical, philosophical, cultural, race, class, and gender influences on curriculum in early childhood, including the philosophy and mission of the Department of Teaching and Learning.

T&L 528. Children's Literature in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of children's literature and literary criticism which serves as the foundation for examining teaching methods that develop children's engagement with literature and promote reading achievement.

T&L 529. Language Development & Cognition in Children. 3 Credits.

This course provides foundational information about language and cognitive development in children. The course content will also analyze typical and atypical language and cognitive development. The focus of the course will include children birth to age eight. .

T&L 530. Foundations of Reading Instruction. 3-4 Credits.

This course focuses on the relationship between reading theory, research, contemporary issues and instructional practice. Emphasis is placed on strategic systems related to effective reading, instructional approaches that support the development of these strategic systems and assessment as collecting evidence of effective reading behaviors.

T&L 531. Early Literacy Development and Instruction. 3 Credits.

A study of early literacy processes including phonemic and print awareness, word recognition, comprehension, and writing. Emphasis is on reviewing current research and theory, assessment and instruction practices, and bridging language and literacy development in literacy rich environments.

T&L 533. Reading in the Secondary School. 2 Credits.

Development of reading-study skills in the content subject areas and reading strategy development.

T&L 534. Basic Reading Diagnosis and Remediation. 2 Credits.

Focuses on common causes of reading disability, methods of diagnosis, and corrective reading programs in the classroom. Corequisite: T&L 530.

T&L 535. Advanced Reading/Language Arts Diagnosis and Remediation. 2 Credits.

Analysis of interrelationships of learning difficulties in language arts areas and procedures for remediation. Prerequisites: T&L 530 and 534.

T&L 536. Teaching and Supervision of Elementary Language Arts. 3 Credits.

Considers the objectives of the elementary language arts program, methods of instruction, and recent curricular trends. Recent research is read and critiqued.

T&L 537. ELL Methods and Materials. 3 Credits.

This course explores current methods and materials in ELL education, with a focus on teaching academic language and sheltered content instruction. F,S,SS.

T&L 538. Supervision of Student Teaching. 2 Credits.

For supervisors and directors of student teaching in colleges and cooperating schools. Principles and practices on how to provide the most beneficial experiences for student teachers.

T&L 539. College Teaching. 3 Credits.

Explores learning styles and teaching styles, the components and responsibilities involved in college teaching, methods of teaching and motivating students, and current issues related to instruction in the college classroom.

T&L 540. Theory and Philosophies of Curriculum in Schools. 3 Credits.

This course explores the historical development of the K-12 curriculum, the philosophical and theoretical aspects applied to curriculum, and the social conditions that impact curriculum.

T&L 541. History of Higher Education in the United States. 3 Credits.

Study of major events and people shaping higher education in the U.S. Role, philosophy, and organization of institutions of higher education discussed.

T&L 542. Models of Teaching. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on various models of teaching: social interaction, information-processing, inquiry and behavioral. The purpose of the course is to provide teachers with a variety of instructional models related to meaningful learning experiences for students.

T&L 543. Scholarly Writing. 3 Credits.

Designed to assist students with learning the art of scholarly writing, this course will aid students in designing, formatting, and completing research-based and other scholarly writing projects, as well as understanding the rules and norms of academic publishing.

T&L 544. Assessment in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

A wide range of assessment issues in higher education will be explored. This includes course, program, and institutional assessment as well as classroom assessment techniques. Students will examine and understand the assessment process.

T&L 545. Adult Learners. 3 Credits.

This course will cover theories of adult development, current research on adult learners, ways of assessing the needs and interests of adult learners, and ways of creating environments in which adult learners can thrive.

T&L 547. Technology in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Students will examine the various uses and integration of technology and media in higher education by faculty in their attempt to engage learners with each other, the course content, and with instructors.

T&L 548. The Professoriate. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of the development of the American professoriate by way of historical, scholarly, popular, and contemporary perspectives. It also examines the transition of new faculty members to their initial academic appointment.

T&L 549. Seminar. 1-4 Credits.

The seminar will focus on a specific topic relating to teaching and learning. The specific content will vary depending upon student needs and faculty resources.

T&L 550. Assessment and Evaluation in ELL Education. 3 Credits.

This course combines readings and theoretical discussion of assessment with hands-on experience in assessing ELLs. Students will learn how to use a variety of formal and informal assessments with a focus on how to use assessment data in planning instruction. Topics will include classroom-based assessments, language proficiency testing, testing accommodations for ELLs, and assessment of ELLs for special education and gifted education, and ELL program evaluation.

T&L 551. Second Language Acquisition for ELL Teachrs. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the socio- and psycho-linguisitic aspects of interlanguage by studying the theories and research of first and second language acquisition. Students will examine the nature of learners and their individual differences during the stages of language development, with a focus on children and K-12 classrooms.

T&L 553. Collaborative Relationships: Home, School and Community. 3 Credits.

A course appropriate for anyone working with families, early childhood educators, general educators, special educators, related service personnel, administrators and outside agency personnel. Topics covered include: (1) the various models of collaboration and consultation and the stages of each; (2) communication skills; (3) problem-solving; (4) conflict management; (5) diverse perspectives; (6) information collection procedures; (7) supervisory skills; (8) family characteristics and structure across the lifespan; (9) family focused intervention; (10) school choices; and (11) school issues such as poverty, domestic violence, teasing, bullying, and school violence.

T&L 558. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab1:Solids. 2 Credits.

T&L 559A. MS Sci.Eng-2: Solids. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites:T&L 558, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 559B. MS Sci.Eng-2: Solids. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites:T&L 558, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 566. Brain in Memory and Learning. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: Admissions to Grad School.

T&L 567. Language Structure and Analysis for ELL Teachers. 3 Credits.

This course explores the grammatical and discourse structures of the modern English language, analysis of grammar and discourse with a focus on specific problem areas for ELLs, and pedagogical implications for English language development.

T&L 568. Research and Advocacy in TESOL. 3 Credits.

This course prepares teachers to both understand and conduct research in TESOL. Emphasis will be placed on using research data to advocate for changes and improvement in ELL education.

T&L 569. Action Research. 3 Credits.

The study of the philosophy and methods of action research. Emphasis is focused on analysis of and reflection on one's teaching for the purpose of improvements in student learning. Prerequisite: Graduate status. S.

T&L 571. Teacher Education. 3 Credits.

Practices, issues, and trends in the design and implementation and assessment of programs for the preparation and development of K-12 teachers.

T&L 572. Teacher Education: Focus on the Learner. 3 Credits.

The study of teacher education in relation to the lives of P-12 students. This course includes the examination of children and their lives through aspects of race, religion, socioeconomics, linguistics and age, and considers educational implications for preservice and inservice teachers.

T&L 573. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab2:Liq/Gas. 2 Credits.

T&L 574. MS Sci.Eng-4: Liquid/Gas. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites:T&L 573, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher licensure and Admission to program "Improving Math and Science Literacy of Middle and High School Students of North Dakota Through Teacher-Faculty Partnerships".

T&L 575. Middle School Science and Engineering Lab3:Mot/Elec. 2 Credits.

T&L 576A. MS Sci.Eng.-6:Motion/Electric. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: T&L 575, admission to Graduate School, ND Teacher Licensure and employment as a teacher in a ND school.

T&L 576B. MS Sci.Eng.-6:Motion/Electric. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: T&L 576A.

T&L 580. Practicum in Schools. 1-4 Credits.

Practicum in study of desirable school practices, observations in nearby schools, and application of research findings in solving practical problems. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational and major area courses, and consent of the instructor and advisor.

T&L 581. Resident Internship. 4 Credits.

A full-time, year-long internship experience conducted in a cooperating school district. Interns are assigned as members of instructional teams with full responsibility for a portion of the cooperating school's instructional program. Prerequisites: Participation in the summer program prior to the internship and teaching licensure (see dept for approval).

T&L 582. Resident Internship. 4 Credits.

A full-time, year-long internship experience conducted in a cooperating school district. Interns are assigned as members of instructional teams with full responsibility for a portion of the cooperating school's instructional program. Prerequisites: Participation in the summer program prior to the internship and teaching licensure (see dept for approval).

T&L 583. Reading Clinic. 2 Credits.

Supervised clinic practicum in diagnosis of reading difficulties, report writing, and instruction. Includes school consultations. Corequisite: T&L 534.

T&L 584. Internship in Education. 1-8 Credits.

This is a culminating experience primarily for Sixth year and Doctoral students. The internships will be identified in one of the following sub-areas: (A) Educational Administration, (B) Special Education, (C) Curriculum, (D) Educational Research, or (E) Teacher Education. Prerequisites: Appropriate foundational, cognate, and major area coursework and consent of advisor and instructor.

T&L 589. Professional Development: Resident Teacher Program. 2 Credits.

This field-based experience provides mentoring and coaching, translates baccalaureate theory and research into practice, and requires active participation in the school placement and classroom setting. Issues and topics relevant to first year teachers and graduate education are emphasized through field work and discussions. Prerequisite: Admission into the Elementary Education Resident Teacher Program. SS.

T&L 590. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Exploration of special topics in the study of education not regularly included in available course offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advisor.

T&L 591. Readings in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Designed primarily for advanced graduate students. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor.

T&L 593. Independent Projects. 1-4 Credits.

T&L 596. Individual Research in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor.

T&L 995. Scholarly Project. 2 Credits.

The scholarly project demonstrates critical analysis and application of information and experiences gained throughout the program of study. The project allows students to demonstrate scholarly skills in an integrated manner that is directly related to their roles as teachers, program evaluators, and action researchers. The scholarly project must be approved by the student's adviser.

T&L 996. Continuing Enrollment. 1-12 Credits.

T&L 997. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

T&L 998. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

T&L 999. Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.


Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit

T&L 322. Administration and Leadership in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

An investigation of patterns of administration, curriculum organization, spatial resources, and staffing in early childhood settings, serving children 0-8 years old. Topics include federal and state laws and emerging trends in preschool and primary education in the state, region, and nation. Sixteen (16) hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education program. S.

T&L 422. Development of the Gifted and Talented. 2 Credits.

Research and theory for understanding the development needs of the more able child in early childhood and in educational experiences. S.

T&L 423. Assessment Program Planning/Special Needs Students. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles and practices of: (1) obtaining diagnostic information on school-related problems of a student; (2) assimilating this information and prescribing appropriate alterations based on continuous measurement data. Prerequisites: T&L 315 and T&L 319. F,S.

T&L 493. Workshop. 1-4 Credits.

Special problems in Special Education; consideration of special problems of concern to the Special Education teacher and other educators. F,S.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382