College of Arts and Sciences

Debbie Storrs, Dean

History and Organization

The College of Arts and Sciences dates from the founding of the University in 1883, and has had organic continuity from that date, in spite of some temporary changes in name and structure. The “Act for Establishing a Territorial University at Grand Forks” provided for a College of Arts “co-existent with” a College of Letters. In 1901 the name “College of Liberal Arts” was adopted, and retained until 1943, when “College of Science, Literature and Arts” was substituted. The latter name was kept until 1967. The President of the University served in effect as dean of the College until 1901, to be followed by George S. Thomas (1901-1911), Melvin A. Brannon (1911-1914), Vernon P. Squires (1914-1930), William G. Bek (1930-1948), Robert Bonner Witmer (1948-1965), and interim associate dean Philip A. Rognlie (1965-66). Bernard O’Kelly was dean from 1966 until his retirement in 1995 when he was succeeded by John Ettling (1995-1998). Albert Fivizzani served as interim dean of the College from 1998 until 2001. Martha A. Potvin became dean in 2001 and served until 2011, with Bruce Dearden serving as interim dean from 2004 to 2005. Kathleen A. Tiemann served as interim dean from 2011 to 2013, when Debbie Storrs became dean.

The College includes 18 academic departments: Anthropology, Art and Design, Biology, Chemistry, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminal Justice, English Language and Literature, Geography, History, American Indian Studies, Mathematics, Modern and Classical Languages, Music, Philosophy and Religion, Physics and Astrophysics, Psychology, Sociology, and Theatre Arts. The coordinator of the Honors Program, the coordinator and faculty of the Humanities and Integrated Studies Program, the director of the Interdisciplinary Studies Program and the Director of the Center for Community Engagement are also members of the College’s faculty. The faculty of departments structurally located in other colleges — Computer Science, Economics, Geology, and Political Science — are regularly consulted on an associate faculty basis, since the disciplines of those departments are historically associated with the liberal arts. Many of the liberal arts faculty are involved in various ways in the work of the College of Education and Human Development.

The College enrolls all undergraduates who wish to complete studies for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music or Bachelor of Science degree with concentration in some substantive or applicative field of study within the traditionally broad spectrum of the liberal arts.

Mission

By its nature and in accordance with its history, the College of Arts and Sciences concerns itself principally with higher education in the broadest or liberal sense. The Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music are therefore the principal first degrees offered by the College; through subsequent enrollment in the School of Graduate Studies, students pursue master’s or doctoral degrees in the liberal arts fields. Many undergraduates in the College are preparing themselves for specific professions—e.g., conservation, writing and editing, scientific research, the performing arts, secondary-school teaching, programming, translation, speech therapy, the justice system and government service. However, the College’s overall goal for all students is intellectual growth through study in the liberal arts: the natural sciences and mathematics, the humanities, the social sciences, and the fine arts. These fields of study concern themselves first with the nature of humanity and of the universe, rather than with specific vocational applications.

The College of Arts and Sciences therefore pursues these goals:

  1. To provide programs leading to the B.S. or B.A. in liberal arts disciplines and the B.Mus. or B.F.A. in the Fine Arts;
  2. To offer programs leading to career-ready baccalaureates in certain fields which have developed from liberal arts disciplines;
  3. To offer, through most of its departments, programs leading to master’s degrees and doctorates;
  4. To support scholarly and creative activity in the arts and sciences, so that both undergraduate and graduate students can be exposed to, and take an active part in, the creative and scholarly processes and the advancement of knowledge;
  5. To foster in students those abilities which contribute to all learning—skills of communication; habits of independent thought, analysis and judgment; and powers of imagination and creativity;
  6. To create an environment in the College, and throughout the University, which fosters the study and understanding of diverse cultures and international communities;
  7. To provide the opportunity for all students at the University to take courses in liberal arts disciplines.

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences are prepared on graduation for a wide variety of careers, or to continue their studies in graduate schools, as well as medical or law schools and other professional programs. Whether or not they pursue further study, their liberal education as undergraduates will have helped them become flexible life-long learners, and thus have prepared them for a future characterized by rapid change.

Admission to the College

Freshman students who have decided on a major in Arts and Sciences may be admitted directly to the College. Students enrolled in other colleges at UND who decide on an Arts and Sciences major may transfer to Arts and Sciences provided they are in Academic Good Standing. Transfer students with a satisfactory academic record (generally a C or 2.00 Grade Point Average) may be admitted directly to the College. Please note that some programs, e.g., Communication, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminal Justice Studies, Forensic Science, and Political Science have higher grade point average requirements.

Degrees

The only difference between the B.A. and the B.S. is that the latter degree is conferred upon students completing a major or concentration in mathematics or a natural science (biology and related fields, chemistry, forensic science, geography, and physics). In Psychology there are separate requirements for the B.A. and B.S. Students with both science and non-science majors (double majors) may choose either degree.

By following certain specified programs, students may also obtain one of the following special degrees: Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, B.S. in Chemistry, B.S in Criminal Justice Studies, B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology, B.S. in Geology, and Bachelor of General Studies (See the appropriate departmental listing.)

Degree Requirements

Basic requirements are the same for all students seeking a degree through the College of Arts and Sciences (except for those in the Four-Year Honors Program). These requirements fall into three main categories.

I. University Graduation Requirements (applicable to all undergraduates).

II. Transfer Credits. No more than 12 credits of transferred technical or vocational credit shall apply to the requirements for the degrees of the College of Arts and Sciences.

III. Language Requirements. Certain programs within the College require proficiency in another language, either two semesters of College level work (Level II) or 4 semesters (Level IV). Students are advised to consult the requirements for a given major under the heading “Required in Other Departments.” Students who are unsure about what their major will be are advised to establish language proficiency as early as possible.

IV. The Major or Concentration. Majors, basically a minimum of 33 credit hours in a single field, are offered in a variety of subjects. The requirements for these may be found in the departmental and interdepartmental listings. Students should note particularly the requirements not only of the majors and concentrations, but, where appropriate, the accompanying requisites in other departments. In the Major (or concentration) students must have a grade point average of at least 2.20 by graduation.

Majors Available in the College

  • American Indian Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Chinese Studies
  • Classical Studies
  • Communication
  • Communication and Disorders
  • Computer Science
  • Criminal Justice
  • Economics
  • English
  • Fisheries and Wildlife Biology
  • Forensic Science
  • French
  • General Studies
  • Geography
  • Geology
  • German
  • Graphic Design & New Arts Media
  • History
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Music Education
  • Music Performance
  • Music Therapy
  • Norwegian
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Social Science
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Theatre Arts
  • Women and Gender Studies

Multidisciplinary and Interdisciplinary Studies

Students with interests in Peace Studies, Russian Studies, Scandinavian Studies, Canadian Studies or other fields that are interdisciplinary in nature should consult the faculty in related disciplines as well as the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Certain students, e.g., those in the Honors Program, may graduate without a major or concentration.

Minors

A minor is not necessary for a degree from the College, but generally a student may declare a minor in any field in which a major is offered. Some minors, e.g., Intellectual History, Linguistics, and Nonprofit Leadership, are available where there is no major. Where a minor is not specifically listed in the appropriate part of the catalog, a student may declare a minor only with the approval of his adviser, the Dean, and the department or departments concerned. A Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.00 is required in a minor.

Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program

As part of their bachelor’s degree program, students may earn the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate by completing the requirements listed in the Undergraduate Departmental listings in this catalog.

Teacher Licensure Preparation

To prepare to teach in secondary schools, students must meet requirements set by the College of Education and Human Development. In addition, the candidate must have a major or concentration in a “teaching field” as listed in the same section. Students wishing professional licensure should, as soon as possible, seek advisement from, and admission to, the College of Education and Human Development as well as A&S. To be accepted for Student Teaching, applicants must have a 2.75 Grade Point Average (GPA) in their major, a 3.0 or better in all Education coursework, and a 2.75 GPA in all work attempted up to the time of application.

Law School Preparation

The University of North Dakota School of Law, in common with others, strongly recommends as preparation for legal studies the B.A. or B.S. with a broad, liberal education rather than specialized or technical training. For more specific expectations and entrance requirements, students should consult the Bulletin of the School of Law. See also the Law School.

Graduate Studies

Most departments in the College offer graduate work leading to the M.A., M.S., M.Mus, M.F.A. or M.Ed., and several have Ph.D. or D.A. programs. Students intending to continue their studies in graduate school should acquaint themselves early with the expectations and admission requirements of the various graduate programs as set out in the Bulletins of this university and other graduate schools.

 

Pre-Health Professional Programs

Students interested in any of the Pre-Health Professional programs listed below normally enroll in the College of Arts and Sciences (note: Pre-Nursing, Pre-PT and Pre-OT are not programs in the College of Arts and Sciences - please see the separate listings for them in this catalog under Nursing, PT and OT).  Information on the College of Arts and Sciences Pre-Health Professional programs is available on UND’s Pre-Health website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/. Freshmen students must attend the 3 required advising meetings for freshmen during the fall semester and 1 required advising meeting during the spring semester held by the Health Sciences Advisor - dates, times and location of these meetings are posted on the Announcement/Events link on the website above.  Older students may meet individually with the Health Sciences Advisor by appointment only - instructions for setting up appointments are posted on the Advising/Appointments link on the website above.

Pre-Chiropractic

Most chiropractic schools only require a minimum of three years of college; however, because of state licensing requirements, UND encourages students to complete an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. Most chiropractic schools require successful completion of courses in basic sciences, social sciences, humanities and English.  Some schools require or strongly recommend specific courses.  Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Chiropractic courses are available in the Pre-Chiro Guide on the UND Pre-Chiropractic Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-chiro.cfm.  For information on specific chiropractic schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Chiropractic website.

Pre-Dentistry

Most dental schools require a minimum of three years of college; however, the vast majority of admitted students have completed an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All dental schools require successful completion of at least one year each of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and English composition; and most require at least one semester of biochemistry, public speaking and art. Many schools require or strongly recommend additional specific courses. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Dentistry courses are available in the Pre-Dent Guide on the UND Pre-Dentistry Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-dent.cfm.  For information on specific dental schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Dentistry website.

Pre-Medicine

Nearly all medical schools require the completion of an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All medical schools require successful completion of courses in the basic sciences, social/behavioral sciences, math and English. Many schools require or strongly recommend additional specific courses. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Medicine courses are available in the Pre-Med Guide on the UND Pre-Medicine Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-med.cfm. For information on specific medical schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Medicine website.

Pre-Mortuary Science

The American Board of Funeral Service Education accredits about 60 mortuary science programs. The majority are two-year associate degree programs. There are some, however, some states (i.e., Minnesota) that require funeral directors to have a bachelor's degree in order to practice within their boundaries. In that case, there are 6 colleges and universi­ties which offer Mortuary Science programs that culminate in a bachelor's degree - the University of Minnesota has such a program. Students may do two years of Pre-Mortuary Science courses at UND before transferring to UM for completion of that bachelor's degree. A recommended curriculum and a sample schedule for the Pre-Mortuary Science courses are available in the Pre-Mort Science Guide on the UND Pre-Mortuary Science website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-mort-sci.cfm. For more information on Pre-Mortuary Science, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Mortuary Science website.

Pre-Optometry

Most optometry schools require a minimum of three years of college, however, the vast majority of admitted students have completed an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All optometry schools require successful completion of at least one year of biology, general chemistry, physics and English composition; and most require at least one semester of organic chemistry, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, statistics and calculus. Additional specific courses may required by each school. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Optometry courses are available in the Pre-Opt Guide on the UND Pre-Optometry website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-opt.cfm. For information on specific optometry schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Optometry website.

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine

Most osteopathic schools require the completion of an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All osteopathic schools require successful completion of courses in the basic sciences, social/behavioral sciences, math and English. Many schools require or strongly recommend additional specific courses. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Osteopathic Medicine courses are available in the Pre-Osteo Guide on the UND Pre-Osteopathic Medicine Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-osteomed.cfm. For information on specific osteopathic schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Osteopathic Medicine website.

Pre-Pharmacy

Most students entering pharmacy schools have completed 3 or more years of undergraduate preparation.  Most pharmacy schools require successful completion of at least one year each of general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and English composition; and most require at least one semester of biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, statistics and calculus. Additional specific courses may required by each school. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Pharmacy courses are available in the Pre-Pharm Guide on the UND Pre-Pharmacy Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-pharm.cfm. For information on specific pharmacy schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Pharmacy website.

Pre-Physician Assistant

Most traditional physician assistant programs require an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. Most physician assistant programs require successful completion of at least one semester of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, statistics, psychology and English composition. Additional specific courses may required by each school. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Physician Assistant courses are available in the Pre-PA Guide on the UND Pre-Physician Assistant website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-pa.cfm. For information on specific physician assistant schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Physician Assistant website.

Pre-Podiatry

Most podiatry schools prefer or require the completion of an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All podiatry schools require successful completion of at least one year each of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and English composition. Many schools require or strongly recommend additional specific courses. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Podiatry courses are available in the Pre-Podiatry Guide on the UND Pre-Podiatry Program website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-pod.cfm. For information on specific podiatry schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Podiatry website.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Most veterinary schools prefer or require the completion of an undergraduate degree - any major is acceptable. All veterinary schools require successful completion of courses in the basic sciences, advanced biological sciences, social/behavioral sciences, math and English. Some schools require or strongly recommend additional specific courses. Recommended curricula and a sample schedule for Pre-Veterinary courses are available in the Pre-Vet Guide on the UND Pre-Veterinary website at http://arts-sciences.und.edu/pre-health/pre-vet.cfm. For information on specific veterinary schools and their requirements, consult with the Health Sciences Advisor in the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the UND Pre-Veterinary website.


Honors and Independent Study

Students in the College are encouraged to take advantage of the educational opportunities offered by the Four-Year Honors Program and the Senior Departmental Honors Program. In these programs the student bears a greater responsibility for his/her own education than in the more formal programs of the College. Therefore the honor student must develop at once intellectual initiative and intellectual self-discipline; and usually the rewards are correspondingly greater.

Without entering either of the Honors Programs, both of which require better than average academic attainment, students will find within the College many opportunities for independent study and research for which they can receive academic credit. Most departments have “readings” or “special topics” courses in which the student can work with a faculty member in some area not covered by regular courses. Overseas study, especially for Language Majors (several of whom receive scholarships to finance their travel through the Arneberg and Larsen awards each year), is another way in which students can profitably extend the scope of their education. In a variety of circumstances, study or research done off campus can also be offered for academic credit.

Students in the College are also encouraged to plan and to propose to the Dean or to appropriate faculty members interdisciplinary courses which they believe would be educationally sound and interesting. Arts and Sciences is a non-departmental course listing, under which students may earn credit for special “on-demand” courses, seminars, etc. Students or faculty members who wish to propose a special course under this number should consult the Dean’s Office.

Students who have special preparation in the subject matter of a course offered at the university or who because of particular interest bring themselves to proficiency or depth in the subject through private study may, with permission of the department, challenge the course (or courses) for credit by special examination.

Office of the Registrar

Tel: 701.777.2711
1.800.CALL.UND
Fax: 701.777.2696

Twamley Hall Room 201
264 Centennial Drive Stop 8382
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8382